40% of women 18-30 have altered menstrual cycle after jab

Increased incidence of menstrual disorders in young women after coronary vaccination

Published 21.12.2021

This article presents the first results from the National Institute of Public Health’s major survey of the connection between coronary vaccine and menstrual disorders. Initially, data collected from women aged 18–30 years who participated in the Norwegian cohort survey UngVoksen are presented.

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Text: Lill Trogstad, Ida Laake, Anna Hayman Robertson, Siri Mjaaland, Ida Caspersen, Per Magnus, Lene Juvet and Berit Feiring

These are the results of the survey:

  • There was a high incidence of the various menstrual disorders among menstruating women aged 18-30 years.
  • As many as 37.8 per cent reported at least one of the disorders during the last menstrual period before vaccination.
  • After the first dose, 39.4 per cent reported at least one of the menstrual disorders, and after the second dose 40.9 per cent.
  • The proportion who reported more severe menstrual bleeding than usual was higher after the first vaccine dose than before vaccination, 13.6 per cent and 7.6 per cent, respectively.
  • After the second dose of vaccine, the incidence of several types of menstrual disorders increased.
  • The menstrual disorders after the first dose were on average returned to the baseline level at the time of vaccination with dose two, ie about two to three months after vaccination with the first dose.
  • Among women who reported menstrual disorders after the first dose, 92.3 per cent were also vaccinated with dose 2. Among women who did not report any menstrual disorders after the first dose, 94 per cent were vaccinated with dose 2.
  • Among women who experienced menstrual disorders after the first dose, close to two out of three experienced menstrual disorders also after the second dose.
  • We do not currently have information on the duration of menstrual disorders after dose 2, but we will continue to monitor this.

This was studied among female participants in the Norwegian cohort survey UngVoksen: Prevalence of

  • unusually heavy menstrual bleeding
  • unusually prolonged menstrual bleeding
  • unusually short interval between menstruations
  • unusually long interval between menstruations
  • unexpected intermittent bleeding
  • unusually painful menstrual bleeding
  • menstrual-like pain without bleeding

The questions that were asked to shed light on this were:

  • Did you experience any of the following during your last period before the first dose of vaccine?
  • Did you experience any of the following during your first period after the first dose of vaccine?
  • Did you experience any of the following during your last period before the second dose of vaccine?
  • Did you experience any of the following during your first period after the second dose of vaccine?

We found a general high incidence of the various menstrual disorders among menstruating women aged 18–30 years: As many as 37.8 per cent reported at least one of the disorders during the last menstrual period before vaccination. After the first dose, 39.4 per cent reported at least one of the menstrual disorders, and after the second dose 40.9 per cent.

In total, 7.6 percent of the participants reported that the last menstrual bleeding before vaccination with the first dose was more severe than what they usually experience. After vaccination, almost twice as many, 13.6 per cent, reported that the first menstrual bleeding after the vaccine was heavier than what they usually experience. The same pattern is seen for prolonged bleeding, for shorter intervals between menstrual cycles and for more intense menstrual pain than usual, see Table 1.

Table 1. Change in reported bleeding pattern before and after vaccination among 3972 menstruating women aged 18–30 years before and after the first vaccine dose.|Menstrual disorder|**Before 1st vaccine dose (unvaccinated) ***|After 1st vaccine dose (vaccinated with **at least one dose) ***|
| — | — | — |
|More powerful than usual|7.6%|13.6%|
|Longer duration than usual|9.3%|12.5%|
|Shorter intervals between periods|9.5%|12.0%|
|Long interval between menstruations|10.3%|10.9%|
|Unexpected intermittent bleeding|13.8%|14.2%|
|More painful menstruation than usual|11.4%|14.6%|
|Menstrual-like pain without bleeding|18.3%|15.8%|

** The uncertainty (95% confidence interval was +/- 1% for all menstrual disorders)*

There was no difference before and after vaccination in the occurrence of prolonged intervals between menstrual cycles, intermittent bleeding or menstrual pain / cramps without bleeding after the first dose. After the second dose, the incidence was increased for all the menstrual disorders asked, see Table 2.

Table 2. Change in reported bleeding pattern before and after vaccination among 3507 menstruating women aged 18–30 years before and after the second vaccine dose|Menstrual disorder|Before the 2nd vaccine dose (vaccinated with **one dose) ***|**After 2nd vaccine dose (vaccinated with two doses) ***|
| — | — | — |
|More powerful than usual|8.2%|15.3%|
|Longer duration than usual|8.2%|14.3%|
|Shorter intervals between periods|7.9%|14.3%|
|Long interval between menstruations|8.4%|10.5%|
|Unexpected intermittent bleeding|10.0%|15.1%|
|More painful menstruation than usual|9.8%|16.0%|
|Menstrual-like pain without bleeding|11.8%|16.5%|

  • The uncertainty (95% confidence interval was +/- 1% for all menstrual disorders)

Risk of recurrence This is the risk of menstrual disorders after the second dose among women who experienced this after the first dose (risk of recurrence):

  • After vaccination with the first dose of coronary vaccine, 13.6 percent reported unusually heavy menstrual bleeding.
  • Among these, close to two out of three women experienced unusually heavy bleeding even after the second dose (65.7 per cent).
  • Among women who did not experience heavier menstrual bleeding after the first dose, 8 percent reported unexpectedly heavy menstrual bleeding after the second dose, which is on a par with the incidence among the unvaccinated.
  • Also for the other menstrual disorders, the risk of recurrence after the second dose was of the same order of magnitude.

Vaccination coverage and significance of vaccine type for menstrual disorders
Among the participants, 98.4 per cent were vaccinated with the first dose, and 91.8 per cent with two doses. Among these, 59.4 per cent received Comirnaty (Pfizer) as the first dose, 35.8 per cent Spikevax (Moderna), 4.7 per cent AstraZeneca and 0.2 per cent Janssen. For dose two, 47.4 percent received Comirnaty and 52.6 percent Spikevax. Menstrual disorders were reported after both mRNA vaccines, in the same order of magnitude.

Limitations

The answers in the survey are based on self-reported data. It is conceivable that women who experienced menstrual disorders after the first dose were alerted and thus more likely to report this also after the second dose, compared with women who did not experience menstrual disorders after the first dose. There has been a lot of media attention around the signals that have come about menstrual disorders after coronary vaccination, and this may also contribute to more women reporting menstrual disorders after vaccination, even if they have previously experienced similar without vaccination.

Between 50 and 60 of the women had previously undergone corona infection. The results did not change as these were excluded from the analyzes.

Duration of menstrual disorders after vaccination

The study does not provide accurate information about the duration of menstrual disorders. However, the results in Table 1 and Table 2 show that the incidence is the same before vaccination with dose 1 and before vaccination with dose 2. The menstrual disorders for most were transient and back to baseline when dose two was given, ie about three months after vaccination with the first dose. We do not currently have information on the duration of menstrual disorders after dose 2, but we will continue to monitor this.

In an analysis among women with menstrual disorders, the researchers compared the risk before and after dose 1, and before and after dose 2 in the same woman. In this analysis, each woman is compared with herself, and thus the analysis also takes into account other factors in the woman that may have a bearing on the risk of bleeding, such as contraceptive use, use of other medications, other diseases or ailments from the abdomen.

In this analysis, a nearly doubled risk (90 percent increase) was found to experience heavier menstrual bleeding than usual after vaccination with the first dose, relative risk (RR) 1.90 (95 percent confidence interval 1.69-2.13). After the second dose, the relative risk was 1.84 (95 percent confidence interval 1.66-2.03). Increased risk after the second dose is also seen for prolonged bleeding, shorter interval between menstrual cycles, longer interval between menstruation, unexpected intermittent bleeding, more painful menstruation and for menstrual-like pain without bleeding, see Table 3.

Table 3. Risk of bleeding disorders among women with menstrual disorders, before and after dose one, and before and after dose two.|Menstrual disorder|Relative risk and 95% confidence interval after 1st vaccine dose|Relative risk and 95% confidence interval after 2nd vaccine dose|
| — | — | — |
|More potent than usual (634 dose 1, 557 dose2)|1.90 (1.69-2.13)|1.84 (1.66-2.03)|
|Longer duration than usual (636 dose 1, 541 dose 2)|1.46 (1.31-1.61)|1.71 (1.55-1.89)|
|Short interval between periods (603 dose 1, 488 dose 2)|1.32 (1.19-1.46)|1.57 (1.42-1.73)|
|Long interval between periods (594 dose 1, 434 dose 2)|1.07 (0.97-1.17)|1.24 (1.13-1.37)|
|Unexpected intermittent bleeding (725 dose 1, 559 dose 2)|1.09 (1.01-1.17)|1.49 (1.37-1.62)|
|More painful periods than usual (706 dose1, 582 dose 2)|1.35 (1.24-1.47)|1.62 (1.49-1.77)|
|Menstrual-like pain without bleeding (830 dose 1, 583 dose 2)|0.91 (0.86-0.97)|1.36 (1.27-1.45)|

The results are based on questions answered by almost 6,000 female participants in the Norwegian UngVoksen cohort in the period 21 October to 11 November 2021. The study has not yet been peer-reviewed, but has been submitted for pre-publication (preprint). The findings should be confirmed in several studies.

Follow-up and data analyzes continue both in UngVoksen and in the other cohorts. It may provide answers about menstrual disorders and bleeding also in other age groups, and the duration of the ailments.

Menstrual disorders are very common

Bleeding disorders are very common in women of childbearing (fertile) age and can have various causes. Menstruation can be affected by many factors, such as infections, drugs, hormones / contraception, muscle knots, endometriosis or other diseases of the uterus and cervix. When many women are vaccinated, it is therefore expected that someone will accidentally experience menstrual disorders and unexpected abdominal bleeding in relation to the time of vaccination.

In the early summer of 2021, the first reports came that more women were experiencing bleeding disorders that they associated with vaccination. To investigate whether there is a connection between coronary vaccination and bleeding disorders, the Norwegian Institute of Public Health is therefore conducting a large survey among more than 60,000 women aged 12–80 in Norway. Through electronic questionnaires, participants answered questions about menstruation and bleeding disorders.

The main purpose of the study is to find out whether bleeding disorders occur more frequently in vaccinated than non-vaccinated women.

The population surveys

Through the pandemic, participants in Norwegian population surveys have regularly answered questions about health problems and diseases, coronary heart disease, quarantine, testing, vaccination and symptoms or side effects after vaccination.

The contribution from the participants is very important and provides unique knowledge about conditions that cannot be retrieved from national health registers. We are very grateful for the efforts and perseverance the participants have shown us through the pandemic.

Data from the population surveys have previously been used in a study where an increased risk of skin bleeding was found after vaccination with Vaxzevria (AstraZeneca) compared with Comirnaty (Pfizer / BioNTech) or Spikevax (Moderna). The results of this study are published in the journal Vaccine.

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The young liberal women are usually the loudest proponents of the vaccine so lol at them, you get what you pay for.

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And 38% reported problems before vaccine…great thread.

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These women exercise vigorously? Overweight? Underweight? Stressed? Starting new medications? Working with pesticides? On the pill? Sleeping poorly? Travelling across different time zones?

All of that can give a woman an irregular cycle…

A heavier flow, cramps and bleeding for an extra day isn’t abnormal at all. If they continued to bleed for 2 weeks Or more that would be a cause for concern.

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Look at all the health effects already and probably the majority of people have only been vaxxed for 1 year. Just imagine all the health problems in 5,10, or 20 years from now.

LOL suck it you mutants with your twisted DNA. That’ll teach you to be npc sheep. Go get another vaxx shot and booster, sheep.

Damn it feels good to be a Pureblood.

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I know it’s amazing it went up .8% and even acknowledged the flaws in the paper but whatever.

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My wifes changed after the shot

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You’ve never been with a chick old enough to have her period

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HAHAHA !

Come now. This is the og. You know they don’t read past the misleading thread title

Girl Explosion GIF

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wife got myocarditis after a few jabs

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My wife’s cycle got fucked up for a couple months after the jab

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I couldnt jab my wife last night due to her cycle.

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My wife used the same excuse. But we fucked the night before.

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I still got a blowjob, life’s good

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That’s how you know it’s working

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