Americanized versions of ethnic foods R better IMO

I have to say that I love to try different authentic foods from around the world, but at the end of the day I like the Americanized ethic foods better.

Chinese, I dont like chicken heads and feet. I prefer chow mien, and upper class Americanized dishes, not Panda express.

Korean, I much rather have Korean BBQ than real Korean food. When I go to authentic Korean resturaunts I dont enjoy myself as much.

Japanese, I like Hawaii style Japanese food better than traditional food. I dont like fermented vegis and I like Hawaiianized sushi better, though I am dying to try master Jiros sushi before he dies.

Not taco bell level, but americanized mexican restaurants give me 79% less diarrhea than the "hole in the wall (you'll love it)" mexercan places

dude you're crazy. If you've had good Chinese or Japanese food they are in no way comparable to the american adaptions. I too would love to try Jiro's sushi but you're looking at like 600 bucks for a meal and a years worth of wait. Might want to try his sons.

How is Korean BBQ not traditional to Korea?

I have to disagree with you on Americanized foods being better as well. I can't think of one ethnic food where the Americanized version even comes close.

Pugilist82 - How is Korean BBQ not traditional to Korea?

I have to disagree with you on Americanized foods being better as well. I can't think of one ethnic food where the Americanized version even comes close.


Pizza



 

that's because most real ehtnic food consits of sticks and onions

PatK - 
Pugilist82 - How is Korean BBQ not traditional to Korea?

I have to disagree with you on Americanized foods being better as well. I can't think of one ethnic food where the Americanized version even comes close.


Pizza



 


Actually, you're right. I forgot pizza. I do prefer the American version to the Italian.

For the most part I agree.  Ethnic foods are awesome because they're not normal but today's foodie culture has made traditional foods more amazing.

I agree for the most part.

Ethnic foods are often born of necessity. They are mader from locally available ingredients, and often made to be inexpensive yes delicious. Part of the beauty of some of these recipes is in their simplicity. Yet that simplicity is not on purpose -- it is because it's all they had around.

In America we have the luxury of access to many more ingredients.

That said, it can be over done.

Adding scoops of sour cream and guacamole to a plate of enchiladas makes it better IMO. But drowning your simple street tacos in that stuff kind of takes away from what it's suppose to be.

I honestly prefer home cooking to everything. Even the best restaurant experience doesn't compare to the most lovingly prepared home cooked meals. The reason I go to a restaurant is because I don't have the time and equipment/ingredients to prepare everything I might order. So usually I like to get stuff I wouldn't make at home when eating out.

I can't speak on sushi because it's not my thing. On the off occasion I find myself at a sushi place -- I make sure whatever roll I order is of the cooked variety. But knowing Japanese culture of perfection -- I would guess that Americanized sushi is not as good as traditional.

onepunchJD - I agree for the most part.

Ethnic foods are often born of necessity. They are mader from locally available ingredients, and often made to be inexpensive yes delicious. Part of the beauty of some of these recipes is in their simplicity. Yet that simplicity is not on purpose -- it is because it's all they had around.

In America we have the luxury of access to many more ingredients.

That said, it can be over done.

Adding scoops of sour cream and guacamole to a plate of enchiladas makes it better IMO. But drowning your simple street tacos in that stuff kind of takes away from what it's suppose to be.

I honestly prefer home cooking to everything. Even the best restaurant experience doesn't compare to the most lovingly prepared home cooked meals. The reason I go to a restaurant is because I don't have the time and equipment/ingredients to prepare everything I might order. So usually I like to get stuff I wouldn't make at home when eating out.

I can't speak on sushi because it's not my thing. On the off occasion I find myself at a sushi place -- I make sure whatever roll I order is of the cooked variety. But knowing Japanese culture of perfection -- I would guess that Americanized sushi is not as good as traditional.

I was in Japan last year. Ate widely, including sushi. Very s

Damni

Meant to write Mexican, I love traditional mexican food but I feel that tacos, burritos etc were Americanized things.

No other way to go.

I love Americanized foreign food.

I'm about 50/50 when it comes to this.

Traditional South American tacos would normally include crickets and shit, like they ate in ancient times. Probably delicious, but fuck that. TexMex food is all carbs, grease, and fat - which is delicious, but not authentic at all. They made that with what they could afford. It's just like American BBQ.

When it comes to Asian food like Thai, Indian, Chinese, Japanese, Vietnamese, Indonesian, etc. the ingredients they use really influence how the dish tastes like. Sure there are analogues, like using lemons for acid, rather than Kaffir limes, but the when food is from a certain region, you really need to have those ingredients to get the full experience.

Find a truly authentic Thai restaurant and order Nam Tok with Sticky Rice. Then try making it on your own with whatever you can find at the supermarket and you'll understand.

When cooks on YouTube tell you to substitute one ingredient for another, like when they say, "if you can't find palm sugar, brown sugar or regular sugar works" that's technically true. Sweet is sweet. However, you lose all of the nuances in that particular ingredient that make that dish great. When it comes to Japanese food, this is especially important. Their cuisine is built almost exclusively on a system with very few ingredients - but built in a very specific way.