Ancestors had weird sleeping pattern - 2x a night

 

 

wtf ?

 

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Your Ancestors Didn’t Sleep Like You

Author: | May 16 2013

Posted in Science, Trivia

 

Ok, maybe your grandparents probably slept like you. And your great, great-grandparents. But once you go back before the 1800s, sleep starts to look a lot different. Your ancestors slept in a way that modern sleepers would find bizarre – they slept twice. And so can you.

 

The History

The existence of our sleeping twice per night was first uncovered by Roger Ekirch, professor of History at Virginia Tech.

His research found that we didn’t always sleep in one eight hour chunk. We used to sleep in two shorter periods, over a longer range of night. This range was about 12 hours long, and began with a sleep of three to four hours, wakefulness of two to three hours, then sleep again until morning.

References are scattered throughout literature, court documents, personal papers, and the ephemera of the past. What is surprising is not that people slept in two sessions, but that the concept was so incredibly common. Two-piece sleeping was the standard, accepted way to sleep.

“It’s not just the number of references – it is the way they refer to it, as if it was common knowledge,” Ekirch says.

An English doctor wrote, for example, that the ideal time for study and contemplation was between “first sleep” and “second sleep.” Chaucer tells of a character in the Canterbury Tales that goes to bed following her “firste sleep.” And, explaining the reason why working class conceived more children, a doctor from the 1500s reported that they typically had sex after their first sleep.

Ekirch’s book At Day’s Close: Night in Times Past is replete with such examples.

But just what did people do with these extra twilight hours? Pretty much what you might expect.

Most stayed in their beds and bedrooms, sometimes reading, and often they would use the time to pray. Religious manuals included special prayers to be said in the mid-sleep hours.

Others might smoke, talk with co-sleepers, or have sex. Some were more active and would leave to visit with neighbours.

As we know, this practice eventually died out. Ekirch attributes the change to the advent of street lighting and eventually electric indoor light, as well as the popularity of coffee houses. Author Craig Koslofsky offers a further theory in his book Evening’s Empire. With the rise of more street lighting, night stopped being the domain of criminals and sub-classes and became a time for work or socializing. Two sleeps were eventually considered a wasteful way to spend these hours.

No matter why the change happened, shortly after the turn of the 20th century the concept of two sleeps had vanished form common knowledge.

Until about 1990.

The Science

Two sleeps per night may have been the method of antiquity, but tendencies towards it still linger in modern man. There could be an innate biological preference for two sleeps, given the right circumstances.

In the early ‘90s, psychiatrist Thomas Wehr of National Institutes of Mental Health conducted a study on photoperiodicity (exposure to light), and its effect on sleep patterns.

In his study, fifteen men spent four weeks with their daylight artificially restricted. Rather than staying up and active the usual sixteen hours per day, they would stay up only ten. The other fourteen hours they would be in a closed, dark room, where they would rest or sleep as much as possible. This mimics the days in mid-winter, with short daylight and long nights.

At first, the participants would sleep huge stretches of time, likely making up for sleep debt that’s common among modern people. Once they had caught up on their sleep though, a strange thing started to happen.

They began to have two sleeps.............

 

MORE:

 

http://slumberwise.com/science/your-ancestors-didnt-sleep-like-you/

My wife already does this...because she's lazier than shit.

sub'd Phone Post

They all had bad backs from shitty beds , that's why Phone Post 3.0

I sleep twice a night too... but mostly because I always wake up between 2-3 am and then finally fall asleep 15 minutes before my alarm.

TwinkieTheKid - My wife already does this...because she's lazier than shit.

You are clearly married to my wife wtf?

My sleep cycle also consists of 2x 4 hour periods, at least when my schedule allows.

Wait............didn't 12hour work days used to be the norm? I'm guessing that 95% of the population back then did some sort of manual labor. So staying in your bedroom for 12 hrs and working 12 hrs in the field takes up 100% of your time?


I'm calling bullshit.

I used to do this, it's just how my schedule was. I would get home around 5'ish, and sleep until about 7:30 or 8. Then I'd get up and start my evening until a little after 3am, then I'd go to sleep and wake up a little before 9 to go to work. I can't do that any more b/c I'm with a different job that's further away, so my commute time screws everything up.

I'm also a big fan of naps though. I if I can I like to take a 20-30 minute nap after work, I feel like I have so much more energy the reset of the evening if I do that

I pass out for 8-10 hours after I whack my bag Phone Post 3.0

martinburke -

Not only did the medieval peasant have a pretty easy day when he worked, he also got a ton of religious holidays where he didn't work at all.

http://groups.csail.mit.edu/mac/users/rauch/worktime/hours_workweek.html

 

 

Thanks for posting the link... very interesting. Phone Post

This is how I sleep. I don't feel so neurotic now. I must be hard working and awesome. Phone Post 3.0

Interesting. Phone Post 3.0

Ttt Phone Post

That's awesome, I would love this cycle. As is I only sleep 5-6hrs at a stretch any way... Phone Post