Any Computer Science people here?

Hey what are some standard programming languages on demand right now from employers? Python? Java? etc. What do you currently have? Were you self taught? Yes I know Indians are taking our jobs. Also whats a good seasoning mix for shredded chicken? :)

There used to be a thread on here where some of dude was teaching people how to write code. On phone or I would search for it. Have you checked ITGround? Phone Post

It's hard to find Java programmers and they are highly sought after.

You might try Lynda.com if you are trying to learn Java or other programming languages.

Just to be clear, do you mean Computer Science as in research? Or do you mean software engineer type programming? Phone Post 3.0

AKAhappy - Just to be clear, do you mean Computer Science as in research? Or do you mean software engineer type programming? Phone Post 3.0
This. Should be interesting thread. Phone Post 3.0

AKAhappy - Just to be clear, do you mean Computer Science as in research? Or do you mean software engineer type programming? Phone Post 3.0

whoops I ment software engineer sorry.

armbarring -
AKAhappy - Just to be clear, do you mean Computer Science as in research? Or do you mean software engineer type programming? Phone Post 3.0

whoops I ment software engineer sorry.
It seems Java and mobile apps are the new hotness.

I've been taking on additional work developing mobile apps to try to learn more and expand my portfolio.

Outside of that you can always pick up one of the "niche" languages like Groovy or even Ruby (it's gotten a little more mainstream lately though) and if you can land a job they tend to pay on the high side. The problem is if or when they fall off you're stuck with several years of experience that may not even be relevant.

The big gamble in my opinion is going to anything the runs on a mainframe. The workforce is aging and will be retiring soon. That would leave a lot of towns with no sheriff so to speak. I imagine one would be able to command a premium just to keep things running until some type of conversion or modernization effort could take place. If I were more of a gambling man I'd take a COBOL or IBM system z job with the goal of starting a boutique contracting company in the future. Phone Post 3.0

I played gordon freeman on a computer game.

Ama Phone Post

C and Java have proved to be a good base. Some scripting and sql are good to have too. Knowledge of assembly, hdl can tak you far as well.

armbarring - Hey what are some standard programming languages on demand right now from employers? Python? Java? etc. What do you currently have? Were you self taught? Yes I know Indians are taking our jobs. Also whats a good seasoning mix for shredded chicken? :)

depends on what you want to do.

web programming: java, javascript, html, php
mobile device programming: java, objective c, j2me
low level device driver programming: c++
database programming: sql, possibly java, possibly php

I've got java, javascript, php, a tiny bit of objective c, some c++, html and enough sql to be dangerous.

i got a BS in Comp Sci but pretty much everything I've listed I learned on my own.

i got no recipes for seasoning mix. i'm too lazy to shred chicken. i cook the breasts whole in the oven.

S Phone Post

My town currently has tons of opportunity in .net so c# is great to know here.

I'm not too sure I like the direction microsoft has been going, so it will be interesting what happens to their development platforms.

Other that mobile is obviously huge so android, ios , html 5 are all good candidates.

Luckily once you learn the fundamentals, most translate from language to language aside from syntactical sugar. Phone Post

Java, C#, Python are prolly the top 3 for application development.

There's lots of web dev out there so learning html/css and javascript are needed, along with a framework.

System level languages like C++ and C will always be around. Recently I've heard C++ pays a lot since the programmer masses have recently shifted to managed languages, thus leaving a shortage.

Should I look into learning everything I can about linux? As AKAhappy brought up whats something that will stand the test of time and not be a flavor of the week? Is there a job market for database admin etc?

Im looking at this Ruby on rails. Whats with businesses wanting that?

Java, my dude.

C++ is something to look into as well.


And YES, Linux. Linux is the CS OS. If that makes any sense. Lol.

Regardless if you are going into Software Engineering or CS...

To stay relevant in the field you've got to be able to continue to learn/teach yourself. Technology outdates itself everyday. So when you finish your degree, make sure to keep learning.


This will apply in any "technology-related" field.

The most important thing is picking a main language for your resume and knowing EVERYTHING about it. That combined with CS fundamentals are most important. Only after that dabble in secondary skills.

You don't need Linux admin skills to be a programmer. It won't hurt, but only a tiny number of jobs would require those two together.

DB skills are always a good idea. SQL, DB modeling, are skills you learn today that will still be good in 8 years.

UltimoMegaPlata - Java, my dude.

C++ is something to look into as well.


And YES, Linux. Linux is the CS OS. If that makes any sense. Lol.

I disagree, unless you want to work for little money, but instead for a love of Linux. Write things people are paying for, Linux software ain't it.

Java or .net. Learn concepts because languages come and go. Understand object oriented languages and then focus on design patterns. Be flexible when it comes to other languages. Know SQL.

As far as Linux goes, learn how to navigate via the command line. Not much to know after that. I was a Linux geek in my younger days but every job I've had has been based on Windows. I deploy to Linux machines but the bulk of my day to day tasks are done on Windows. Phone Post 3.0