Any Computer Science people here?

OneScoup - 
UltimoMegaPlata - Java, my dude.

C++ is something to look into as well.


And YES, Linux. Linux is the CS OS. If that makes any sense. Lol.

I disagree, unless you want to work for little money, but instead for a love of Linux. Write things people are paying for, Linux software ain't it.

That depends on how good you are at it. There aren't a lot of starving kernel hackers...

I first learned some programming back in highschool and ive been dabbling in it. Turbo Pascal lol, html,visual basic and then some Java before I decided to move to vegas and be a cook. That was a bad idea. At the time I had no idea there was money in it. :/ AS of recently I have been trying to teach myself CSS.

I went html->css->javascript->php with a little SQL. Taught myself enough to write a couple wordpress plugins. Just started getting into objective-c. I think the progression I learned in was beneficial in that you could actually make something instead of "hello world" relatively quickly and then just keep expanding on it.

armbarring - Should I look into learning everything I can about linux? As AKAhappy brought up whats something that will stand the test of time and not be a flavor of the week? Is there a job market for database admin etc?

Everything about linux? Probably not.

Enough so you can move around on the command line? Yes.

I think there will always be markets for admins - database, network and system. But those are not necessarily programming jobs. There can be programming involved with them, but its not the main task.


Whatcha need Banja?

Start with C then work your way up.

ltr

BanjaCop - 
armbarring - Hey what are some standard programming languages on demand right now from employers? Python? Java? etc. What do you currently have? Were you self taught? Yes I know Indians are taking our jobs. Also whats a good seasoning mix for shredded chicken? :)
Would kill for someone well versed in PHP and MYSQL. Phone Post 3.0

Let's talk. Send me a PM. I might be able to help.

I've got 23 years in software development and have started my own business on the side.



I've been developing in Microsoft technologies since the mid 90's, from ASP on to .Net - both web and client, VB and C#. Lots of SQL as well. Recently I have been getting sick of writing code and am thinking about switching to analysis/architecture, anybody follow that route?

Hard to get a job only doing SQL, at least that is my case. I have a professional developer certification in MySQL.

I ended up buying the reference manual for PHP and teaching myself that.  I was just about to study for the ZEND certification when I got hired by a company.

Now I'm learning Linux/JavaScript/JQuery while I work. The pay isn't amazing but it's better than the $0.00 an hour I was making unemployed. And the people are nice and I'm learning a lot so it is a nice job in my opinion.

 

 

NicolasExitBJJ - I've been developing in Microsoft technologies since the mid 90's, from ASP on to .Net - both web and client, VB and C#. Lots of SQL as well. Recently I have been getting sick of writing code and am thinking about switching to analysis/architecture, anybody follow that route?

a position i was in for a long time morphed into that. it was alright but i'd rather write code.

FWIW, some combination of web tech (javascript, php) and thorough database knowledge (like how to use SQL to muck with a database) are pretty reasonable bets.

There are lots of websites that do that - collect info from a user, throw it into a database or perform lookups on the database and display the results to the user.

A lot of it, is crap. It works but runs slowly - usually on account of the DB.

Sourire -

Hard to get a job only doing SQL, at least that is my case. I have a professional developer certification in MySQL.

I ended up buying the reference manual for PHP and teaching myself that.  I was just about to study for the ZEND certification when I got hired by a company.

Now I'm learning Linux/JavaScript/JQuery while I work. The pay isn't amazing but it's better than the $0.00 an hour I was making unemployed. And the people are nice and I'm learning a lot so it is a nice job in my opinion.

 

 

Thanks for all the info guys. I went to UNLV to do casino management and you saw how that went. My family is seriously talking me into programming becuase they know I love that kind of stuff. Right now I have a shitty cook job and plenty time to go to school Phone Post

Tiobe Index is your friend: http://www.tiobe.com/index.php/content/paperinfo/tpci/index.html

FYI, CS professors like to use that site to get an idea of what is hot.

I plan on going back to a classroom setting too. What do you recommend learning on my own and in a class room? Phone Post

juszczec - FWIW, some combination of web tech (javascript, php) and thorough database knowledge (like how to use SQL to muck with a database) are pretty reasonable bets.

There are lots of websites that do that - collect info from a user, throw it into a database or perform lookups on the database and display the results to the user.

A lot of it, is crap. It works but runs slowly - usually on account of the DB.

Would that be caused by poor DB design?

armbarring - 

I plan on going back to a classroom setting too. What do you recommend learning on my own and in a class room? Phone Post


I would recommend learning an object oriented programming language (Java, Python, c++, etc.) to understand how object oriented programming works. If you figure that out well, it's easy to transition between different languages.

That's the general idea behind most undergraduate CS programming classes, anyhow.

armbarring - 

I plan on going back to a classroom setting too. What do you recommend learning on my own and in a class room? Phone Post


Get into the best CS program you can. Move if you have to. In the vast majority of cases, you'll have a better career graduating from an elite CS program than you will by learning on your own.

If I was starting out again I'd start with java or C# and learn sql as well.

Java is really big now as has been said.

I'd avoid C/C++ there's not a huge demand for beginners its extremely finicky and honestly its a waste of time to use those languages for most projects. You can develop faster with less issues in managed languages. C/C++ are extremely interesting to learn though. Later in your career you'll run into situations where you'll need them and by then you'll have enough experience to use them efficiently.

Stache - 
juszczec - FWIW, some combination of web tech (javascript, php) and thorough database knowledge (like how to use SQL to muck with a database) are pretty reasonable bets.

There are lots of websites that do that - collect info from a user, throw it into a database or perform lookups on the database and display the results to the user.

A lot of it, is crap. It works but runs slowly - usually on account of the DB.

Would that be caused by poor DB design?

poor design will screw you wherever it crops up.

alot of times, people pick up enough DB knowledge to be dangerous. there are web programmers out there that know web programming cold - they think in javascript and CSS and know the quirks of the 72 different web browsers out there.

lots of people who need websites also assume they also know how to design/optimize/use DB.

sometimes they do. sometimes they don't. that's with the US based folks.

outsource to India and God knows what you'll get.

i've never been a DB programmer per se, but the knowledge has always been helpful.