Any Environmental Engineers in this place??

I have just started my first year studying Environmental Engineering and was hoping for a tme possible about what it is type thread.

nope, but in-teresting.

MS in environmental engineering from Purdue but most my work involves environmental law.

I'm currently working on a CA Water Law presentation for tomorrow, the rules/regulations section of an engineering report for a recycled water project at LAX, and I have a comment letter due today at noon on a SWRCB 1211 petition....

Hit me up with your questions...I can't promise a timely response but I will respond...

bjjdna - MS in environmental engineering from Purdue but most my work involves environmental law.

I'm currently working on a CA Water Law presentation for tomorrow, the rules/regulations section of an engineering report for a recycled water project at LAX, and I have a comment letter due today at noon on a SWRCB 1211 petition....

Hit me up with your questions...I can't promise a timely response but I will respond...

Gutter water reclaimed for cooking only?

 

 

 

sorry, just wanted to sub the thread without just saying sub. 

I have been working in the environmental field for almost 20 years. Environmental cleanup sites, field work (sampling mostly), and a lot of GIS - went to school for both Environmental and GIS. I am not an engineer though.

Did you know anything prior to going in? How much of what you studied has helped in your jobs? What type of specializations can you get into through this field? Is it rewarding?

 

I can only think of those questions at the moment. If there is anything you think I forgot and you can elaborate on please feel free to add.

Ilikebjj - 

Did you know anything prior to going in? How much of what you studied has helped in your jobs? What type of specializations can you get into through this field? Is it rewarding?

 

I can only think of those questions at the moment. If there is anything you think I forgot and you can elaborate on please feel free to add.


There are a ton of job variations in the environmental field - too many to list them all.

Field work.
Design.
Industrial.
Government.
Waste Management.
Non-profit.
Private firms.
Compliance/Regulatory.
Military contractor.

My advice is to do as many internships as you can. One year work for an environmental/engineering firm, next work for the government, next work in industrial, etc.

My summer jobs consisted of: Environmental Engineer for Electrolux, working with Yellowstone staff on environmental issues in the park, and working with the military in Alaska (which didn't have all that much to do with environmental issues but it gave a me a good idea what it is like to work with the military).

Ilikebjj - 

Did you know anything prior to going in? How much of what you studied has helped in your jobs? What type of specializations can you get into through this field? Is it rewarding?

 

I can only think of those questions at the moment. If there is anything you think I forgot and you can elaborate on please feel free to add.


Did you know anything prior to going in?


I took lots of science and math in HS which prepared me for Purdue’s science/engineering programs.

My BS is in Earth and Atmospheric Science (EAS); Purdue’s school of science requires the same math, physics, chemistry, etc. that Purdue’s engineering program requires; so my undergrad education prepared me well for grad school and my MS in Environmental Engineering (EE).

I don't know about your school, but Purdue’s science/engineering programs were very difficult. There were a couple weed-out math/physics courses at Purdue [Physics 251 heat, electricity, optics & Calc 262 advanced differential equations], and honestly, I don’t know how I survived.

I don’t use any of the advanced math in my job and have forgotten most of it. When I read climate papers, I skip over the math because of my nightmares from college.

I suggest you take as much math, fortran, etc as possible, especially if you're into computer modeling.

Ilikebjj - 

Did you know anything prior to going in? How much of what you studied has helped in your jobs? What type of specializations can you get into through this field? Is it rewarding?

 

I can only think of those questions at the moment. If there is anything you think I forgot and you can elaborate on please feel free to add.


How much of what you studied has helped in your jobs?


I really enjoyed my core EAS/EE courses at Purdue and use the knowledge gained in my job to this day.

I took a grad course at Purdue, CE 656 Industrial Waste, which along with my other EE courses prepared me for my first job writing Industrial Waste NPDES Permits.

My next job I worked as a process engineer for an aerated static pile compost facility, managed compost and compost bin sale events, taught backyard composting workshops, and I also designed a windrow compost facility.

I went back to law school and changed jobs and began working for RAD (Regulatory Affairs Division) around 2000 where I’ve worked ever since.

I provide technical & legal support to upper mgt, execs, etc; I evaluate & comment on proposed regulation, legislation, permits, technical documents; I prepare NPDES/WDR/WRR permit applications & manage compliance for our water reclamation plants; I manage the general industrial storm water permit program for all of our regulated facilities; etc. etc.

Ilikebjj - 

Did you know anything prior to going in? How much of what you studied has helped in your jobs? What type of specializations can you get into through this field? Is it rewarding?

 

I can only think of those questions at the moment. If there is anything you think I forgot and you can elaborate on please feel free to add.


What type of specializations can you get into through this field?


For jobs you’re looking at industry, consulting, teaching, or government with responsibilities ranging from design work to project management, compliance, remediation, sustainability, air/water quality mgt, etc. Pick the area you’re most interested in and master it.

I suggest you bone up on your math and science. Check out the free courses offered online. I use Coursera, EdX, and Futurelearn but often times you can go right to the university itself. I’ve taken college level courses from MIT, Harvard, Yale, etc. – all for free

Is it rewarding?


I find my job very rewarding because I get paid to learn about the things that interest me, and I enjoy teaching. I’ve taught environmental law, and my job function involves educating policy makers, so I give several presentations every year. My latest presentations were on the status of the WOTUS rule and CA Water Law.

Hit me up if you have more questions...

Not an engineer but worked as an environmental engineer for an oil company for a couple years.

Thanks for the information so far from everyone. If there is anything else you think might be important I please feel free to fill it out.

How often do engineers have to actually use calculus in their job? As in hand writing problems and all that?

bumlife - 

How often do engineers have to actually use calculus in their job? As in hand writing problems and all that?


The last time I used calculus was for my wastewater/water treatment plant design classes in grad school.

I use math, chemistry, etc. as part of my job all the time, but mostly I use science & engineering principles to cost-effectively solve pollution problems while complying with environmental laws/regulations.

Environmental engineers that do design/modeling work use calculus but not anything more than second order differential equations.