Anyone have Golfers Elbow?

The Dude: 'Obviously you're not a golfer' bowling ball drops

So I dont golf..but it is basically tendonitis at bumpy bone on inside of elbow whereas tennis elbow is on the outside.

I think I brought it on by doing a lot of pull-ups in my routine...who knows.

It sucks though...I ice it and massage it and put Topricin on it...a cream a friend recommended.

I also bought one of those bands to wear a couple inches below to change the tension point.

Anyone ever deal with it and anything to help speed recovery?

It sucks man. Sorry to hear. Mine started a couple of years ago. At the time I was light lifting and doing bjj a few times a week. I got one of those bands and took 2 months off. It got a little better, but would come back when I did anything physical. So, I completely quit all physical activity with it for about 6-8 months and it seems to be gone... Along with my muscles lol.
It's a pain in the ass. I could put my finger on the exact spot it hurt on the inside of my elbow. Massaging it would make it feel better. I think surgery is available if it is serious. Hope it gets better, Snake. Phone Post 3.0

Yep, I've had it, and it takes a long time to heal.  If you really want to get at it, here's what I've done.

Ok, in a nutshell, golfer's elbow is due to weak and short forearm muscles.  They are too tight, and the result is the tendon is starting to tear off your elbow.  So your goals are to strengthen the forearm and lengthen the muscles.  Added to that, you'll have scar tissue and inflammation in the area, and you'll want to address that.

My stretching routine is done daily, and continues today, even though it's basically healed.  Extend your arm fully out, and lock out the elbow.  Point your fingers towards the sky with the palm facing away from you, and pull back with your other hand.  Hold the stretch for 15 seconds.  Now, point your fingers to the ground, so palm faces you, and pull with your other hand.  Lastly, point your fingers at the ground, palm facing away (your arm has to twist a little for this) and do the stretch.  Do both arms

Strength training is done with wrist rolls.  With your arm bent (not locked out this time), rest it on a table with your hand extended out over the edge.  Try to find something with a wider grip than a dumbbell.  When I first started this, I just used a bottle of vodka.  As the muscles developed, I upped the weight.  I bought a set of Fat Gripz to use with dumbbells...which is a tool you should have anyways.  

Hold the weight in your hand, with your palm facing up, and do full range of motion lifts.  When you get to the top of the lift, really emphasize your pinky side and contract that all the way up.  You'll probably get another half inch of movement on teh lift, and people usually don't do that.  Flip your hand over so the palm is facing down, and do the same.  Emphasize pinky side again.  Total time going up or down is 3 seconds each direction, so it's a slow controlled lift.  You might find that your motion is not really smooth, where the weight kinda jerks a little.  This is because your muscles aren't strong enough, and they're firing in little explosions to get the weight up.  Don't up the weight until the motion is totally smooth.  

 

I have it too. Not too bad but would like to avoid it getting worse for sure. Phone Post 3.0

Now, for scar tissue and inflammation...good fun.  When you've gotten the area warmed up some, you're going to be attacking that area.  Thumn, the palm of your hand, a golf ball, whatever it takes to really dig in to the inflammed area.  This will hurt, and will increase inflammation temporarily. But your goal is to work along that tendon to break down the scar tissue.  Also, aggressively workign along the tendon helps to stretch it.  But dig right into that area.

I've had Graston done to my forearms as well.  Also, I bought a set of Chinese massage cups, and have worked my forearms.  The purpose of the cups is to help separate the fascia from the muscle, so the entire area can move more freely and naturally.  

After you've worked it, ice and compression helps keep the inflammation down so you can get back at it later.  I know there's debate about the merits of icing, but I found that getting rid of it sped up my healing, because it meant less layoff for when I could stretch and do the weights again

Oh, I also forgot.  I did those stretches every day, and the weights every second day.  Since you're not doing a ton of weight, that'll be fine.  I would also put an elastic aroudn the ends of my fingers when they're straight, and then you flare the fingers out to stretch the elastic.  It helps work muscles in your forearm that are normally not used.  Muscular balance is everything.  Stretch your biceps too.  Them being tight can increase strain on your elbow. 

Take glutamine and BCAAs.  

In..ive been out of lifting for 4 months cuz of this Phone Post

VU Mencken for the next couple days man

Thank you!!!! Starting the stretches now

My forearms have always been strong (maybe tight though) but I def introduced a new stressor in the multitude of pull-ups.

Also in googling pull-ups are a common trigger for it

THANKS FOR INFO!!!!

VTFU

I bought one of those ace Velcro bandages with a little air pillow in it to keep pressure on the spot when I need to use it. 2-3 days at work I needed it and tried to rest it as much as possible. I imagine mine is not near as bad as most because I don't have problems anymore Phone Post 3.0

I have tight forearms too.  One thing I found when pulling back my forearms was my fingers didn't want to extend back and straight.  They wanted to stay curled forward, particularly the second knuckle of the middle two fingers..  Each knuckle should extend straight.  Really work on straightening those out as you stretch back.  It'll be unpleasant, but it's all connected.  

Sub Phone Post

I have cuckolds knee Phone Post

Squeeze a tennis ball. Phone Post

Mencken - 


Yep, I've had it, and it takes a long time to heal.  If you really want to get at it, here's what I've done.



Ok, in a nutshell, golfer's elbow is due to weak and short forearm muscles.  They are too tight, and the result is the tendon is starting to tear off your elbow.  So your goals are to strengthen the forearm and lengthen the muscles.  Added to that, you'll have scar tissue and inflammation in the area, and you'll want to address that.



My stretching routine is done daily, and continues today, even though it's basically healed.  Extend your arm fully out, and lock out the elbow.  Point your fingers towards the sky with the palm facing away from you, and pull back with your other hand.  Hold the stretch for 15 seconds.  Now, point your fingers to the ground, so palm faces you, and pull with your other hand.  Lastly, point your fingers at the ground, palm facing away (your arm has to twist a little for this) and do the stretch.  Do both arms



Strength training is done with wrist rolls.  With your arm bent (not locked out this time), rest it on a table with your hand extended out over the edge.  Try to find something with a wider grip than a dumbbell.  When I first started this, I just used a bottle of vodka.  As the muscles developed, I upped the weight.  I bought a set of Fat Gripz to use with dumbbells...which is a tool you should have anyways.  



Hold the weight in your hand, with your palm facing up, and do full range of motion lifts.  When you get to the top of the lift, really emphasize your pinky side and contract that all the way up.  You'll probably get another half inch of movement on teh lift, and people usually don't do that.  Flip your hand over so the palm is facing down, and do the same.  Emphasize pinky side again.  Total time going up or down is 3 seconds each direction, so it's a slow controlled lift.  You might find that your motion is not really smooth, where the weight kinda jerks a little.  This is because your muscles aren't strong enough, and they're firing in little explosions to get the weight up.  Don't up the weight until the motion is totally smooth.  



 


I've only encountered it a handful of times but feel this post is pretty much perfect.

Generally, it is attributable (in golf) to the way the player holds the club which is an easy enough fix but for the two more persistent cases I referred them to our fitness department to do basically what is described above.

I had it forever.

Lots of misunderstanding about what it is. It's NOT inflammation. It's micro tears.

You need to strengthen the area.

This is THE tool and exercise to use.
http://www.thera-band.com/store/products.php?ProductID=20

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=vZsa0bBCAf0 Phone Post 3.0

waxwing slain - I had it forever.

Lots of misunderstanding about what it is. It's NOT inflammation. It's micro tears.

You need to strengthen the area.

This is THE tool and exercise to use.
http://www.thera-band.com/store/products.php?ProductID=20

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=vZsa0bBCAf0 Phone Post 3.0


That's like saying a cut is NOT bleeding, it's when the skin gets torn by a sharp object.  Bleeding happens as an effect of the cut, just as those tears cause inflammation

thanks

Inflammation happens but is not the primary cause. There's been a huge amount of recent research squashing the idea that its primarily an inflammation issue. This is why steroid injections not only don't work they can actually hurt for long term recovery. Phone Post 3.0

waxwing slain - Inflammation happens but is not the primary cause. There's been a huge amount of recent research squashing the idea that its primarily an inflammation issue. This is why steroid injections not only don't work they can actually hurt for long term recovery. Phone Post 3.0


Oh, yep, I definitely don't think treating it as solely an inflammation issue is the right path.  But addressing inflammation as a portion of the treatment will speed healing

I battled this shit in both elbows from weightlifting for 2 years.

After I got it under control with the therabar and consistent stretching, i switched to low rep and barbell exercises only. I've been free of it 2 years now. Phone Post 3.0

Yes, I have battled it on and off over the years. It is a very common climbing injury.

There's some good info already posted which I will not repeat.

I will add things that I do (apologies if I am repeating anything that has already been stated):

1) Get one of these. They are the ultimate in self massage.
http://armaid.com/

2) Exercises to balance out the weak muscles / stabilizers

1) Reverse wrist curls

2) Hand openers. This is where you wrap rubber bands around the ends of all finger and the thumb and open your fingers against the resistance. Can also be done by sticking closed hand into a bucket of sand and opening.

3) Pronation / suppination. Using a dowel or dumbell with weight on only one end (5 lbs is a good start) hold in hand with elbow pulled into your hip and forearm parallel with the ground. Turn your hand over, back and forth so the end of the bar is traveling ~180 degrees one side to the other.

A better version of this involves using elastic bands on the dowel / rod so there is constant tension as the end moves, instead of less resistance / more resistance as gravity pulls on the end.

On all of those exercises, you should be feeling a decent pump in the muscles at 30 - 40 reps. Do a set of one, then rest 2 minutes, then do a set of another, rest, then another set.

Do it multiple times a day as long as you do not feel sharp "unhealthy" pains. Increase resistance is you get stronger. Don't slack off when you begin feeling better.

HTH