Article Fixing the Indy's

The esteemed promoter & former wrestler Ken Wayne recently wrote an article chronicling some of the rampant problems plaguing the indy scene today. He's blunt, and at times brutally honest. Yet these things need to be said, and more importantly, they need to be understood! Below are some excerpts of note:

"I know there are a lot of the guys in the independents that would like nothing more than to get a developmental deal, go to Louisville and get called up to the WWE. But I have news for the vast majority of you: You don't have a chance. I don't mean to be negative, but it's the truth, plain and simple. I would venture to say that 99% of you are not anywhere near ready to even go to Louisville. And some are not even ready for a backyard fed. The dedication, commitment, and sacrifices you have to make to get there are lacking. I don't think most of the guys at the indy level quite understand what it really takes to get to Louisville, much less to the WWE."

"I see a lot of guys in the dressing rooms and I try to watch their matches (even when they don't ask me to watch) and I try to talk with all of them, and I have to tell you, some of them have absolutely no business in a wrestling dressing room or wrestling ring. Just because they want to be called wrestlers doesn't make them wrestlers. Just because you are getting in the ring doesn't mean you are a wrestler. I can stand in a garage, but it doesn't make me a car. We need to weed out those guys. They hurt the business and all of us. Fans included."

"First and foremost, LEARN YOUR CRAFT!!!! I cannot say that loud enough or often enough. There are guys that do some great stuff in the ring, if you want to be a gymnast or acrobat, but you are far from being a wrestler, and especially one that will put a nickel in anyone's pocket. Remember, this is a business and it's about making money, not your personal ego fix."

"Don't do stuff just because you can. If the fans are quiet the first five minutes of your match, that's OK. As long as they are not up going to the bathroom or concession stand, you have their attention. That's the first step of having a match. And don't try to get their attention by being shocking. It's been done to death, it's a short cut, and the fans really don't appreciate short cuts. Once again, LEARN YOUR CRAFT!!!! It takes time, guys, and you won't learn it over night."

"Lose the attitudes, you have no basis for it. Guys, you are wrestling in front of a handful of people. You are not over to the point that you are packing them in and a promoter can't do without you. In fact, no one is. Even if you were packing them in, wrestlers are expendable, promoters are not. It's your name on the card that people are not coming to see. You can walk out on a promoter tonight and tomorrow he will have a dozen more just like you. The promoter allows you a place to work, the least you can do is lose the attitude and LEARN YOUR CRAFT!!! And then maybe you can make gas money and eventually make a living. It takes a lot of hard work on everyone's part. Work with the promoter, not against him."

Continued

"If you guys knew how many times I have heard fans look at some of the 'wrestlers' and comment, "I could kick his ass", and they were right, you wouldn't believe it. But if you can get in the ring, look like a wrestler and display some wrestling skills, they aren't as likely to say that. At least try to look like and conduct yourself like a wrestler and a professional, and have some pride in the business and yourselves. They don't come to see people that are the same as they are. They come to see someone skilled at something they can't do. Someone that is bigger than life. And when they believe they can do as good, or better than you do, you lose a fan."

"I don't know if anyone has noticed, but the independent scene isn't setting things on fire. I think the problems can be corrected, but not without some major house cleaning. Some feelings will probably get hurt, some will probably get angry, some will survive, and some will fall by the wayside, but sometimes that is just the way it goes in the real world & or life in general. And in the end, it will be better for everyone."

The full article can be found here:

www.pwinsider.com/ViewArticle.asp?id=812&p=1

Great article,but I honestly don't see that many indies that would like to go to the WWE.

So perhaps he's right about there's maybe 99% of indy wrestlers that would not make it to the WWE,being that there is probably only five indy wrestlers that cares to try the WWE............

TTT

Also,when he says "Lose the attitudes, you have no basis for it. Guys, you are wrestling in front of a handful of people. You are not over to the point that you are packing them in and a promoter can't do without you. In fact, no one is. Even if you were packing them in, wrestlers are expendable, promoters are not. It's your name on the card that people are not coming to see. You can walk out on a promoter tonight and tomorrow he will have a dozen more just like you. The promoter allows you a place to work, the least you can do is lose the attitude and LEARN YOUR CRAFT!!! And then maybe you can make gas money and eventually make a living. It takes a lot of hard work on everyone's part. Work with the promoter, not against him.",was I the only one who immediately thought "Teddy Hart"?

Being that I don't know that much with what happens backstage in the wrestling world,I have no choice but to heed this guys words.

"So perhaps he's right about there's maybe 99% of indy wrestlers that would not make it to the WWE,being that there is probably only five indy wrestlers that cares to try the WWE"

I'll respectfully disagree with that Crazyfoo4U. You'd be surprised how little most 'name' indy wrestlers actually make. When you factor in the travel expenses, lost opportunities, wear & tear they put on their bodies, along with future medical problems, it's really quite sad. That doesn't even touch on the amount of guys how work for free as ticket sellers (a growing necessity as the business continues to contract).

Without the perceived 'light at the end of the tunnel' of one day working for Vince and finally making real money, I don't see much motivation for athletic guys with talent to even bother with the business at all. Many with the most actual potential, realizing the slim odds of success, low initial rate of return, & immense risks endemic in the lifestyle (injuries/drug addictions/death rates) quickly choose to forgo the career all together.

This is one of the reasons why today's talent pool is so paper thin...and the future of the industry as a whole, is so sadly bleak.