Attn OG video editors/cinematographers

Sup gents..im dabbling in video journalism and recently completed a quick promo video for my friend's album he has coming out..if I post a link can I get some honest opinions? Phone Post

I'm a sound fx/dialogue editor, I'd be interested to take a look.

Sex Chicken -

I'm a sound fx/dialogue editor, I'd be interested to take a look.

Cool..thanks a ton man..its not super interesting but let me know what you think from a technical standpoint



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eXVK72Xcxl8&feature=youtube_gdata_player Phone Post

I think all in all it has a good feel. Here's a few pointers from a cinematographer.

- interview framing at 1:20, try giving him less head room so his eyes are not in the center of the frame. Also, there are times when you don't see his eyes, this creates a disconnect. Try having him look just barely to the side of the lens to connect with the audience.

- the opening movement is nice, could be better with a small slider (try jag35.com, they have a cheap $99 slider)

-some kind of editing hic up at 1:44? Looks like you had some b roll you were going to use, the overlapped the current clip but you left about 2 frames of the old clip

-some kind of odd dissolve in the interview around 1:40, although people won't notice it, they will feel it.

-looks like his light was adjusted at 1:28, maybe he was sitting in front of a computer that was turned on?

That's me just watching it twice. I can't turn the volume up in my hotel room right now. Another thing to consider is less talking head. Cut to his interview for emotional beats and to add some variety, other than that "say dog, see dog". If he says he creates beats beats, cut to him creating beats. If he says he makes music for people to drink and smoke to, cut to people drinking and smoking. Granted that widens the scope of your project ten fold but it does add a lot. Hope this helped. Phone Post 3.0

Sex Chicken - 


I'm a sound fx/dialogue editor, I'd be interested to take a look.


You are in Toronto too, correct?

Pistolwhip_619 - I think all in all it has a good feel. Here's a few pointers from a cinematographer.

- interview framing at 1:20, try giving him less head room so his eyes are not in the center of the frame. Also, there are times when you don't see his eyes, this creates a disconnect. Try having him look just barely to the side of the lens to connect with the audience.

- the opening movement is nice, could be better with a small slider (try jag35.com, they have a cheap $99 slider)

-some kind of editing hic up at 1:44? Looks like you had some b roll you were going to use, the overlapped the current clip but you left about 2 frames of the old clip

-some kind of odd dissolve in the interview around 1:40, although people won't notice it, they will feel it.

-looks like his light was adjusted at 1:28, maybe he was sitting in front of a computer that was turned on?

That's me just watching it twice. I can't turn the volume up in my hotel room right now. Another thing to consider is less talking head. Cut to his interview for emotional beats and to add some variety, other than that "say dog, see dog". If he says he creates beats beats, cut to him creating beats. If he says he makes music for people to drink and smoke to, cut to people drinking and smoking. Granted that widens the scope of your project ten fold but it does add a lot. Hope this helped. Phone Post 3.0

Definitely some good advice. ..thanks alot for the pointers. .the random dissolve was used to try to cover up some shaky camera work and yeah youre 100% correct he was in front of a computer which was a bit of a mistake and i didn't notice until editing.. this was my first project and I was the interviewer,camera guy and sound guy so it didn't come out quite as clean as I would've liked. .I really appreciate the feedback vtfu!...also may I ask how you got started and what you do currently? Phone Post

wanderpage siljackson -
Pistolwhip_619 - I think all in all it has a good feel. Here's a few pointers from a cinematographer.

- interview framing at 1:20, try giving him less head room so his eyes are not in the center of the frame. Also, there are times when you don't see his eyes, this creates a disconnect. Try having him look just barely to the side of the lens to connect with the audience.

- the opening movement is nice, could be better with a small slider (try jag35.com, they have a cheap $99 slider)

-some kind of editing hic up at 1:44? Looks like you had some b roll you were going to use, the overlapped the current clip but you left about 2 frames of the old clip

-some kind of odd dissolve in the interview around 1:40, although people won't notice it, they will feel it.

-looks like his light was adjusted at 1:28, maybe he was sitting in front of a computer that was turned on?

That's me just watching it twice. I can't turn the volume up in my hotel room right now. Another thing to consider is less talking head. Cut to his interview for emotional beats and to add some variety, other than that "say dog, see dog". If he says he creates beats beats, cut to him creating beats. If he says he makes music for people to drink and smoke to, cut to people drinking and smoking. Granted that widens the scope of your project ten fold but it does add a lot. Hope this helped. Phone Post 3.0

Definitely some good advice. ..thanks alot for the pointers. .the random dissolve was used to try to cover up some shaky camera work and yeah youre 100% correct he was in front of a computer which was a bit of a mistake and i didn't notice until editing.. this was my first project and I was the interviewer,camera guy and sound guy so it didn't come out quite as clean as I would've liked. .I really appreciate the feedback vtfu!...also may I ask how you got started and what you do currently? Phone Post

I got started as an editor in community college classes. I did that for about 2 years. When I went to cut my demo reel it looked like garbage because all the footage I had was from community college students. So I decided to pick up a super cheap DSLR and learn photography as it was much cheaper than a camcorder but most of the same principals. I did that for awhile and feel in love. Shortly after that I bought a 7D and started running Craigslist hard. I would take any gig I possibly could as a DP, Gaffer, Grip or Ac. I would respond to over 100 ads a week and probably only get a gig a week through that if I was luckily. Free or paid anything it didn't matter. I would shoot projects for my friends and actively followed forums. I moved from San Diego, to Long beach and then finally to where I live now in Hollywood gathering footage for my reel. Ill pm you my reel as it has my phone number and email addy that I don't want linked to battles that happen on mats. Phone Post 3.0

Pistolwhip_619 -
wanderpage siljackson -
Pistolwhip_619 - I think all in all it has a good feel. Here's a few pointers from a cinematographer.

- interview framing at 1:20, try giving him less head room so his eyes are not in the center of the frame. Also, there are times when you don't see his eyes, this creates a disconnect. Try having him look just barely to the side of the lens to connect with the audience.

- the opening movement is nice, could be better with a small slider (try jag35.com, they have a cheap $99 slider)

-some kind of editing hic up at 1:44? Looks like you had some b roll you were going to use, the overlapped the current clip but you left about 2 frames of the old clip

-some kind of odd dissolve in the interview around 1:40, although people won't notice it, they will feel it.

-looks like his light was adjusted at 1:28, maybe he was sitting in front of a computer that was turned on?

That's me just watching it twice. I can't turn the volume up in my hotel room right now. Another thing to consider is less talking head. Cut to his interview for emotional beats and to add some variety, other than that "say dog, see dog". If he says he creates beats beats, cut to him creating beats. If he says he makes music for people to drink and smoke to, cut to people drinking and smoking. Granted that widens the scope of your project ten fold but it does add a lot. Hope this helped. Phone Post 3.0

Definitely some good advice. ..thanks alot for the pointers. .the random dissolve was used to try to cover up some shaky camera work and yeah youre 100% correct he was in front of a computer which was a bit of a mistake and i didn't notice until editing.. this was my first project and I was the interviewer,camera guy and sound guy so it didn't come out quite as clean as I would've liked. .I really appreciate the feedback vtfu!...also may I ask how you got started and what you do currently? Phone Post

I got started as an editor in community college classes. I did that for about 2 years. When I went to cut my demo reel it looked like garbage because all the footage I had was from community college students. So I decided to pick up a super cheap DSLR and learn photography as it was much cheaper than a camcorder but most of the same principals. I did that for awhile and feel in love. Shortly after that I bought a 7D and started running Craigslist hard. I would take any gig I possibly could as a DP, Gaffer, Grip or Ac. I would respond to over 100 ads a week and probably only get a gig a week through that if I was luckily. Free or paid anything it didn't matter. I would shoot projects for my friends and actively followed forums. I moved from San Diego, to Long beach and then finally to where I live now in Hollywood gathering footage for my reel. Ill pm you my reel as it has my phone number and email addy that I don't want linked to battles that happen on mats. Phone Post 3.0

Hahahahah cool ill check it out. ... Thanks again og brethren Phone Post

I think it is well edited well put together video, but from an audio point of view. How was he mic'd for the interview? If you've got a clean isolated mic, I'd push him up in the mix. He's a quiet talker and he trails off in the mix a couple of times. If you have isolated mics, you can send them vox track and I'll clean them up for you. Right now it's like he's talking over the music. With a clean dialogue track you could what he's saying front and center and ride the music around his dialogue.

Sex Chicken -

I think it is well edited well put together video, but from an audio point of view. How was he mic'd for the interview? If you've got a clean isolated mic, I'd push him up in the mix. He's a quiet talker and he trails off in the mix a couple of times. If you have isolated mics, you can send them vox track and I'll clean them up for you. Right now it's like he's talking over the music. With a clean dialogue track you could what he's saying front and center and ride the music around his dialogue.

Thanks for the feedback. .I used a zoom H1 on a boom mic stand just above his head. ..I wanted to go with a lav mic but I felt like if it was visible it would ruin the flow of the video.... his voice was recorded independent of the music but getting them both at the right level in post was quite the challenge (as you can tell)..do you think increasing the gain on the track with his voice wouldve helped or in those cases should I stop and ask him to speak up?

Man before this project I had no idea how difficult audio is...I commend you sir Phone Post

Yeah I would take his vox track, and clean it up. Then see how far you can push it in the mix. If it is mic'd close you can be prettiy agressive, but if it's married to the room hums/tones, you won't be able to push it very far without also adding roomtone/ machine hum to the final output. If you don't use a lav, you can experiment with planting a mic (if as in this case your subject is stationary) or what you need is a really directional shotgun mic, that someone can aim at his mouth from off camera. If you are using a wide spectrum mic like a zoom on a stand, you'll get that (in the room) feel. It's not bad, but it just limits you as far as how agressive you can be in pushing his dialogue. It probably would have helped to get him to project more as well. Your video sounds fine, it's just his dialogue is fighting with the music, and because he's a bit of a mumbler you're losing the definition in his voice in places.

Good luck and let me know if I can help out.

Sex Chicken -

Yeah I would take his vox track, and clean it up. Then see how far you can push it in the mix. If it is mic'd close you can be prettiy agressive, but if it's married to the room hums/tones, you won't be able to push it very far without also adding roomtone/ machine hum to the final output. If you don't use a lav, you can experiment with planting a mic (if as in this case your subject is stationary) or what you need is a really directional shotgun mic, that someone can aim at his mouth from off camera. If you are using a wide spectrum mic like a zoom on a stand, you'll get that (in the room) feel. It's not bad, but it just limits you as far as how agressive you can be in pushing his dialogue. It probably would have helped to get him to project more as well. Your video sounds fine, it's just his dialogue is fighting with the music, and because he's a bit of a mumbler you're losing the definition in his voice in places.

Good luck and let me know if I can help out.

That makes perfect sense. .thanks again brotha...oh last question. .how do you feel about the program audacity? It was free so I downloaded it but didn't use it but is it worth trying in future projects? Phone Post

I've never used audacity. I'm only really familiar with Pro-Tools.