BBQ THREAD...

I'm sitting in my office reading the BBQ issues of Gourmet magazine (my industry's slow time of year) and thought this would be a good time to strat a BBQ thread.

Do you  make your own sauce or buy?

Gas or coal?

Sauce or dry rub?

Pork, beef, chix or fish?

Slow cook or light it up?

Any tips you want to share or are you a selfish pig with a great recipe and you think not telling us makes you superior in some way?

Stubs rub and sauce.

I'm not patient enought for a smoker. But, I do have one. This is a cool site.

http://www.virtualweberbullet.com/index.html

Do you  make your own sauce or buy?

Both, but Cattleman's or Masterpiece always works well.

Gas or coal?

Coal, gas is like training wheels.

Sauce or dry rub?

Depends on the situation. I use both on my ribs.

Pork, beef, chix or fish?

yes yes yes yes

Slow cook or light it up?

BBQ = SLOW....

Any tips you want to share or are you a selfish pig with a great recipe and you think not telling us makes you superior in some way?

Indian spices rock for bbq.

What % of chips to coals?

Anyone care to share a marinate recipe?

I've been marinating with coke, ketchup, garlic salt and lemon pepper for chicken recently.

chokeyou you have mma mail

I don't really "BBQ". I just grill.

Do you make your own sauce or buy?

Buy Corky's

Gas or coal?
Gas. I don't believe you get any flavor benefit from charcoal or wood unless you're slow-cooking for hours, which I don't really do.

Sauce or dry rub?
Cook w/ rub, sauce at the table for those who want it.

Pork, beef, chix or fish?
All of the above, plus shrimp, veggies, and wild game.

Slow cook or light it up?
Depends on the meat. I cook a steak as fast as possible. Beer Can Chicken takes over 2 hours.

Any tips you want to share or are you a selfish pig with a great recipe and you think not telling us makes you superior in some way?
Check out Steven Raichlen's books: How to Grill and BBQ Bible. Also, see the Food & Wine Ground for some good stuff, including a recipe for Trailer Park Burgers.

Am I a fag for starting this thread here, instead of in the Food & Wine Ground?
Pretty much.

great bbq site for rubs and sauces

http://www.bbq-porch.org/recipes/html/C2.htm

my current favorite narinade:

soy sauce
garlic
ginger
scallions
black pepper

Jimmy,

 

use my real email. You have it, right?

BBQ should be a required monthly activity in the summer.

Im talking like they arrest you if you dont participate.

Marinade for what?

For salmon I like to use honey and soy sauce (4 parts each) and wasabi (1 part).

For steaks I use a store-bought peppercorn marinade form Grill Creations. I haven't cooked a steak without it since I tried it.

For pork chops, I like to use the brine from this Alton Brown recipe.

One of my favs is to track down some Tandurie (sp) powder. I'm actually going by this Indian place in Culver City at lunch to pick some up.

I rub the all over a tri-tip and let it sit over night.

I realize the Indian spice on beef thing is tough for some but man does it work well.

Like the other guy said, I would call what I do grilling. True BBQ needs to be smoked.

Do you make your own sauce or buy?

Buy. there is a local BBQ sauce called Head Country that makes some fantastic stuff. I like it better than the big named, franchise BBQ sauce. Tried making my own once and was dissapointed.

Gas or coal?

Use both but prefer gas. You can control the temp better and it's just easier. You do get a flavor benefit with charcoal but it's just not worth the time to me.

Sauce or dry rub?

Sauce and marinade. There is a Black peppercorn marinade I love for chicken that I just buy at the store and mix up at home. Only takes like 30 minutes and you're good to grill. I found a recipe for a steak marinade online that is the bombdiggity. Best steaks I've ever had. I won't even eat steak at a resteraunt anymore cause mine is better:

1 cup vegetable oil
1/2 cup soy sauce
1/3 cup red wine vinegar
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
3 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon freshly ground black pepper
2 tablespoons Dijon-style prepared mustard
1 onion, sliced
2 cloves garlic, minced

Marinade for at least 24 hours.

Pork, beef, chix or fish?

Everything but fish. I'm more of a baked/fried fish guy and it just seems to dry out too much on the grill.

Slow cook or light it up?

S-L-O-W

Tips:
I started making a grilled onion blossom when I make steaks and it comes out great. Get a yellow onion (they are sweeter) and make at least 6 cross cuts all the way to the bottom but being carefull not to cut it completely so it still is attached to the root stub. Put butter and minced garlic (or garlic salt) on the petals and close it up. Don't have to get every petal but at least the first layer or two. Wrap the whole thing up tight in foil and place on the grill till it's nice and soft. Super easy and goes great with a lot of grilled foods.

Zilla, do you peel the onion the whole way?

I want to use my smoker this weekend, something that takes about 6 hours.

I want it to be beef.

Give me some ideas.

Pat,

Tri-tip.

Do you make your own sauce or buy?

I make it from time to time, but there are so many good store bought sauces out there, it hardly seems worth the effort anymore.

Gas or coal?

Both. I often use gas for porous things like certain vegetables, bread and so on. Smoke can make things like mushrooms too bitter. Lump charcoal is what I use for grilling, most of the time. For BBQ and smoking, usually a combination of lump charcoal and hardwood. I also often use a direct hardwood fire for making steaks.

Sauce or dry rub?

Marinade + dry rub, usually. Gotta have sauce on ribs, though, IMO.

Pork, beef, chix or fish?

yes, please

Slow cook or light it up?

Well, BBQ is slow cooking, by definition. The only things I usually grill quickly are steak, vegetables, chicken breasts, fajitas, shrimp and some types of fish that dry out too easily like Mahi Mahi. Most everything else gets the slow indirect treatment. 30-45 minutes is more than enough for small things like jalepeno poppers and most fish. 2 hours for medium pork loins, chicken quarters and such. It pretty much goes up exponentially from there. 12-20 hours for a brisket., etc.

Any tips you want to share or are you a selfish pig with a great recipe and you think not telling us makes you superior in some way?

Three of the most underused and underrated things in the kitchen: fruit juices, soft drinks and brown sugar. Explore your marinade options...so many things are quite intuitive when you really think about it..the problem is most people don't think about it. Everyone knows about fish and lemon, but most people have never tried fish and orange juice or pineapple juice or anything else. Ever marinade lamb or pork in apple juice? Didn't think so. It's awesome. Soft drinks are great too, especially for pork and brisket.. Dr. Pepper, Coke, etc. All great.. they have sugar, spices, water and salt all built in. And brown sugar is just great on damn near everything.

One of my favs is to track down some Tandurie (sp) powder. I'm actually going by this Indian place in Culver City at lunch to pick some up.

Tandoori.. yeah, I started using this stuff as well, just in the last month. It is fucking great, IMO. I went to this BBQ festival thing and this Indian guy had made BBQ'd salmon with a Tandoori spice rub and I damn near shit myself because it was so good and so unique (at least to my tastes).

It definitely adds a different flavor, if you're looking to branch out from the traditional Texas/Tennessee/Carolina BBQ flavors.

You can actually make it yourself, as it is just a combination of some common spices like cinnamon, nutmeg, black pepper, cayenne, cumin seed and some other stuff. You probably have most of it around the house already.

I want to use my smoker this weekend, something that takes about 6 hours.

I want it to be beef.

Yeah, tri tip is a good idea. Maybe beef ribs. If you want to throw something else in there, consider a big pork loin. They usually don't take more than 4 hours @ 220 F, even for a big one. Small ones can be done in as little as 2 hours.