Breaking new medical treatment for injury recovery

Okay, hear me out. I know at first you'll think it's crazy.

Coma therapy. Whenever you're experiencing an unpleasant recovery from something, you have the option of undergoing a medically-induced coma until recovery is complete. For example, say you get a septoplasty. By all accounts recovery sucks. So you'd just go to sleep for the week or two it took for the packing to come out and the swelling to go down. That way when you wake up, you're fully recovered and good to go and pain-free.

I know what you're thinking. Medically-induced comas carry great risks. Not so in this day and age. If we can't safely put people to sleep and wake them up, we don't deserve to exist as a species. I place my full faith in science.

It costs a lot of money. It's medicine in America. It already costs a lot of money. You're not going to get it paid off before you die anyway.

I for one think this is a great idea. I'd love to skip the unpleasant recovery process from many illnesses and injuries and just wake up healthy and ready to go.

I have one. It's creating the solutions of the future for the problems of today.

Fuck that. I had a major surgery last march. Laying around the house smoking weed and popping pain pills made for a nice way to spend a few weeks. Phone Post 3.0

It would still be nice to have the option, Patriarchy.

Interdasting...I like it. Phone Post 3.0

A burn victim could sleep through all the painful debridement.

I'll wait until they can pipe HBO or Netflix directly into my brain at the same time. For sure I'd be like the one guy who was in a coma for years and conscious the whole time. Phone Post 3.0

Soul Gravy - It would still be nice to have the option, Patriarchy.
Yeah, the burn victim comment a few after this convinced me. Phone Post 3.0

RE: burn contracture.

A burn victim's body may still be manipulated, whether by another person or machine. The upside is that the victim is unconscious and does not have to endure the excruciating pain of any of their treatment.

Soul Gravy - RE: burn contracture.

A burn victim's body may still be manipulated, whether by another person or machine. The upside is that the victim is unconscious and does not have to endure the excruciating pain of any of their treatment.
Interesting. Phone Post 3.0

There is a form of "coma therapy" that is used for addicts....ultra rapid heroin detox

Doctors put you to sleep while cleansing your body of the stuff that causes the addiction

You wake up after 6-8 hrs and you have minimal or no withdrawal symptoms

They do this for brain injuries. Phone Post 3.0

GucciGucciGucci - There is a form of "coma therapy" that is used for addicts....ultra rapid heroin detox

Doctors put you to sleep while cleansing your body of the stuff that causes the addiction

You wake up after 6-8 hrs and you have minimal or no withdrawal symptoms

Excellent! The benefits of coma therapy continue to grow and grow!

Res ipsa loquitar - 
Soul Gravy - RE: burn contracture.

A burn victim's body may still be manipulated, whether by another person or machine. The upside is that the victim is unconscious and does not have to endure the excruciating pain of any of their treatment.


LOL.



Ok. I dont think you realize how much work is required to perform "passive range of motion" for a long period of time, and machines lack that fine touch required to safely perform (maybe in the future!!). 



 



Active and passive range of motion are both very important...The MOUNTAIN of literature is not in your favor.



 


You make a good point. However, it would seem to me when an option such as coma therapy exists, and with its potential to provide the patient with a pain-free recovery, instead of stating it won't work due to certain factors, we would attempt to address those issues so that it can work.

TryhardNobody - Risks of a medically induced coma

Like most medical procedures, an induced coma carries some risks. "One of the consequences that we do know of is an increased risk of infection," Souter said. Chest infections are particularly common, since a coma greatly affects the cough reflex, which helps to clear secretions from the lungs.

Barbiturates, too, can diminish the immune response, though there's "not a great wealth of data on that," Souter said. And preventative use of antibiotics is not usually recommended due to their association with the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, aka "superbugs."

There is also some controversy over the need for medically induced comas: A number of studies have found limited benefits from barbiturate-induced comas, particularly among people over age 40. A 2004 report from the journal Anaesthesia found that "the potential benefits of barbiturate coma have to be balanced against the risks. These complications need to be considered when an adverse neurological outcome seems likely."

http://www.livescience.com/39483-what-is-a-medically-induced-coma.html

I would certainly be willing to accept the risks inherent in participating in an induced coma recovery, as I'm sure many, many people would.

If chest infections are a major issue, then we learn how to solve that issue.

Going by this article, http://healthland.time.com/2011/08/04/under-the-knife-study-shows-rising-death-rates-from-general-anesthesia/ , I would certainly accept the risk of a seven in one million chance of dying. In addition, the more prevalent the procedure is, the more acclimated the medical field will become to it, which should further reduce those odds in time.

MMAdotCOM - Couldn't nurses just move your body for you while u stay in coma? Phone Post 3.0

Yes! Not to mention that the mobility of, say, a severely burned person is going to be very limited anyway even with consciousness. With patient in a state of unconsciousness, the range of motion could be increased beyond what would normally be available.

Res ipsa loquitar - 
Soul Gravy - 
MMAdotCOM - Couldn't nurses just move your body for you while u stay in coma? Phone Post 3.0

Yes! Not to mention that the mobility of, say, a severely burned person is going to be very limited anyway even with consciousness. With patient in a state of unconsciousness, the range of motion could be increased beyond what would normally be available.


Actually No. Nurses are not trained in how the body moves or how to manage movement and  this would be out of their scope of practice. This is under the scope of physcal therapy.



 



You seriously have no clue what you are talking about OP.


So either train nurses how to manage movement or hire more physical therapists. That problem = just solved.

Res ipsa loquitar - 
Soul Gravy - 
Res ipsa loquitar - 
Soul Gravy - RE: burn contracture.

A burn victim's body may still be manipulated, whether by another person or machine. The upside is that the victim is unconscious and does not have to endure the excruciating pain of any of their treatment.


LOL.



Ok. I dont think you realize how much work is required to perform "passive range of motion" for a long period of time, and machines lack that fine touch required to safely perform (maybe in the future!!). 



 



Active and passive range of motion are both very important...The MOUNTAIN of literature is not in your favor.



 


You make a good point. However, it would seem to me when an option such as coma therapy exists, and with its potential to provide the patient with a pain-free recovery, instead of stating it won't work due to certain factors, we would attempt to address those issues so that it can work.


OK. How do you safely manage the portion of the machine that attaches to the person for movement? the potential to do more damage from friction is high. How many attachments will be required for full range of motion? The increase in atatchments increases the potential to cause even more damage.



How would you mobilize areas like the neck, or smaller areas like the hand/fingers? How do you manage the avoidance of causing damage to nervous tissue? etc. I am sure there are even more things I am missing.



 



 



 



 


How are these things avoided with manual motion management?

Worked for superman after doomsday beat that ass, didn't it? Phone Post 3.0