Building a house tme

As title states about to lock into a contract to start building my first home any tips or help be appreciated rented for 2 years and currently still am, build should take 6-12 months

Are you married? If so, good luck with that shit.

Don't
Do
It.

If you do, make your budget 75% of what you have to spend so you will only wind up spending 110% of what you can afford

Just did it myself.  My buddy and I were the general contractors.  Not recommended for the weak of heart.  I've never done it myself.  He built his own house.  Saved about 150K by not paying some other schmuck to pretend that they care more about the workmanship than me.  Some tips below:

- Hired a designer to replace my wife for decisions on colours, tiles, cabinets, etc.  Best 4K I spent ever spent.  We ended up on non-speaking terms, but better her than my wife right?  She fucked up tile order and started blaming me for not giving her the dimensions properly.  I'm an engineer, I can add...  

- Don't trust anyone when they say "I'll build it like my own house."  I've been to a bunch of their homes and I'd punch them in the face if they did my house like their own.

- Them trades guys... they are not your friend.  You be nice to them and they will think they can slack off and not do as good a job as you expect.  If you want to thank them, get them a case of beer after everything is done... otherwise keep them on their toes.

- Roll up your sleeves and do some work.  Keep a clean site.  Make sure everyone keeps it clean.  Lead by example and pick up the trash too.  Lot of them don't care and the inside of your walls and ducts will be full of garbage.  I bought the best shopvac from home depot and vacuumed up every night - so every night for 8 months.

- Minor issues like a crooked stud, minor framing - fix it yourself.  You will waste a lot of time and effort trying to convince these guys that something is wrong - they are just avoiding have to redo the work.

- I doubled up the floor joists under my kitchen and master tub.  The floors don't move under the massive weights of the island slab and a full tub.  Rock solid buddy.  

- Internet is your friend - I slept maybe 4 hours a night - I spent countless hours researching techniques and material choices to ensure that things were done right.

- Prewire Cat5e or Cat6 ethernet for camera system.  You won't regret it.  Being able to see my house/kids/cars give me great peace of mind.

Anyways thats all for now.  PM me if you have any specific questions.

T

Oh year, budget wise, I was 20% over.  It didn't have to be, but this is my forever home, so some things didn't look quite so nice in reality as they did on paper...  plus I have very expensive tastes. Make sure you ain't hurting if you hit that number.  So many things come up during the build.


And if you not gluing and screwing your floors down, then might as well quit now.

 

 

Haha a lot of negative ideas here i thought this was gonna be fun

We've built 3 now. It's great as long as you and wife are on same page. Had great experiences, great homes and would build again. It always cost more than we planned - but we planned to spend more than we planned. Lots of stuff you can't redo later and most of the stuff you think you'll redo later, you won't. So just do it all now, suck it up and get the perfect house for you that you can afford. 

Stronghold - Don't
Do
It.

If you do, make your budget 75% of what you have to spend so you will only wind up spending 110% of what you can afford

Not the don't do it part, but budget in more.  

 

I did a renovation 5 years ago.   Moved out, gutted the house.  I was at a $125k budget to convert an old 1,000 sqft farm house to 2300.  

Sewage, not to code, redo it all, HVAC, update.  Then you'll see 800 things outside of original plans that would be better. 

 

Toss in weather delays, and a simple build is $15k over.  If I had a ground up build, mine would have been an extra $30k

Don't pay that final amount until you are 100% satisfied with the work.

How taste nailed it. Do as much work as you can yourself.

This is how all construction projects lag and fail. Help!

Its hard and workers contractors overestimate abilities and schedules. Any help should be appreciated and those few hours saved weekly will make the difference between close to on schedule and 2 years of hell, that you think will never end.

Otherwise I would say hire a guy that's just responsible and his main job is to help clean up, and do basic stuff.

I've seen more ppl put a serious strain on marriage building or remodeling than I can count. Its nearly 100%. You will need extra help no matter what your contractor says. He has to sell himself.

But main rule of construction is...

Double time, double price.

HowtastemyPP -

Just did it myself.  My buddy and I were the general contractors.  Not recommended for the weak of heart.  I've never done it myself.  He built his own house.  Saved about 150K by not paying some other schmuck to pretend that they care more about the workmanship than me.  Some tips below:

- Hired a designer to replace my wife for decisions on colours, tiles, cabinets, etc.  Best 4K I spent ever spent.  We ended up on non-speaking terms, but better her than my wife right?  She fucked up tile order and started blaming me for not giving her the dimensions properly.  I'm an engineer, I can add...  

- Don't trust anyone when they say "I'll build it like my own house."  I've been to a bunch of their homes and I'd punch them in the face if they did my house like their own.

- Them trades guys... they are not your friend.  You be nice to them and they will think they can slack off and not do as good a job as you expect.  If you want to thank them, get them a case of beer after everything is done... otherwise keep them on their toes.

- Roll up your sleeves and do some work.  Keep a clean site.  Make sure everyone keeps it clean.  Lead by example and pick up the trash too.  Lot of them don't care and the inside of your walls and ducts will be full of garbage.  I bought the best shopvac from home depot and vacuumed up every night - so every night for 8 months.

- Minor issues like a crooked stud, minor framing - fix it yourself.  You will waste a lot of time and effort trying to convince these guys that something is wrong - they are just avoiding have to redo the work.

- I doubled up the floor joists under my kitchen and master tub.  The floors don't move under the massive weights of the island slab and a full tub.  Rock solid buddy.  

- Internet is your friend - I slept maybe 4 hours a night - I spent countless hours researching techniques and material choices to ensure that things were done right.

- Prewire Cat5e or Cat6 ethernet for camera system.  You won't regret it.  Being able to see my house/kids/cars give me great peace of mind.

Anyways thats all for now.  PM me if you have any specific questions.

T

Damn good first post. 

One thing I've noticed is the initial structure time to build.

When there is a super legit framing crew, it goes up almost over night. Good framers that care about their cuts will speed things up dramatically IMO. These guys just built a house in like 6 months a block over, start to finishing soon. Bad weather too.

I could tell by the pace of saws and hammering thy didn't fuck around, and were just dialed as a team.

It was all journeymen and the contractor worked just as much /hard. Seemed to make a huge difference

Approach it like this is the only time in your life that you will do it - it probably is.

As such, make sure there's plenty of buffer in your budget. You will naturally find things that you want to add along the way and any cost estimates you get up front are the LOWEST OF LOWBALLS. Remember that. Its endemic in the industry: its how the contractor or trades get you to commit.

As already mentioned, nobody is your friend and somebody has to be the bad guy. You can be nice while being the bad guy, but somebody has to ask the hard questions and make a stand on things like quality and cost.

Since the nature of the relationship between you and the builder/trades puts you at a disadvantage, make sure you're picking a crew that has built your type of house before. Its not just stick, bricks and glass....every type of house has its own idiosyncracies. A heart surgeon does heart surgery....not brain surgery. Same with houses. Get a guy who has built your style of house before.

If you don't, its just going to be problems and you have limited negotiating leverage. Your options are somewhat binary. The most forceful thing you can do to the project is shut it down if you want to play hardball....but you really don't want to do that because you want your house built. Aside from that, you're left to the whims of the builder and the amount you can influence him. See above, get a builder who has done your style of house before and can do it again so its easy.

Good luck. You'll probably get what you want but at a higher cost than you ever expected and you won't want to do it again

As mentioned above, if it is within your means to do so, be your own general contractor. 

Make sure you get signed contracts for everything. I'd recommend a standard AIA contract form, and just make sure to define the scope well. Don't release any payments without lien releases. 

Once you know what you want, look at "value engineering" options to see where you can reduce cost without sacrificing quality or aesthetics. For example, you decide you want a bunch of LED can lights. Great idea. Depending on what you select, they can run a couple hundred dollars each. Or instead you can buy a standard $12 can light with an LED retrofit kit for another $30 or less. Maybe you can save a few grand going with concrete countertops instead of granite and get a similar look. Lots of savings ideas to consider, and you can be in control of that process. Keep whatever savings you come up with in your contingency budget, and ideally this will cover or at least help offset some of the cost overruns you are surely to see. 

Plan for the future. If you think you will want to build an outdoor kitchen later, go ahead and rough in your gas, electric, and water now - or at least get them stubbed out of the house and into the general area. 

Good luck with it all. 

  1. Use SIPS, it'll save you time and money over traditional framing.

    2. Overbuild it, building codes are minimums not maximums.


Beyond so much shit information on here. 

 

For starters to the asshole saying contractors are bullshit, you are a fucking idiot. 

 

Most trades, if you can find any don't want to deal with anyone that have no idea what the fuck they are doing and most contractors know people in the trades capable of doing the work for you at a good price. 

 

Secondly what country do you live in, if it's canada you are going to need a lot of building permits and those can only be pulled by people with actual trade tickets. 

 

I've walked into and straigh out of jobs that where started by know it all first time home builders that either fucked up relations with all the tradesman or cut corners everywhere and had the building inspector come in and shut down the entire site until everything was done correctly. 

 

I am currently building two home with a building cost of 8 million dollars each in Canada and can show you proof if you need.

 

You can be your own contractor but it doesnt hurt to get a builder that will manage everything for you and you can pay for that. 

 

Your building supplier can give you a big discount if you set up an account with them, a lot of places negotiate for your business that includes wood suppliers as well as other materials. 

 

Don't pay for big jobs in cash no matter how tempting the discount is becuase the work isnt garanteed. 

 

If you build it right, what ever you pay will come back to you and it will be worth more than the costs asuming you dont fuck anything up and have to do things twice all the time. 

 

I can show you houses that cost double what they should have because people tried to cut corners and paid the price. 

 

Do it right the first time and you can call around to see what the average set price is for jobs and trades and if you get someone that is well below that cost, its not worth the risk. 

 

Clean job site, dont upset your neighbors and dont fuck over the trades or think you know whats best when it comes to what needs to get done. 

 

I know a home owner with a half built home in my town because she pissed everyone off and got black balled and now has to get guys in from two towns over and set them up with a place to stay while they work.

 

Do it right, get advice from a professional contractor and meet with a few and they will let you know where you can save money and how you can loose money. Most good contractors will share this advice with you for free if you meet with them and ask them. 

 

Don't listen to anyone that tells you how to cut corners and save money. 

 

Everyones got an online review of their business but the best would be going to the hardware supplier and asking the staff and manger especilly what their rep is. 

 

What ever you put into this place will be worth more by the time its all said and done, so dont be a cheap fuck you cheap fuck :) 

 

Also if you get people in their to work and its all off the books, and they get hurt...LAWSUIT

 

Pay the money, and consider yourself a laborer for the project wherever the trades need you.  

 

Make sure everyone is supplied materials wise so there is no dicking around when they show up, but that is the hardest thing to do. 

 

Get your home ispected at various stages and if you are in a decent country with building standards this should happen at various stages throughout the build. 

 

Concrete forming for foundation inspection, framing inspection, plumping inspection, electrical inspection, insulation inspection, and final inspection. 

 

Thats what you need to know in an overview, don't make any of the mistaked listed above and you wont waste any money. 

 

 

You can do it, but you need to speak to a good contractor, or a good builder, or project managment company. 

 

There are many rules in place to insure work needs to be set to a certain standard complying with local building codes so that you dont end up getting your home to fail an inspection should it come time to sell it and then you end up having to knock off that cost in the final sale and it protects future home buyers. Just had a friend buy a house one town over and the inpection showed none of the framing was set to code and he got all that amount of valued work taken off the sale price and did the work himeself because he is a red seal carpenter and saved so much money while the home seller lost all of his proffit. 

 

Constuction isnt something to just start at the level of building a home that can withstand the weather and time and keep your family safe. Lots of do it yourselfers loose their homes to fires and weather all the time. 

 

You got this, but you need to speak to a few professionals in your area as well as people in your neighborhood that had work and homes built. You can go to job sites under constructuon and talk to job site managers in many places and im sure they would love to break up the work day and talk to you for a few minutes. 

 

Good lck 

 

Lastly, you need to book trades in advance because most people are busy right now that summer building just started, most companies dont just have people waiting around to start big projects like a house. You are going to have alot of people waitng around if you dont manage this correctly and your time may go on and on with very little progress being made and other trades walking off the job. 

 

Trade management, timeline management, materials management, these are all things a professional can forsee. 

 

You can pay a management fee for a project and that is a trade in itself. 

Lots of people have been told contractors are a scam and its just not the case, they are usually people that have worked in construction a long time and have made a business out of time management. Its not a scam, it can be a life saver, time saver and money saver. You can be that guy and make it work and save all kinds of money, but the odds are against you overall. 

 

I hope you get it dont right, safely and under budget. All I ask is that you see this project as a big deal and find the people acrodingly to help you along. 

Good luck and post pics when you can