changing training for mma

should fighters try to be as well rounded as they can be, or should fighters work on implementing their gameplan and bringing their opponent to their realm.

right now, everyone is crosstraining to be the best boxer/muy thai, wrestler, and jiu jits guy they can be.  should they, instead focus only on bringing out their strength so that they can save time.

so, if you have a jiu jitsu guy.  should he really try to get good at striking, or should he focus on getting the fight to the ground anyway he can and then try and work his strength from there?

as i see it, we are getting guys who are decently rounded, but when they get a specialist, sometimes that specialist can take them out of where they like to be.

im not saying abandon training the other things, but i am saying to reevaluate how to train

I was at a BJ Penn seminar and he said for MMA the best thing to do was try and take your base art - the one you're naturally good at as far as you can.

I.E. Strikers need to be the best strikers they can and same with grapplers.

That wasn't to say ignore other training but to play to your strengths

Anyways that's what BJ said

Personally I suck at all ranges of fighting so it doesn't make a difference to me.

i like bjs idea

i like bj's too

I think it depends on how long you've been training in a certain area. If you've been kickboxing for 6 years and want to do mma you're obviously going to keep striking as your strength.Some guys like Fedor and GSP are damn good in everything.

The real question is what if you don't have a "base" art? Focus on one area intensely for a while or do less and focus on two?

seriously though, who doesn't like a nice bj?

I was brooding over this recently.

After all the fights Ive seen Ive come to the conclusion that two things are clear.

You MUST be competantly well rounded to have even a chance in today's MMA game at the elite levels.

Not everyone is going to be "good" at the 3 main areas of fighting.

That leads me to deduce that the best logical training plan is to train your weak areas in a way that they complement and allow you to keep the fight in your stronger area.

Of course you can always wind up getting paired with someone whos a cross over expert in your area and your weak areas will be loads better than theirs so you def have to be able to change gears too.

YF has a good point there. However, I think you should train takedowns and td defence whether you are striker or grappler. For grappler it is important to take the fight on the ground, and strikers goal is to keep it standing. So wrestling is important for everyone.

So, basicly you should be able to take the fight there, where your biggest advantage is.

Jack of all trades Master of nothing.It actually makes sense and the more I train I am starting to agree.

I would like to fight MMA eventually but I do not come from any background whatsoever.I have been doing Jui Jitsu for a year in a half now.I have had numerous injuries that have sidelined me for the most part of that time though.I am 30 so I feel like I am in a race against time so I have been doing Jiu Jitsu,started a Boxing coach and working with some Wrestlers.I feel like I am just spinning my wheels cause I am trying to learn 3 Arts at once...

I have figured out that my love is Jiu Jitsu and Submissions and I am gonna focus on that and hopefully build a good base and go from there.Even do a Grappling Comp when I get decent enough.

I think it just matters with the individual person.You can have a St Pierre or a Rich Franklin who both came from no background but are some of the most well rounded fighters ever.

I remember an old interview where Pat Miletich said he quit Wrestling and Jiu JItsu and for a year did nothing but Muay Thai.

I'd say if your at brownbelt level Shinya Aoki might be one to follow.

If he cant out strike them or get a takedown he pulls guard which seems to be a great strategy so far because if he didnt pull guard he'd most likely get smashed on the feet or gas out using repeated takedowns.

Rickson once said you should learn striking but only to improve your grappling game if your a grappler.

IMO, you have to have a solid cross-section of skills , solid enough so that you can compliment your strentghs. That is, a jiu-jitsu player needs to able to strike and defend strikes well enough so that he CAN bring the fight to his realm, where as a Muay Thai expert needs to able to grapple and defend well enough to keep the fight in his realm. I think all fighters eventually specialize, even those that come from not one particular background.

you're only as strong as your weakest link..

Here is the best Shinya video I could find

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p4tNd5ZsSNs

great video

Info, what's up brother...?

It depends on how long you have for this fight...If you have less than a month or a few weeks, than I would stick to what you are best at...

Afterwards though, I would train to include boxing and muay thai...Bring wrestling in to your jiu-jitsu training so you have a balanced workout...This way, you are continually working on your weaknesses...I strongly feel that a well-balanced game is the way to go in MMA...

I can understand the argument of playing to your strengths in a fight, but you may very well have to adapt that strategy because what if your opponent is better than you at your strength? Then you have limited options to resort to in a fight and it could be a very long night...

A good fighter will know how to identify your strength...If that's all you can do, then that might be a problem...If you give your opponent trouble wherever the fight is (on the ground or standing), then you can win in many different ways...You are harder to beat because you are good at all the areas...

Develop your base style thoroughly...Get it sharp and keep it strong, but nourish the other areas of your game as well...Develop a great foundation...Who knows, maybe with some training, down the road, you may find out that you are a better striker than you thought you could ever be...Who knows?

Training in various styles also prevents burn out from training straight Jiu-Jitsu all the time...Mixing things up keeps it interesting and easy to maintain a tough workout schedule...

IMO depends on what phase of training you're in. Closer to fights, you train your gameplan/strategy, and that should be getting and keeping the fight in your strongest realm. Farther out from fights, you have more time to work your weaknesses and what I like to call the "supporting" aspects to your strengths.

C

I agree with the get good at what your good at kind of attitude.  However, I was a local show and was shocked by one match where there was a good striker vs. a good grappler.  The grappler ducked and really looked VERY uncomfortable with the striker.  He ultimately got KTFO.  You must respect the other methods, and train to implement YOUR gameplan in each of the situations.

when its calling to me?

From: shmuckothemighty
Date: 01/11/07 02:21 PM
Member Since: 12/04/2005
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I was at a BJ Penn seminar and he said for MMA the best thing to do was try and take your base art - the one you're naturally good at as far as you can.

I.E. Strikers need to be the best strikers they can and same with grapplers.

That wasn't to say ignore other training but to play to your strengths

Anyways that's what BJ said

Personally I suck at all ranges of fighting so it doesn't make a difference to me.

 

 

Sounds like perfect advice!