Cooking oil, TME

What's the best kind of oil to use for cooking?

I heard corn oil is the devil but then someone said it lowers cholesterol.
Then I hear olive oil is the best.
then someone else said canola oil is the healthiest.... But then someone else said canola oil is healthy until heated, then its dangerous.

Wtf. Phone Post 3.0

Nutiva coconut oil.....I can eat that straight from the jar. Look it up, its incredible. Phone Post 3.0

bacon or pork fat or fuck your mother

Just depends on what you're doing with it. I use mostly coconut or olive oil but use peanut oil when cooking at high temps.

I NEVER use canola oil ever since i stunk up my house putting it in a deep fryer. Phone Post 3.0

esque -


Industrial vegetable (and seed) oils are highly processed and should be avoided. I get not caring when eating out (if it´s fairly rare), but don´t use them yourself.



The best overall cooking oil is coconut oil, hands down. Very heat stable and legitimately healthy (due to lauric acid for instance).



You can also use (grass-fed) butter and real olive oil (in dark containers), but they´re not as heat stable. Avocado oil, palm oil and macademia nut oil are also decent alternatives.



Avoid:




  • Canola Oil


  • Soybean Oil 


  • Corn Oil


  • Cottonseed Oil


  • Rapeseed Oil


  • Sunflower Oil


  • Sesame Oil


  • Grapeseed Oil


  • Safflower Oil


  • Rice Bran Oil

This guy knows what up, voted up. Phone Post 3.0

Hmmm so canola oil is bad....but various articles say its good for u. Phone Post 3.0

When I grill chicken I use grapeseed oil and shit comes out dooope.

I heard avocado oil is supposed to be good for searing steaks, did it once and it was terrible so I haven't touched the stuff since.

Z NEDCMK1 -


The best overall cooking oil is coconut oil, hands down. Very heat stable



It is a great cooking oil, but it isn't heat stable. It smokes at 350 degrees.

When u say "it smokes" do you mean literally black smoke will come from the stove as I'm cooking my chicken?

Thanks Phone Post 3.0

Z NEDCMK1 -


Olive Oil has a stronger flavor, so use it when you want that in your food. Don't use for high temp cooking.



Grapeseed Oil is flavorless and has a very high smoke temp, it is excellent for cooking, esepcially high temp cooking like sering a steak in cast iron.



 

Alternating these is how I roll Phone Post 3.0

Coconut oil, lard, and ghee. Can't go wrong with any of these.

High saturated fats that aren't as vulnerable to breaking down in higher heats. We use virgin coconut oil and lard, actually beef tallow or fat, for cooking, and EVOO for things like salads. Phone Post 3.0

Z NEDCMK1 -


You can also use (grass-fed) butter



What difference does this make in butter?

Well, the cows are fed their natural diet of grass and hay as opposed to shitty corn. Changes the composition of the butter and has a greater CLA and Vitamin K2 count, something typically missing from conventional butters. Same applies to meat. Grass fed beef has higher omega 3 levels than conventional meat. Phone Post 3.0

jkd_guy - Hmmm so canola oil is bad....but various articles say its good for u. Phone Post 3.0
It's junk. It has high omega levels, but goes rancid quickly. Lack of healthy saturated fats (sounds like an oxymoron, but contrary to popular belief, saturated fats aren't bad for you) lead to oxidation of these oils.

If you can, get some coconut oil or even grass fed butter. If you really want, try using some beef fat. You can get it pretty cheap online, and it lasts a long time! Phone Post 3.0

Z NEDCMK1 -
kyle223 - Coconut oil, lard, and ghee. Can't go wrong with any of these.

High saturated fats that aren't as vulnerable to breaking down in higher heats. We use virgin coconut oil and lard, actually beef tallow or fat, for cooking, and EVOO for things like salads. Phone Post 3.0


I love virgin coconut oil, especially when cooking things like chickpeas in red curry. It is excellent for thai and indian cooking.



It does impart a strong flavor though and wouldn't work in some dishes.



It also burns very easily, so really only good for cooking done under 350 degrees, and best below 300.

Despite the lower smoke point than regular olive oil, or something like avacado oil, I believe I recently saw that oils with high saturated fats are still far better than some of the other oils that may have higher smoke points. I'm not expert, but something related to the saturated fats being less vulnerable to breaking down than polyunsaturated fats in vegetable oils. This is why something like coconut oil or lard is great for cooking. Very high saturated fats. Phone Post 3.0

Z NEDCMK1 -
kyle223 - 
Z NEDCMK1 -

You can also use (grass-fed) butter

What difference does this make in butter?

<span class="User-337090" id="userPost54101731">Well, the cows are fed their natural diet of grass and hay as opposed to shitty corn. Changes the composition of the butter and has a greater CLA and Vitamin K2 count, something typically missing from conventional butters. Same applies to meat. Grass fed beef has higher omega 3 levels than conventional meat. <img alt="Phone Post 3.0" border="0" src="/images/phone/droid.png" style="vertical-align:middle;" /></span></blockquote>

 

I need ot look into this.

 

My wife doesn't appreciate my love of butter as much as I would like her too.

She also isn't a huge fan of buying the more expensive and tastier European style butters, or local butters that are a deep yellow rather than white.

From a texture and flavor standpoint, I much prefer Prime over grassfed.


 

I can't afford grass fed beef, at something like $20 a lb. Screw that. So, we stick to grass fed ground beef, where it's only $8 a lb for us. Much cheaper. Also, conventional steaks would be higher fat, thus more marbling and greater flavor. However, I like the grass fed beef for the health benefits and the fact that they're typically pasture raised, so they get to roam around. I won't support feeding cows with corn in a cage that they can't move around in. Phone Post 3.0

I meant to say I can't afford grass fed steak. More than double the price of grass fed beef, which is already double the price of conventional beef. Phone Post 3.0

Z NEDCMK1 -
kyle223 - 
Z NEDCMK1 -
kyle223 - Coconut oil, lard, and ghee. Can't go wrong with any of these.

High saturated fats that aren't as vulnerable to breaking down in higher heats. We use virgin coconut oil and lard, actually beef tallow or fat, for cooking, and EVOO for things like salads. Phone Post 3.0


I love virgin coconut oil, especially when cooking things like chickpeas in red curry. It is excellent for thai and indian cooking.



It does impart a strong flavor though and wouldn't work in some dishes.



It also burns very easily, so really only good for cooking done under 350 degrees, and best below 300.

Despite the lower smoke point than regular olive oil, or something like avacado oil, I believe I recently saw that oils with high saturated fats are still far better than some of the other oils that may have higher smoke points. I'm not expert, but something related to the saturated fats being less vulnerable to breaking down than polyunsaturated fats in vegetable oils. This is why something like coconut oil or lard is great for cooking. Very high saturated fats. Phone Post 3.0


That could be true, I wouldn't argue it.



I am jusdt speaking from a utility point of view. It imparts flavor and burns over 350, so not so great for searing, or when your dish needs a neutral flavored oil.

It's weird, because we use either the Trader Joe's or Whole Foods coconut oils when we cook, and we don't notice any flavor that it may impart. However, a couple of times we've had some people over, they were able to pick out the coconut flavor and wouldn't eat the food (bitches). Maybe we're used to it, but I always thought that decent coconut oils shouldn't taste like anything. Phone Post 3.0

Z NEDCMK1 -


Virgin coconut oils will taste like coconut, refined coconut oil will have very little flavor and a higher smoke point. Maybe you are using refined.

Virgin coconut oil is what we use. I'm probably just used to it since we use it for most meals. Phone Post 3.0

Z NEDCMK1 -


I will definitely check it out, thanks esque.



 



The coconut flavor (and fats) from Trader Joes Virgin Coconut Oil is so good I put a scoop of it in kale smoothies made with Kale, coconut water, and pineapple. Its like a pina colada!

Same. Love coconut oil in smoothies. My wife started making the best thing ever recently. We eat healthy, but desserts are always tough since she has a gluten allergy, and I try to avoid it as well. Anyways, she found a recipe somewhere for coconut avocado pudding. Probably sounds gross, but it's incredible. Seriously one of the best desserts I've had, and it's really good for you.

Two avocados (we double the recipe so we use four, but everything here is based on using two avocados)
One frozen banana
Few tablespoons coconut milk or oil
Couple tablespoons of cocoa
Dash of salt

We put everything in our blendtec for 30 seconds, then distribute it into four bowls for four servings, and put it in the fridge for at least a couple of hours to cool and settle. I can eat it like this all night, but my wife likes it sweeter so she used some coconut sugar or cane sugar. To me, it tastes just like chocolate pudding, but way healthier ingredients. In fact, I like it better than pudding since there's a subtle banana flavor. So creamy and delicious.


We basically eat Phone Post 3.0

Oh, also add something like a half cup of water before you mix it in the blender, otherwise it will be too thick to blend. Phone Post 3.0

esque - How much do you guys pay for coconut oil? The most common type here is $20. Some Asian stores sell small jars for $10 that lasts for a week or two. Phone Post 3.0
Where the hell are you? I think we pay $5.99 for a 1 lb jar at TJ's, and $6.99 or $7.99 at Whole Foods. We just get their store brand, organic virgin coconut oil. Not sure if you're able to access Amazon, but they have some huge jars of the Nutiva brand for pretty cheap. Something like 5 pounds for $30 or something like that. Phone Post 3.0