Disclosing current salary

Has anyone ever disclosed a number that they thought was indicative of their total compensation package when asked what their current base salary was from an hr department? Let's say you make 175k base but with bonus and stock options that pushed you to say 225k.  What was the conclusion? Did you get the increased level of compensation? Did they renegotiate? Did they rescind the offer?

 

Thanks guys.

Buy a bluename, get back to posting food porn, and then we'll talk

I have always been honest (but I have always been fairly compensated so I didn't feel like I had to lie).

I've always left that blank. It's not their business. 

And no one has ever followed up asking about it. 

groundfighter2000 - Buy a bluename, get back to posting food porn, and then we"ll talk

Damnit gf!! I dont do that anymore :/

Well they made an offer and I accepted the offer and then they asked for current w2.

DomenicVelluso -

Well they made an offer and I accepted the offer and then they asked for current w2.

I have never heard of a request like that

Why are you constrained by their rules? Color outside the lines. 

You can answer that question any way you like as long as you have some backup. Don't let them fuck with you if you were getting money. 

UltimateKeyboardWarrior -
DomenicVelluso -

Well they made an offer and I accepted the offer and then they asked for current w2.

I have never heard of a request like that
Me either.

DomenicVelluso -

Well they made an offer and I accepted the offer and then they asked for current w2.

Also if they made an offer in writing that is binding. Don't let them give you verbal (nothing) and then ask for a W2. 

Talk to the person who interviewed you if you you feel this is going south. Ask why they're playing games. 

Give them a number of what you expect to be paid. If the base is too low, negotiate until you're happy or walk. You never want to be at a job where you're expecting a bonus, or worse, need one.

I tried doing the "x salary + bonus" thing and didn't get any traction. What'll likely happen is HR will use the fact that you brought it up to sell you on a lower rate because they have this 'incredible' bonus plan that's way better than what you had at your old job.

When shit goes south, that will be the first thing on the chopping block.






Its a multinational corporation. During the background check they verified my salary with all my previous employers. I asked the background check company not to contact my current employer, hence they asked for a w2. I refused to submit my w2. I was informed that if I did not submit my w2 my offer would be rescinded. I submitted my w2 and now I am waiting for the company to respond to me. The rate on my w2 is lower than I disclosed. Am I screwed?

Bump

I have had my W2's requested. I simply said no and told them if they wanted to rescind the offer that was their call. It was a bluff, and they hired me anyway.

 

It was funny because other hires complained about it during our company orientation. One of the senior staffers told me later that my defiance was one of the reasons the company put me on a fast track. They wanted killers, not sheep.

 

I also made it a point to renegotiate my contract every 6 months, getting 16-20% bumps every time. If the company culture rewards success and an agressive style, go for it.

DomenicVelluso - 

Its a multinational corporation. During the background check they verified my salary with all my previous employers. I asked the background check company not to contact my current employer, hence they asked for a w2. I refused to submit my w2. I was informed that if I did not submit my w2 my offer would be rescinded. I submitted my w2 and now I am waiting for the company to respond to me. The rate on my w2 is lower than I disclosed. Am I screwed?



You are only screwed if you have turned in your resignation to your current employer.



The company that is trying to hire you will either A) figure it out and rescind the offer, or B) not figure it out and you will be hired.



I have worked for two of the 20 largest global companies.  Neither asked for W-2's.  That is really weird.  One did do a hair sample drug test.  That was weird by itself.

They can legally just ask for the info from your employer if they want.

Your current or former employer does not have to divulge unless it is requested from a legal entity or the government. Most employers will not divulge.


There are things that legally can be asked when checking current or former employers, income is one. They cannot however ask "what kind of employee" a person is/was or the reason they are no longer employed (if relevant). They legally do not have to divulge anything except if you are currently employed or the to/from dates of when you were employed. This may vary state to state, I'm not sure.

CaptainWoody - They can legally just ask for the info from your employer if they want.

Your current or former employer does not have to divulge unless it is requested from a legal entity or the government. Most employers will not divulge.


There are things that legally can be asked when checking current or former employers, income is one. They cannot however ask "what kind of employee" a person is/was or the reason they are no longer employed (if relevant). They legally do not have to divulge anything except if you are currently employed or the to/from dates of when you were employed. This may vary state to state, I'm not sure.

They can ask what kind of employee a person was or why they were terminated. There is no law against it. Employers don't answer because there is a risk for a defamation suit if they answer with an untruthful response. Thus, most employers opt to reduce the risk of suit by having a policy of not answering. But they could if they wanted to.

WikiTheWalrus - 
CaptainWoody - They can legally just ask for the info from your employer if they want.

Your current or former employer does not have to divulge unless it is requested from a legal entity or the government. Most employers will not divulge.


There are things that legally can be asked when checking current or former employers, income is one. They cannot however ask "what kind of employee" a person is/was or the reason they are no longer employed (if relevant). They legally do not have to divulge anything except if you are currently employed or the to/from dates of when you were employed. This may vary state to state, I'm not sure.

They can ask what kind of employee a person was or why they were terminated. There is no law against it. Employers don't answer because there is a risk for a defamation suit if they answer with an untruthful response. Thus, most employers opt to reduce the risk of suit by having a policy of not answering. But they could if they wanted to.



I think this is correct. 



I was going by when I was a supervisor years ago in a different field then I am now. It was probably company policy to not divulge anything, that's why I was told I could not say anything other than employment history. 



I would get calls asking about certain people that were total pieces of shit and had been written up multiple times before tey were fired...all I could say was, they were employed from this date to this date.



I did get 1 or 2 calls for people that never worked there ever and I told them I had no record of this person ever working at this company. That was strange.



 



So even if you were fired and a bad employee I think most places aren't going to say jack shit, for one, you aren't their problem anymore and two, it's not worth the risk of a defamation lawsuit.  

RSOs... make me happy