Does anyone agree with "Chain migration" in US?

Thread title says it all. I think it's preposterous and not sure how such a ridiculous thing as chain migration came to be, but I'm completely willing to listen to the rationale of anyone who thinks CM is a good thing. 

 

Anyone?

No, it’s absurd. Leftists will cry about fairness and a better life though 

Democrats like it as a way to get more Democrat voters.

If they come here legally vested, I don't care if they all want to live in a circus tent.

Pretty sure any rational minded person would say it's absurd and a terrible idea.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chain_migration

It doesn't seem bad.  What's the problem?

Different forms of chain migration in American history[edit]

Different groups of immigrants to the United States throughout its history have employed different strategies to enter, work, and live in the United States. Some groups, such as Eastern European Jews, emigrated in families en masse from the Russian and Austro-Hungarian Empires of the late nineteenth century. Many groups have immigrated to the United States throughout history via chain migration. These social networks for migration are universal and not limited to specific nations, cultures, or crises. Chain migration is an overarching theme of many of the immigration experiences in American history. One group of immigrants to the English colonies in North America (and later the United States) was African slaves brought over forcibly; the circumstances of their migration do not fit the criteria of chain migration of free labor.

Italian immigration in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century relied on a system of both chain and return migration. Chain migration helped Italian men immigrate to the United States for work as migrant laborers. Italians generally left Italy due to dire economic conditions and returned wealthy by Italian standards after working in the United States for a number of years. Italian immigrants were called ritorni[7] in Italy and grouped with other Southern and Eastern European migrant laborers under the term “birds of passage” in America. However, after the passage of the Immigration Act of 1924, return migration was limited and led more Italians to become naturalized citizens. The networks that had been built up by information and money due to chain and return migration provided incentives for Italian permanent migration.

Mexican migration to the United States followed some of the same patterns as Italian immigration. The history of Mexican migrant labor in America and return migration to Mexico produced a network that allowed for chain migration once more restrictive legislation was passed hardening the border between the two nations. Chain migration based on the knowledge gained from migrant labor experience and relationships with American residents or citizens again provided some ease of immigration. From 1942 to 1964, the American government sanctioned Bracero Program allowed hundreds of thousands of Mexican migrant workers to “familiarize themselves with U.S. employment practices, become comfortable with U.S. job routines, master American ways of life, and learn English,” thereby creating social and human capital.[8]After the Hart–Celler Act of 1965 disbanded the Bracero Program, the incentives and effects of chain migration perpetuated undocumented immigration to the United States. Absent any of the economic incentives, the Mexican American immigration relationship has a longstanding history and the effects of chain migration are pervasive when considering the number of Mexican American citizens, legal residents, and undocumented residents. Social capital provided by chain migration has helped perpetuate Mexican migration, whether it is undocumented or legal.

While immigrants from European nations during the period before the McCarran–Walter Act of 1952 were able to immigrate legally if with relative levels of ease depending on country of origin, the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 barred almost all Chinese from immigrating to the United States. Nonetheless, many Chinese immigrants arrived in America by obtaining false documents. The Chinese Exclusion Act allowed the Chinese Americans already settled in America to stay and provided for limited numbers of family members of Chinese Americans to immigrate with the correct paperwork. This loophole and the fateful 1906 earthquake that destroyed San Francisco’s public records provided Chinese immigrants, almost entirely men, with the potential to immigrate with false documents stating their familial relationship to a Chinese American.[9] These Chinese immigrants were called “paper sons,” because of their false papers. “Paper sons” relied on networks built by chain migration to buy documentation, develop strategies for convincing authorities on Angel Island of their legal status, and for starting a life in America.

 

Copy and pasted from Wikipedia

robbie380 - 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chain_migration

It doesn't seem bad.  What's the problem?


You end up getting a bunch of dumbass family members rather than picking and choosing the best potential immigrants.

robbie380 - 

Different forms of chain migration in American history[edit]

Different groups of immigrants to the United States throughout its history have employed different strategies to enter, work, and live in the United States. Some groups, such as Eastern European Jews, emigrated in families en masse from the Russian and Austro-Hungarian Empires of the late nineteenth century. Many groups have immigrated to the United States throughout history via chain migration. These social networks for migration are universal and not limited to specific nations, cultures, or crises. Chain migration is an overarching theme of many of the immigration experiences in American history. One group of immigrants to the English colonies in North America (and later the United States) was African slaves brought over forcibly; the circumstances of their migration do not fit the criteria of chain migration of free labor.

Italian immigration in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century relied on a system of both chain and return migration. Chain migration helped Italian men immigrate to the United States for work as migrant laborers. Italians generally left Italy due to dire economic conditions and returned wealthy by Italian standards after working in the United States for a number of years. Italian immigrants were called ritorni[7] in Italy and grouped with other Southern and Eastern European migrant laborers under the term “birds of passage” in America. However, after the passage of the Immigration Act of 1924, return migration was limited and led more Italians to become naturalized citizens. The networks that had been built up by information and money due to chain and return migration provided incentives for Italian permanent migration.

Mexican migration to the United States followed some of the same patterns as Italian immigration. The history of Mexican migrant labor in America and return migration to Mexico produced a network that allowed for chain migration once more restrictive legislation was passed hardening the border between the two nations. Chain migration based on the knowledge gained from migrant labor experience and relationships with American residents or citizens again provided some ease of immigration. From 1942 to 1964, the American government sanctioned Bracero Program allowed hundreds of thousands of Mexican migrant workers to “familiarize themselves with U.S. employment practices, become comfortable with U.S. job routines, master American ways of life, and learn English,” thereby creating social and human capital.[8]After the Hart–Celler Act of 1965 disbanded the Bracero Program, the incentives and effects of chain migration perpetuated undocumented immigration to the United States. Absent any of the economic incentives, the Mexican American immigration relationship has a longstanding history and the effects of chain migration are pervasive when considering the number of Mexican American citizens, legal residents, and undocumented residents. Social capital provided by chain migration has helped perpetuate Mexican migration, whether it is undocumented or legal.

While immigrants from European nations during the period before the McCarran–Walter Act of 1952 were able to immigrate legally if with relative levels of ease depending on country of origin, the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 barred almost all Chinese from immigrating to the United States. Nonetheless, many Chinese immigrants arrived in America by obtaining false documents. The Chinese Exclusion Act allowed the Chinese Americans already settled in America to stay and provided for limited numbers of family members of Chinese Americans to immigrate with the correct paperwork. This loophole and the fateful 1906 earthquake that destroyed San Francisco’s public records provided Chinese immigrants, almost entirely men, with the potential to immigrate with false documents stating their familial relationship to a Chinese American.[9] These Chinese immigrants were called “paper sons,” because of their false papers. “Paper sons” relied on networks built by chain migration to buy documentation, develop strategies for convincing authorities on Angel Island of their legal status, and for starting a life in America.

 

Copy and pasted from Wikipedia


Why did you post this wall of text?

I think as the population rises closer to 350 million, while the welfare system is unsustainable, social security is in grave trouble, education benchmarks can't be met, and the country has historically high deficits and debt, it is fair to re-evaluate and change our immigration policy. 
 
We can't simply have a realistic immigration policy based on the needs of the country as they existed in the early 1900's. It is a totally different world now, totally different economy, and totally different strain on resources. Our standard immigration policies have outlived their usefulness are are now burdansome.
 

David@accu -
robbie380 - 

Different forms of chain migration in American history[edit]

Different groups of immigrants to the United States throughout its history have employed different strategies to enter, work, and live in the United States. Some groups, such as Eastern European Jews, emigrated in families en masse from the Russian and Austro-Hungarian Empires of the late nineteenth century. Many groups have immigrated to the United States throughout history via chain migration. These social networks for migration are universal and not limited to specific nations, cultures, or crises. Chain migration is an overarching theme of many of the immigration experiences in American history. One group of immigrants to the English colonies in North America (and later the United States) was African slaves brought over forcibly; the circumstances of their migration do not fit the criteria of chain migration of free labor.

Italian immigration in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century relied on a system of both chain and return migration. Chain migration helped Italian men immigrate to the United States for work as migrant laborers. Italians generally left Italy due to dire economic conditions and returned wealthy by Italian standards after working in the United States for a number of years. Italian immigrants were called ritorni[7] in Italy and grouped with other Southern and Eastern European migrant laborers under the term “birds of passage” in America. However, after the passage of the Immigration Act of 1924, return migration was limited and led more Italians to become naturalized citizens. The networks that had been built up by information and money due to chain and return migration provided incentives for Italian permanent migration.

Mexican migration to the United States followed some of the same patterns as Italian immigration. The history of Mexican migrant labor in America and return migration to Mexico produced a network that allowed for chain migration once more restrictive legislation was passed hardening the border between the two nations. Chain migration based on the knowledge gained from migrant labor experience and relationships with American residents or citizens again provided some ease of immigration. From 1942 to 1964, the American government sanctioned Bracero Program allowed hundreds of thousands of Mexican migrant workers to “familiarize themselves with U.S. employment practices, become comfortable with U.S. job routines, master American ways of life, and learn English,” thereby creating social and human capital.[8]After the Hart–Celler Act of 1965 disbanded the Bracero Program, the incentives and effects of chain migration perpetuated undocumented immigration to the United States. Absent any of the economic incentives, the Mexican American immigration relationship has a longstanding history and the effects of chain migration are pervasive when considering the number of Mexican American citizens, legal residents, and undocumented residents. Social capital provided by chain migration has helped perpetuate Mexican migration, whether it is undocumented or legal.

While immigrants from European nations during the period before the McCarran–Walter Act of 1952 were able to immigrate legally if with relative levels of ease depending on country of origin, the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 barred almost all Chinese from immigrating to the United States. Nonetheless, many Chinese immigrants arrived in America by obtaining false documents. The Chinese Exclusion Act allowed the Chinese Americans already settled in America to stay and provided for limited numbers of family members of Chinese Americans to immigrate with the correct paperwork. This loophole and the fateful 1906 earthquake that destroyed San Francisco’s public records provided Chinese immigrants, almost entirely men, with the potential to immigrate with false documents stating their familial relationship to a Chinese American.[9] These Chinese immigrants were called “paper sons,” because of their false papers. “Paper sons” relied on networks built by chain migration to buy documentation, develop strategies for convincing authorities on Angel Island of their legal status, and for starting a life in America.

 

Copy and pasted from Wikipedia


Why did you post this wall of text?

Sorry...I'll make sure to condense things into 140 characters.  Is this too long?

Chain migration is actually a really beautiful thing. I've seen it happen in real time.

When an immigrant comes here, what they do is work multiple jobs and do nothing but save enough money to buy a house. Then they work even harder, saving every penny to get their family members over, one by one. Before long there'll be about 6-8 of them living in the house, each one working, saving more money, and bringing more family over. When there are too many people in the house, they pool their money and buy a second house, and move half the family into it. And then the process starts all over again, until a family network of hundreds of people living in dozens of houses (usually in the same neighborhood) is slowly ported over into North America over the course of a few generations.

These are hardworking, law-abiding, tax paying citizens who pay their dues and happily contribute to the system. The only horrible implication is that they're probably brown, which means they will eventually displace whites as the majority ethnic class. But there's really nothing horrible about that, unless you're a racist.

Honestly, it's a pretty admirable thing to see, this familial community unit, bound by blood loyalty, devotion and spirit that only immigrant families seem to have. It simply does not exist in the self-preoccupied, self-focused, stark individualism of Americans, that champions getting as far away from your family as quick as possible and wanting nothing to do with them for as much of the rest of your life.

The rest of the world thinks that model of living is weird. It's only North America where parents and the kids live separate. In other cultures, families are a lot closer together, with everyone, from grandparents to relatives, usually living under the same roof.

And don't say you value your privacy. In the age of surveillance capitalism and social media, you have none.

StrikingMMA - Democrats like it as a way to get more Democrat voters.
Bingo. Lol at people thinking this would be done to "help people"

jcblass - 

I think as the population rises closer to 350 million, while the welfare system is unsustainable, social security is in grave trouble, education benchmarks can't be met, and the country has historically high deficits and debt, it is fair to re-evaluate and change our immigration policy. 


 


We can't simply have a realistic immigration policy based on the needs of the country as they existed in the early 1900's. It is a totally different world now, totally different economy, and totally different strain on resources. Our standard immigration policies have outlived their usefulness are are now burdansome.


 


This

No. 

Masakyst - 

Chain migration is actually a really beautiful thing. I've seen it happen in real time.

When an immigrant comes here, what they do is work multiple jobs and do nothing but save enough money to buy a house. Then they work even harder, saving every penny to get their family members over, one by one. Before long there'll be about 6-8 of them living in the house, each one working, saving more money, and bringing more family over. When there are too many people in the house, they pool their money and buy a second house, and move half the family into it. And then the process starts all over again, until a family network of hundreds of people living in dozens of houses (usually in the same neighborhood) is slowly ported over into North America over the course of a few generations.

These are hardworking, law-abiding, tax paying citizens who pay their dues and happily contribute to the system. The only horrible implication is that they're probably brown, which means they will eventually displace whites as the majority ethnic class. But there's really nothing horrible about that, unless you're a racist.

Honestly, it's a pretty admirable thing to see, this familial community unit, bound by blood loyalty, devotion and spirit that only immigrant families seem to have. It simply does not exist in the self-preoccupied, self-focused, stark individualism of Americans, that champions getting as far away from your family as quick as possible and wanting nothing to do with them for as much of the rest of your life.

The rest of the world thinks that model of living is weird. It's only North America where parents and the kids live separate. In other cultures, families are a lot closer together, with everyone, from grandparents to relatives, usually living under the same roof.

And don't say you value your privacy. In the age of surveillance capitalism and social media, you have none.


"When an immigrant comes here, what they do is work multiple jobs and do nothing but save enough money to buy a house. Then they work even harder, saving every penny to get their family members over, one by one. Before long there'll be about 6-8 of them living in the house, each one working, saving more money, and bringing more family over. When there are too many people in the house, they pool their money and buy a second house, and move half the family into it. And then the process starts all over again, until a family network of hundreds of people living in dozens of houses (usually in the same neighborhood) is slowly ported over into North America over the course of a few generations."

It sounds like you are describing the proliferation of a virus.

Masakyst -

Chain migration is actually a really beautiful thing. I've seen it happen in real time.

When an immigrant comes here, what they do is work multiple jobs and do nothing but save enough money to buy a house. Then they work even harder, saving every penny to get their family members over, one by one. Before long there'll be about 6-8 of them living in the house, each one working, saving more money, and bringing more family over. When there are too many people in the house, they pool their money and buy a second house, and move half the family into it. And then the process starts all over again, until a family network of hundreds of people living in dozens of houses (usually in the same neighborhood) is slowly ported over into North America over the course of a few generations.

These are hardworking, law-abiding, tax paying citizens who pay their dues and happily contribute to the system. The only horrible implication is that they're probably brown, which means they will eventually displace whites as the majority ethnic class. But there's really nothing horrible about that, unless you're a racist.

Honestly, it's a pretty admirable thing to see, this familial community unit, bound by blood loyalty, devotion and spirit that only immigrant families seem to have. It simply does not exist in the self-preoccupied, self-focused, stark individualism of Americans, that champions getting as far away from your family as quick as possible and wanting nothing to do with them for as much of the rest of your life.

The rest of the world thinks that model of living is weird. It's only North America where parents and the kids live separate. In other cultures, families are a lot closer together, with everyone, from grandparents to relatives, usually living under the same roof.

And don't say you value your privacy. In the age of surveillance capitalism and social media, you have none.

Chain immigration is the reason why most major cities in Florida are turning into dirty 3rd world looking shitholes, so beautiful !