Easiest way to reinsulate a room?

So, I have a room in my house that is cold as hell. Pretty sure the radiator in there is on the return or something as it’s one of the last ones to heat up and the room seems drafty. 

Thinking about tearing all the Sheetrock out and reinsulating the entire room but wondering if there is an easier way to do it. Suggestions?

Rent it out to a fat person. 

Line it with aluminum foil.

 

See if your utility company will do a free or cheap home inspection. They'll check out the windows and insulation and hvac system . They may even use a FLIR camera to look for insulation gaps in the wall. The report will give you a better idea of what you can do before spending money on tearing out and replacing walls.

Plug your dryer vent with lint, put a load of laundry in to dry and go to town. Repeat as needed.

Is this by chance the north wall ? What Mayfield said , and probably looking at replacing windows in that room .

I have the same problem in den. Luckily it's the only room with a fireplace so I can at least get it to warm up.

if you have money to spend spray foam

Depending on how it's insulated, you can drill a hole between every stud and put in that blow in insulation. I dont know how well that would work?

if its just drafty, look into sealing the windows better (caulk? ) and you can up plastic to seal the windows (they sell it at home depot, etc.)

on top of that you can put up thermal curtains, or if you're really nuts, hang THICK moving blankets or something over the windows.

look up this old house window insulation on youtube... they show things you dont think of, like insulating around wall outlets and light switches which also let in drafts

D.I.L.L.I.G.A.F. - 

if its just drafty, look into sealing the windows better (caulk? ) and you can up plastic to seal the windows (they sell it at home depot, etc.)

on top of that you can put up thermal curtains, or if you're really nuts, hang THICK moving blankets or something over the windows.

look up this old house window insulation on youtube... they show things you dont think of, like insulating around wall outlets and light switches which also let in drafts


This is all 'do first stuff'.

If you are going to rip walls then figure out if you'll get someone to come in and spray or if you'll be putting in batted insulation yourself. The upside of foam (not blown fiberglass) is that it totally stops drafts, but it can be pricey to get someone to come in and do it so get a quote.

If you do it yourself get a couple cans of spray foam and hit joints, window seams, and cracks between 2x4's that you can't chink.

How big is the room?

bakobell -

How big is the room?

Maybe 11X12. It’s like a spare bedroom. 

How much is the spray foam to have someone come in and do that?

Nitecrawler -
bakobell -

How big is the room?

Maybe 11X12. It’s like a spare bedroom. 

How much is the spray foam to have someone come in and do that?

How many walls are outside facing?

Asbestos

bakobell -
Nitecrawler -
bakobell -

How big is the room?

Maybe 11X12. It’s like a spare bedroom. 

How much is the spray foam to have someone come in and do that?

How many walls are outside facing?

Two, although the third wall has the entry hall from the front door on the other side of it. 

Buy a space heater for that room

Wait till you see a spider in the room, then catch the spider on fire.

Be sure you have an old mattress laying around in the cold room

If it seems drafty try and see where the leaks are coming from. Also what's above it? Is there an attic and how sealed and insulated is it? Remember heat rises and will escape if you have nothing keeping it in. You can also lay thermal barrier up in your attic/crawl space to keep the heat in along with insulation.

Tearing down drywall to reinsulate isn’t terribly expensive. But it’s messy. And a little time consuming. You’d only have to do your two outside walls. I’d pop your head into the attic and see what the situation is like up there first. Blow some more insulation up there and try to seal up any light fixtures to reduce heat loss.