efficacy of strength training in injury prevention

Ninjaplata - the latest research is showing that continuous motion (passive or active) can reverse arthritis, as well as intermittent compression and distraction (activity, basically) stimulates healthy cartilage metabolism in joints (Steve maxwell has been saying this years).

So a strength training routine with the goal of safety and longevity in mind (aka not German volume training or any other extreme professional level program) can have incredible benefits for joint health, injury prevention, metabolic health and so on.

source: I work in physical therapy Phone Post 3.0

Cool!

Strength training is the only way to maintain bone density when losing weight and/or aging.

If you care about your long term health on and off the mat you need to lift bro. Phone Post 3.0

Neal Zumbro - I recently started an Instagram account called @submit_backpain because I battled "back pain" for years (blue belt thru black) only to find out my hips and legs were tight and overtrained causing muscular imbalances. So I've dedicated myself to yoga, Pilates, weights, stretching, etc and get tons of question from others students at my academy and around town about stretches for bjj. So this account I started shows lots of the stuff I'm doing to prevent these imbalances from too much bjj specialization. Sorry for the hijack, good thread! Phone Post 3.0
I couldn't find your Instagram page, Is it still up? Phone Post 3.0

Can anybody point me to injury prevention weightlifting programs? Almost all programs I find are geared towards powerlifters i.e. increasing strength by adding weight to the big compound lifts. Stronglifts, 3x5, starting strength, 5/3/1 etc. I'll be 38 soon and while I still feel okay doing compound lifts, I don't wanna mess up my body. BJJ is still more important to me than lifting. Right now I'm doing 5/3/1 and I feel good, except for the fact that I'm stiff as hell for two days after squat day :)

The Principal - I'm 39 and I roll 3x per week and I lift for 1 hour/1x/week. I do 2 warm up sets, then 3 sets of 5 reps. I do 1 exercise for each major muscle group. I too believe, in addition to smart rolling, that the 1 hour a week of strength training helps reduce injuries and keeps me on the mat. Phone Post 3.0
Only one hour a week, that's it? Do you make any advancements or try to keep the same level week after week? Phone Post 3.0

NicolasRGC - Can anybody point me to injury prevention weightlifting programs? Almost all programs I find are geared towards powerlifters i.e. increasing strength by adding weight to the big compound lifts. Stronglifts, 3x5, starting strength, 5/3/1 etc. I'll be 38 soon and while I still feel okay doing compound lifts, I don't wanna mess up my body. BJJ is still more important to me than lifting. Right now I'm doing 5/3/1 and I feel good, except for the fact that I'm stiff as hell for two days after squat day :)


If you can afford it, I'm a big believer in individual programming.  That is to say, find someone who's qualified and you trust and have them design a program specifically for you.



Aside from that, my general advice is think of continuous improvement by making the smallest possible increase when you increase weight.  I would not add 10 pounds on the bar if I can add 5.  I wouldn't add 5 if I can just add 1.  In my mind, lifting for BJJ means doing the bare minimum to get the benefits of lifting (strength, injury prevention, etc...) and then get out -- spend time recovering.  The Principle has the right train of thought on this...if your BJJ volume is relatively high, drop the lifting volume so that you can recover for the next time you are on the mat.



But take everything I just wrote with a grain of salt.  We're all unique snowflakes to some degree.

May I ask what your numbers are in relation to your weight / height? Not to make a contest out of it, just curious as to what could be considered "strong enough" for BJJ. Phone Post 3.0

OP, what's the gist of the study on plantar fasciitis and lifting? I feel it coming on and it's not fun. Phone Post 3.0

I'm late to the party, but I wanted to add:

Get your movement patterns healthy before you start piling tons of weight on.

 

There's nothing like a good left-right imbalance or a funky unaddressed limitation to really get you injured when you start training hard.  I'm a fan of the Functional Movement Screen but there are other tools of assessment too.  

A lot of the hardstyle kettlebell community got into FMS (largely at Pavel's urging, as he considers himself a student of Gray Cook).  Even though now there's been a split in the RKC org, many of the folks from that community are still great resources for assessment and movement pattern correction.  

I'll add that Dr. Mark Cheng in LA fixed my squat pattern when it was giving me intense pain post-kickboxing a few years back, and his advice is always solid gold.  He's also a lifetime martial artist and BJJ blue belt, so he "gets it".  If you can get his hands on you, it's well worth it.  

 

In Phone Post 3.0