Ever Install Coaxial Speaker Wire?

if anyone can answer this in the next hour or so, i'll buy/ renew them a blue name or donate $30 to their non-profit of choice.

each can (in-ceiling speaker) has two positive and two negative inputs. i'm installing for onto a tapped circuit. do i need two separate loops (1 positive and 1 negative per wire run) or do I use one loop and separate out the positive & negative taps each time?

hope that makes sense. i'll post a couple photos in a minute. Phone Post

*installing FOUR not for Phone Post

Give me a bit. My uncle works on stuff like that for a big company in vegas and has for years with that shit all over. Will get info for you. Phone Post 3.0

I'm no pro but I your talking about bi-wiring speakers, I wouldn't bother. Twice the cable for a slight (debatable) sound improvement you may or may not notice. I guess if your an audiophile or have really high end gear go for it. Phone Post 3.0

Just make little connectors from off cut cable an link the two and - Phone Post 3.0

BangersandSmash - Just make little connectors from off cut cable an link the two and - Phone Post 3.0

thanks for all the input, bros.

so, if i understand this, just jump the two positives and the two negatives on the cans. then strip and split out the shielded positive and negative sides of the wire run and just tape them off after looping them into the correct +/- wires for each? Phone Post

Peeixes - 
BangersandSmash - Just make little connectors from off cut cable an link the two and - Phone Post 3.0

thanks for all the input, bros.

so, if i understand this, just jump the two positives and the two negatives on the cans. then strip and split out the shielded positive and negative sides of the wire run and just tape them off after looping them into the correct +/- wires for each? Phone Post



This.  It would be an absolute waste to run 2 sets of speaker cables.  The signal out of the amplifier is high voltage which doesn't degrade near as much as a low voltage signal (amplifier input).  It will also depend on the length of the run and the gauge of the speaker wire.  

sweet

bangers, you want a blue name or do you want to pay it forward? Phone Post

"Obviously this is for a 70volt system? If he is talking taps? All that is needed for that is one home run from amp (70v) to positive and negative at thespeaker "in" then speaker out to the next speaker etc... " Phone Post 3.0

Peeixes - sweet

bangers, you want a blue name or do you want to pay it forward? Phone Post

He wants to give it to mee!! Phone Post

8ohm or 70volt system? Phone Post 3.0

KJ! -
bobby14 -
Peeixes - sweet

bangers, you want a blue name or do you want to pay it forward? Phone Post

He wants to give it to mee!! Phone Post

Bitch go twerk and you may just get yourself one.

:P Phone Post 3.0

My laptop is effing broke. I might try making a few videos and emailing them to Isis. Forcing her to make them into gifs Phone Post

70v Phone Post

Sounds like you have 14/4 or 16/4 CL3 speaker wire which is a shielded wire for inside walls. If you were running an active crossover with high and low amps, this wire can make that possible. Otherwise, you can tie the 2 positive and 2 negative together. According to the experts, it is more efficient than one fatter wire since the sound frequencies travel on the outer surface only.

Do your cans have passive crossovers inside?

  • and - from the amp to the first speaker only using one of the two pairs of inputs on the speaker. Those two inputs on the speaker are wired together in parallel internally in the speaker. You can run another wire from the second input on the first speaker to one of the inputs on the second speaker and so on and so on. Its just set up like that to make daisy chaining all the speakers together easier. Phone Post

There are a lot of unqualified statements being made on this thread.

IDXtreme - Do your cans have passive crossovers inside?

Atlas Sound FAP62T

pretty sure they're passive crossover Phone Post

FranticlyFapping & RyanVonDoom are correct; everyone else, not so much. The extra set of poles are for daisy chaining, not bi-amping.

The tap selection switches on front essentially allow you to manage the relative volumes of each unit, presuming you are using a 70V amp to drive them. If you are using a regular amp, not a 70V one, you switch them to 8 ohm mode, being careful not to wire more units in parallel than the amp can handle (usually two, sometimes four.)

FWIW, bi-amping is about power efficiency, not fidelity.

It's my uncle's words, not mine. Phone Post 3.0