Ever learn a 2nd language later in life?

Late 30s here, and would like to learn a second language.  Hated learning languages in school and my grades speak for themselves.  But as I have gotten older I really regret not concentrating more.

My chick speaks Cantonese as a second language, so that is what I am aiming for (I know this isn't going to be easy).  Also, where I live in Canada, Cantonese seems to be taking over French!

Obviously trying to get the Mrs to talk to me in Cantonese, but if you have learned a second language, what resources did you use?  Were there any good apps etc?

 

I learned Jive recently.

I told my wife I speak Cantonese, too. She doesn't know the difference.

I've started with several and always lose the routine. A very cool thing to use is duolingo , it's an app you can have on your phone and it will even remind you to practice. Check it out.

Silenus -
UltimateKeyboardWarrior -


I learned Jive recently.

The heck is that ?

Lol jive ass turkey

I remember a nun I think, speaking Jive on one of the Airplane movies.

Started learning Spanish a couple years ago. I haven't practiced much in the last year or so since I don't work down there anymore. I can get by enough to date girls who speak no English. I'm 37.

WhereIsGoranReljic -

I've started with several and always lose the routine. A very cool thing to use is duolingo , it's an app you can have on your phone and it will even remind you to practice. Check it out.

This is basically most people with everything.

"I have an interest, I'm going to start... 2 months later... yea :("

After forgetting my 3 years of high school Spanish I brushed up on it with the pimsleur CD audio lessons. After a couple months I was ready to work all over South America.  

I'm learning spanish. I'm level B2 now which is "upper intermediate".

 

My advice would be the following:

-If you want to be conversational that's about C1 level (lower advanced), that's about 1000 hours of solid study. I learn very quickly normally so I thought I could do it in maybe 200. Wrong. There's just so fucking much to learn.

-Start talking. I'm doing lessons on italki.com (skype one-on-one lessons). They're amazing. And relatively cheap.

-Start reading. People with the best vocab in any language are readers. Write down all the words and translations you don't know.

 

I'm currently doing 15 hours a week - 6 hours lessons 9 hours reading.

45. still try to learn for speak english

is my forst laguage

I speak 3 1/2.

It is doable, where there is a will there is a way.

You HAVE to have motivation and goals. If not you will lose focus and probably quit. Have a trip planned to utilize your skills so you have extra motivation. Really embrace the culture.

Duolingo won't cut it. You need to take actual real courses. FSI, Assimil are good but I don't know if they are in Cantonese. I don't know shit about Cantonese.

Pimsleur, Michele Thomas and Fluenz are all recommend by me highly.

If you drive you should have a learning CD or MP3 going the whole time you are in a car.

Italki is the best, language lessons with professional teachers and informal tutors that are cheaper.

I've learned from school, girlfriends, job training, traveling, and all methods mentioned above.

Watching TV and listening to the radio in the target language is good but didn't help me until I was more advanced.

YouTube is awesome. All kinds of good vids and reading the YouTube comments in a different language is one of my favorite things. It is a fascinating look into other countries and cultures and helps you learn how people really speak and write to each other more informally.

It is amazing how over time it is all just foreign predator language and every month things just start making more and more sense and then one day you read something in a foreign language and it was if you just read it in English and you didn't even have to translate in your head.

Pretty damn awesome.

Also, practice EVERY DAMN DAY if possible. Even 15 or 30 mins if that is all the time you have. You would be amazed how much faster you progress if you keep the ball rolling.

It really gets trippy when you start thinking in your target language randomly when having thoughts in your head.

One of my favorite language quotes:

"If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his language, that goes to his heart."

-Nelson Mandela

Right now I'm working on my third language (Spanish), but I'm also losing my second language (French) because I use it so infrequently.

ryans -


I'm learning spanish. I'm level B2 now which is "upper intermediate".



 



My advice would be the following:



-If you want to be conversational that's about C1 level (lower advanced), that's about 1000 hours of solid study. I learn very quickly normally so I thought I could do it in maybe 200. Wrong. There's just so fucking much to learn.



-Start talking. I'm doing lessons on italki.com (skype one-on-one lessons). They're amazing. And relatively cheap.



-Start reading. People with the best vocab in any language are readers. Write down all the words and translations you don't know.



 



I'm currently doing 15 hours a week - 6 hours lessons 9 hours reading.

Why would anyone listen to you when you claim to know how long it takes to learn a language but you study less than 20 hours a week. I mean common. LoL. Egos these days...

Been learning Spanish for a couple of years. Been fun, tough to. It's mentally tiring.

MacReady - 
Silenus -
UltimateKeyboardWarrior -


I learned Jive recently.

The heck is that ?

Lol jive ass turkey

Chump don't want no help
Chump don't get no help

emu67 - 

Been learning Spanish for a couple of years. Been fun, tough to. It's mentally tiring.


It's good for you. Think of it as mental exercise for your brain.


'What happens in the brain when you learn a language?'

Learning a foreign language can increase the size of your brain. This is what Swedish scientists discovered when they used brain scans to monitor what happens when someone learns a second language. The study is part of a growing body of research using brain imaging technologies to better understand the cognitive benefits of language learning.

This recent brain-based research provides good news. We know that people who speak more than one language fluently have better memories and are more cognitively creative and mentally flexible than monolinguals.

Canadian studies suggest that Alzheimer's disease and the onset of dementia are diagnosed later for bilinguals than for monolinguals, meaning that knowing a second language can help us to stay cognitively healthy well into our later years.

Even more encouraging is that bilingual benefits still hold for those of us who do not learn our second languages as children.

https://www.theguardian.com/education/2014/sep/04/what-happens-to-the-brain-language-learning

MarsMan - FWIW, I started learning English only when I already was a teenager.

That isn't worth shit, really. No offense my man! Lol. It should be easier in your teens.

BTW I think your (written) English is absolutely fantastic for not being a native and I would have a hard time distinguishing you from a native. Right down to slang and abbreviations etc. Most people don't get to that level for a different language.

I would say learning in your 30's should still not be a problem. I can't speak on your 40's and 50's but I would imagine it gets harder then as your mind deteriorates along with your body.

That is why it is important to not only do physical exercise but mental as well.