explosiveness on ground

Hi folks

Anyone got any tips to increase explosiveness on the ground.

I'm getting caught in side mount/scarf hold waaaaaaaay too much.

Mark

 Explosiveness is most likely not your issue.  Hard to give advice without more specifics, but working on your guard retention, framing, anticipation, and timing are more likely to help you than your ability to expode out of established positions.

JRockwell

What is framing?

Anticipation & timing? I agree. I notice I've been recognizing the opportunities to move when I feel my opponent's weight is shifting a split second after he moves.

Other than rolling alot, any idea how to improve that?

I'd say keep rolling from that position to develop the timing first and foremost. Then work on maybe rolling to your knees for a double if you keep getting caught in scarfholds

Agree with jrockwell...It's likely not explosiveness issue. It's probably a timing issue, but not timing of what you think. Beginners tend to wait too long before realizing that their guard has been passed. You prob need to create your framing sooner and you won't get caught in scarf holds.

To me, getting caught in a scarf hold is a flag that you still have your arms extended trying to stop him from passing your guard. So he ends up getting his hip/leg under your arm. Get your elbows in sooner. Then you'll end up in that position less often to begin with.

Anyways, if your elbows are near you, you'll generally be more explosive.

with respect to timing the escape...same as jrockwell.

panic686 - I'd say keep rolling from that position to develop the timing first and foremost. Then work on maybe rolling to your knees for a double if you keep getting caught in scarfholds


I am able to do that with some people.

once guy though, rides high on my chest. any suggestions as to how to dislodge him?

you don't need to create a lot of space to re-guard or scramble ...a few good pieces of advice I learned early in my jiu-jitsu training :

1. If you fight hard to escape side control, it's too late..fight harder to not get passed (recognize when it's time to move)

2. You don't need to forcefully remove your opponent off of you in side control, you only need to create enough space to get away from your opponent (not sure if that makes sense or not typed out) Phone Post

juszczec - 
panic686 - I'd say keep rolling from that position to develop the timing first and foremost. Then work on maybe rolling to your knees for a double if you keep getting caught in scarfholds


I am able to do that with some people.

once guy though, rides high on my chest. any suggestions as to how to dislodge him?


depends if it's modified scarf hold or not (if he has the underhook on the far arm). traditional scarf - you can hug and roll him over you. Modified scarf - you can frame his head away from you and work your legs around to sit up...or put your leg in front of his face and work toward an arm bar as you bring your bottom knee in.

But if you are just beginning, I think you should really work on getting to a good frame sooner, so you don't get caught in a scarf hold. You'll end up in more basic side control positions where you can learn bridging and shrimping to recover guard.

juszczec - 
panic686 - I'd say keep rolling from that position to develop the timing first and foremost. Then work on maybe rolling to your knees for a double if you keep getting caught in scarfholds


I am able to do that with some people.

once guy though, rides high on my chest. any suggestions as to how to dislodge him?



I use a sharp forearm to the throat while framing followed by a split second delay to an oompa to create space.

as others have said, the main key in escaping is really your timing and space. Your opponent's objective is to limit your mobility and take away your space. Your objective is to create space.


Btw, framing is using your arms appropriately to help create space. I hate typing detailed instructions lol. So much better in person

to roll people over you from the scarf hold you must have a good bridge and put your leg and almost hips under the guy after the first bump where you try to throw him on his head. Usually it is less effort to pull back the inside elbow before the position is consolidated and try to go to his back. Side control is mostly shrimp and get back to the guard, use your arms to push but not expose them, if you need space push his chest, head, turn, bridge, whatever explode.

One exercise to do is practice only the escapes like a drill. You can get a heavy partner, someone that is good on judo holdowns, or get one guy to do the top hold e another for the legs. This way you will have to use every muscle and every inch to escape.

all - panic686 gave the definition of framing. i do it, just didn't know the name.


ohmy23 - i don't think the guy is going to scarf hold from side mount. he seems to end up in scarf hold. i'll have to watch that the next time we roll.

mrgoodarmbar - no modified scarf hold. now that I think about it, i should be turning to my side sooner, before he has his weight on my chest in scarf hold. one of the reasons i'm having difficulty is the way I learned to get out of scarf hold. Turn into them, get your knees underneath you and brace yourself against them as you come up. I've got arthritis in my neck and scar tissue in my lower back. so i'm really gun shy about that motion.

panic686 - I'll try the forearm.



 deadlift son

My bad I thought you were asking about tips to escape common side control.... Phone Post

Barbatha - due to a back injury, no deadlifting

Reposition back to the guard

TheRealMKL - the question is how, when the guy has a tight scarf hold and is resting his weight on my chest?

Some fine advice above...

But in terms of being more explosive with your escapes, STOMP your feet on the ground whenever you bridge to escape any bottom position. I use the term "stomp-buck" to describe it because that's what it is; you stomp your feet and immediately bridge/buck. (I like the term "buck" because it conveys explosiveness, which is generally whats needed to get someone off of you).

Once you are doing the above well and comfortably, you can add doing the OPPOSITE of a stomp-buck (a "crunch" motion) right before the escape in order to help create space and give you more room to build up momentum when you do the actual stomp-buck. It also has the added benefit of giving you some of your opponent's energy to play with; when you do a crunch, they will tend to push your upper-body back down --which is what you want. It's the old action-reaction thing.

I find this usually adds greatly to one's explosiveness.

oompa. lol Phone Post

Great advice from Shen. For some visual help, check out the video below. At 2:20, Marcelo swims his left arm under his opponent's far armpit. This is probably the time when your friend is switching to a scarf hold on you. As soon as he reaches for your head with his right arm, that's when you need to be bridging or "stomp-bucking", etc., depending on the particular escape you're looking for.