Football Talk: Route-running.

A crisp route does two important things, imo. The sudden direction change that the DB has to react to gives you a split second of being open and your 40 time is way less important than your "suddenness" or whatever you wanna call it, as far as route running goes. Two, a proper route builds trust with your QB. If you and he know a specific route will lead to a brief instant of the WR being open and he trusts you to run it cleanly, he can throw to that spot where you'll be open before you even make your break. 

Played a lot of football and there's one thing that really stood out to me when it comes to good receivers and their routes. That is reading the safeties and cornerbacks. I'll explain.

 

The best receivers always ran their route based on the coverage. Tight coverage called for somewhat of a shortcut on the route, i.e. a short out would somewhat morph into a shallow slant, to beat the coverage. Or, when doing a mid-range out, running straight upfield until you see the CB make one step forward, then making your cut. Or doing a manure step in place of your out and up to trick the CB into thinking you're doing a hook. There was always a level of improvisation based on who was covering you. No good receiver ever ran against the same CB exactly the same way, every play. It was chess. You had to make them step where they weren't supposed to, to give you that angle or half step separation. There is feints and footwork and ALL the training, but the best WRs were beating the CB's mind before beating them on the field. I was never the fastest on the field, so I had to use more tactics to beat faster players.

willis007 -

Played a lot of football and there's one thing that really stood out to me when it comes to good receivers and their routes. That is reading the safeties and cornerbacks. I'll explain.


 


The best receivers always ran their route based on the coverage. Tight coverage called for somewhat of a shortcut on the route, i.e. a short out would somewhat morph into a shallow slant, to beat the coverage. Or, when doing a mid-range out, running straight upfield until you see the CB make one step forward, then making your cut. Or doing a manure step in place of your out and up to trick the CB into thinking you're doing a hook. There was always a level of improvisation based on who was covering you. No good receiver ever ran against the same CB exactly the same way, every play. It was chess. You had to make them step where they weren't supposed to, to give you that angle or half step separation. There is feints and footwork and ALL the training, but the best WRs were beating the CB's mind before beating them on the field. I was never the fastest on the field, so I had to use more tactics to beat faster players.

Good post.

Quick question, I was watching highlights of Jaylen Waddle, the WR from 'Bama just drafted by the Dolphins in the first round. On one of the plays, he gets a release to the outside and blows by the defender, several steps ahead, only to cut to the inside (I remember seeing the same thing in the Jerry Rice highlights that were previously linked in this thread). My question is, why go past the Corner on the outside only to cut back in? Wouldn’t you risk running into the corner? I’m not talking about faking in one direction when the corner is still in front/right next to the receiver, but the receiver had already blown by the corner to the side opposite of his route.