Garden Tips?

Wife and I decided to plant our first garden a couple weeks ago. We started pretty basic/small since it is the first time doing one

Planted -
Hot Peppers
Bell peppers
2 types of onions
Lettuce
Tomatoes

The onions and lettuce are doing good. So far. The rest look like garbage and seem to be dying or just not growing at all.

What kind of tricks/etc can I use to help grow a good garden? Phone Post

Do a soil test to see what nutrients you are missing. Also check the Ph levels and see what the types of things you are growing like. Some veggies like acidic soil while others do not. Good luck, I started gardening this year as well and have come to realize growing shitis not as easy as putting seeds in the ground.

Lagging can also be fixed by sprinking fertilizer pellets around each plant. Better if you put it in when turning over the soil right before planting (as well as planting each plant over a handful of composted cow manure). A bag of 10-10-10 isn't that pricy and easily found at Home Despot. Phone Post

Mayhem13 - Wife and I decided to plant our first garden a couple weeks ago. We started pretty basic/small since it is the first time doing one

Planted -
Hot Peppers
Bell peppers
2 types of onions
Lettuce
Tomatoes

The onions and lettuce are doing good. So far. The rest look like garbage and seem to be dying or just not growing at all.

What kind of tricks/etc can I use to help grow a good garden? Phone Post
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frederic - 

Lagging can also be fixed by sprinking fertilizer pellets around each plant. Better if you put it in when turning over the soil right before planting (as well as planting each plant over a handful of composted cow manure). A bag of 10-10-10 isn't that pricy and easily found at Home Despot. Phone Post


Yup, you can also get liquid fertilizer that you can spray on the plants and also use to soak the ground around the plant. I just got some 10-10-10 for my garden to try out. Oh and the 10-10-10 numbers refer to the perctentage of the nutrients. A bag of 10-10-10 fertilizer contains 10 percent nitrogen, 10 percent phosphate and 10 percent potash.

Tomatoes need a lot of sun.

For watering, don't water the leaves water the bed.  Don't water the bed everyday.  Completely soak it and repeat when it starts to get dry.  For me i go about a week between watering.

In my experience, it is much easier to grow tomatoes from started plants than from seeds.  I've tried seeds twice and failed both times.  This years I have 3 tomato plants I've planted in the same bed.  One looks amazing, one is on the fence, and one is dying a painful death.  Not sure why.

Without knowing more about your situation, it is hard to diagnose. However, I will definitely agree a soil test is in order: UMASS has great soil testing services:

http://soiltest.umass.edu/services

In general, some good fertilizer will probably help you back on track. I use stuff called "Earth Juice", which is a pretty expensive line, but eveything is organic and salts won't build up in your soil, and I get great results from all my plants with it. If you are just looking for a short term solution, there are plenty of much cheaper options which will also work very well. If you have the time/energy, I recommend doing an aerated compost tea (google it), which will help establish a good soil ecology.

Also, if you have some wood laying around and feel like a little extra work, I recommend hugelkultures (again, google it): they take a little while to set up, and you may still have to fertilize for the first year, but then your garden will get fertilized from below for years to come, and the plants will love you for it.

Another thing I recommend is spraying the leaves with worm compost tea. There is stuff called "Nature's Big Bud" which I just put in a spray bottle and spray the leaves every week or so. Bugs hate it, plants love it.

Also, I highly recommend adding a layer of wood mulch to the top of your garden soil - it will protect against dehydration, buffer the temperature of the soil, and will slowly break down and make more topsoil, constantly adding mutrients (do not bury the mulch into the soil, or the resulting decomposition could rob your soil of Nitrogen).

Anyway, that's my 2 cents.

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Burt Reynoldz -

Tomatoes need a lot of sun.

For watering, don't water the leaves water the bed.  Don't water the bed everyday.  Completely soak it and repeat when it starts to get dry.  For me i go about a week between watering.

In my experience, it is much easier to grow tomatoes from started plants than from seeds.  I've tried seeds twice and failed both times.  This years I have 3 tomato plants I've planted in the same bed.  One looks amazing, one is on the fence, and one is dying a painful death.  Not sure why.

Tomato seeds need to be started in January or February indoors to make them equivalent to what you can buy in a 6 pack flat. Phone Post

Thanks for all the info. I will look into this stuff asap

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frederic - 
Burt Reynoldz -

Tomatoes need a lot of sun.

For watering, don't water the leaves water the bed.  Don't water the bed everyday.  Completely soak it and repeat when it starts to get dry.  For me i go about a week between watering.

In my experience, it is much easier to grow tomatoes from started plants than from seeds.  I've tried seeds twice and failed both times.  This years I have 3 tomato plants I've planted in the same bed.  One looks amazing, one is on the fence, and one is dying a painful death.  Not sure why.

Tomato seeds need to be started in January or February indoors to make them equivalent to what you can buy in a 6 pack flat. Phone Post



Ahhh.  That makes sense.  Do you have any other tips for growing bood tomatoes?

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