Go to knees against modif. scarf

I need a good way to get to my knees when I'm under the modified scarf hold.

I've seen at least 2 ways (in both cases you should drop your near elbow to the ground to posture against the modified scarf hold):

1. Get on your near elbow and then get to your knees.

2. Use your far hand (the one that would usually be under his throat) to push his far bicep away and then suddenly stop pushing his bicep, duck your head under his far arm, turn your upper body face down and then get to your knees.

For some reason, the second method sounds better to me. I've seen a clip of Roy Harris do something similar (it's somewhere on www.royharris.com), although I'm not sure if I have all the details down. But what should I do to avoid my back being taken when I do this move?

Also, if you can mention other good escapes from this hold down, that would be nice. I already have Bolo's pin escape tapes, but in those, he shows only the FIRST method (number 1 above).

Someone discuss, please?

Regards,

jonpall.

I personally hate to stay under someone like you're saying you end up being in after that move. The basic two options are to try to pull guard immediately, or to immediately grab for the single leg to pull them over. I usually do the first. I did run into a pretty nice manuver though when I was rolling with a friend of mine last year. Every time I would get into a front head lock situation, I would try to circle around, but all he did was do a sommersault and put me in his guard. He did that same type of escape from sidemount or scarfhold or whatever, and then immediately do a sommersault as I tried to turn the corner so he had me back in guard, so I could never take his back. It works pretty well.

As for other escapes there's always the trusty push your forearm into his neck and then rock back and throw your far leg over his head and try to pull him off you. That's usually the first one I try. Even if it doesn't work, you can then use their distraction to then turn it around into the above mentioned escapes. Escaping a bad position, especially a tight one like modified scarfhold is all about misdirection. Try to esecape in one direction, then switch it up on them. An opposite directional escape creates the space you need to actually escape on your follow up escape in the other direction.

I am not an expert, so don't take my word for gold, but i think i learnt another escape, or a slight variation to what you are suggesting.

if he is on your right side, take your left forarm and put some pressure on his jaw throat, while doing this scoot your hips to the left. Now, he is not leaning against your body and if you sit up he should fall backwards to an exact reverse of the position.

Hope at least their is an idea in this that you can work with.

ttt

Getting to your knees when the top guy has an underhook is hard.

I usually like to just get my near elbow down and put my forearm against his neck and start doing the elbow knee escape to guard. At this point he will be very uncomfortable, and will switch to some other position, and hopefully you can escape in the transition.

If he doesn't switch, then once you get on your side, it is much easier to get the underhook, and then go to your knees.

Andrew Yao is most correct. I just wish I could do likewise.

Thanx Sam

FreestyleJJ: Yeah, throwing your leg over his face is good to know, for the reasons you mentioned.

"Getting to your knees when the top guy has an underhook is hard. "

Well, the better your posture is and the more you are on your side, the easier it is, especially if you can avoid his far arm, which will be trying to cross face you or pull on your near arm.

"I usually like to just get my near elbow down and put my forearm against his neck and start doing the elbow knee escape to guard. At this point he will be very uncomfortable, and will switch to some other position, and hopefully you can escape in the transition. "

:) Yeah, this is really what I do, too. I would just like to know more ways to get out from there than just assuming posture, waiting and thinking of England while I hope my opponent gets more uncomfortable than I am.

"If he doesn't switch, then once you get on your side, it is much easier to get the underhook, and then go to your knees. "

Ok, I didn't really think of doing that. Now that I think about it, it sounds ok to me to pummel myself into the NORMAL scarf hold (all the time with my near elbow on the mat), staying on my side, raising my elbow, scooting down, getting to my knees and either taking the back with a duckunder or ending up in front of him with the underhook.

But no one has yet recommened my escape nr. 2 in my first post, i.e. putting my far palm in his far bicep and ducking under his far arm to get to my knees. You guys don't like that one? Well, perhaps I should stick to practising Bolo's way of getting to my knees against the modified scarf hold (my escape nr. 1 in my first post)...

jonpall.

ttt

JP, I'm having trouble picturing the #2 escape you're talking about. If you walk me through it (i.e. my right arm on his right bicep, etc.) I might be able to venture an opinion.

In the meantime, here is an escape that I use a lot from there. It's a little hard to describe, but I got it from Matt Thornton, if that gives it any more validity. ;) Let's say my opponent has me in modified scarf, underhooking my left arm. I get my right elbow to the floor, as usual. Now I want to bridge a little bit and bump him forward with my hips. As I do this, I scoot myself down underneath him, so now his ribs are actually resting on my right elbow. While his weight is momentarily braced by my elbow, I scoot out the back door, turning to my left as I direct his weight over my head. His body goes above my head and I turn to my knees in the direction of his head (left). My right hand reaches over and grabs his chin like a handle as I come on top of him and finish in a dominant front headlock position.

I got that at a seminar a few years ago, but I think it's on the SBG Escapes from Bottom DVD as well. It feels a little awkward at first, but when you use it in combination with escapes that shove his weight backwards, it's actually pretty high percentage.

Best,

Jeff

jrockwell, that is a nice move. I actually use it a lot when it is there. Never got shown it as a technique, but spinning out the backdoor is pretty high percentage for me too. The way I do it, I usually just spin 360 all the way back to my guard.

"JP, I'm having trouble picturing the #2 escape you're talking about. If you walk me through it (i.e. my right arm on his right bicep, etc.) I might be able to venture an opinion. "

He's on my right side. I use my left hand to push his left bicep away and then I duck my head under his left arm and turn my upper body face down. I then get to my knees.