"Gone With The Wind" Misquote?

 

Almost everyone knows about the famous line from Gone With The Wind, when Clark Gable says to Vivien Leigh, "Frankly My Dear, I don't give a damn".

But is that actually correct? Shouldn't it be "I don't give a dam"? The whole "I don't give a dam" phrase came from the Indian coin called a "Dam". So by saying something wasn't worth a "Dam" you were literally saying something wasn't worth the inexpensive indian coin.

I don't know if "I don't give a damn" even makes sense. There isn't a definition that properly fits the quote.

 

It might sound like a silly thing to debate. But me and my employee were talking about phrases that people fuck up all the time. I mentioned this and we debated it for a bit till I showed her there was a real thing called a "Dam".  She then brought up the Gone With The Wind quote.

Thoughts?

Frankly op, I don't give a damn. Phone Post 3.0

^beat me to it Phone Post 3.0

Look at all the dams I don't give. . . Phone Post 3.0

Phone Post 3.0

You realize this was a book right? you could just skim the book for the quote. Phone Post 3.0

shampoohorn - You realize this was a book right? you could just skim the book for the quote. Phone Post 3.0


Yes but I never read it and wasn't privy to whether or not that was a line added to the movie or if it was from the book.

Frankly my dear, I done give a Van Damme. Phone Post 3.0

David@accu -
shampoohorn - You realize this was a book right? you could just skim the book for the quote. Phone Post 3.0


Yes but I never read it and wasn't privy to whether or not that was a line added to the movie or if it was from the book.

Wikipedia:
"Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn" is a line from the 1939 film Gone with the Wind starring Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh. The line is spoken by Rhett Butler (Gable), as his last words to Scarlett O'Hara (Leigh), in response to her tearful question: "Where shall I go? What shall I do?" Scarlett, however, clings to the hope that she can win him back. This line is partially spoken by Rhett Butler in Margaret Mitchell's novel Gone with the Wind, published in 1936, from which the movie is derived. The novel does not include the word "frankly" which was added by scriptwriter Sidney Howard. Phone Post 3.0

"Damn" goes all the way back to middle English.

So, your Indian coin theory is not likely.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/damn?s=t

 

If GWTW was remade today, he'd be saying, "Frankly, bitch, I don't give a mad fuck."

 

People in India are poor as fuck so they didn't have enough room on their coins for the "n". We do so we added the extra letter just to rub their faces in it.

Might be time to get out of the house for a while OP. Go meet a girl or something. Phone Post 3.0

Where can I get some dam bait ? Phone Post 3.0

Its a common phrase in England Phone Post 3.0