Guillard: Reebook 'a slap in the face' to veterans

                    <div class="Article" style="float: left;">
                        <table>
                        <tr style="vertical-align: bottom;">
                        <td>
                            <h3><a href="/go=news.detail&gid=453866" target="_blank">
                                Guillard: Reebook 'a slap in the face' to veterans

                            </a></h3>
                        </td>
                        </tr>
                        </table>
                        <a href="/go=news.detail&gid=453866" ><img class="photo" src="http://img.mixedmartialarts.com/method=get&rs=50&q=75&x=31&y=9&w=310&h=165&ro=0&s=melvin-guillard-05-04-2015-11-31-1-715.png" /></a>



                        <div style="clear: both; line-height: 1px;height: 1px;">&nbsp;</div>
                    </div>

                    <p>Melvin Guillard spent most of his career inside the UFC Octagon and after a quick stint with WSOF, now finds himself fighting for Bellator MMA.</p>

Guillard recently spoke to MMA Fighting about his transition into Bellator MMA and also about the UFC's new deal with Reebok, which he believes is a complete 'slap in the face' to long-time veterans:

If Guillard was fighting in the UFC on Friday night, he would earn $20,000 from Reebok for his extensive Octagon experience. That number is eight times larger than the $2,500 starting figure which is handed out to UFC newbies, but is one that Guillard says still pales in comparison to the $50,000 or $60,000 per fight he claims was commonplace for him around 2008-2009, before the UFC instituted its sponsor tax.

With those numbers in mind, Guillard likened the new Reebok figures to "a slap in the face" for his veteran teammates.

"Guys aren't happy with how things are going as far as the Reebok deal, obviously," Guillard said. "Guys are losing money with sponsorships because they can't make any money with sponsors. I never ever understood when I was with the UFC and they started charging companies to be in the UFC. That's when everything started affecting our money. I never understood that, but I was always optimistic to think that maybe they would pay us more money on the back-end because we were losing money on this end, but it never happened. So I don't know what the motive for what they're doing is.

"If I was still in the UFC, I know I wouldn't be paying my agent no 15- or 20-percent for marketing because there's no point now," Guillard added. "You might as well just pay them for lining up your fight."

read entire article...

                    <div style="clear: left; line-height: 1px;height: 1px;">&nbsp;</div>

Read abook is a slap Phone Post 3.0

"But they look professional"
-Dana Phone Post 3.0

Cocaine. It'll make you smack yo own face. Phone Post 3.0

Buy Giblert Reebook shirt at the 1$ store now! Phone Post 3.0

The Reebok is a shitty deal as it stands, but comparing the sponsorship numbers against the 2008-era figures is more than a little misleading.

No one can question how great the market was back then, but from what most fighters have said, by 2010 the market started drying up for the good money sponsors. Obviously for the bigger names and some luckier fighters, the market was still pretty strong; but for most of the guys, those days were in the past.

Not saying that the Reebok deal is good (it isn't) I just think that Melvin is a little misguided about what he would be getting these days in a open market UFC compared to what Reebok would be paying him. Phone Post 3.0

Didn't take long for someone to bring up his prior drug use... wtf does it have to do with what he said? Phone Post 3.0

Fighters need to realize the importance of social media. You can sell your personal shirts as well as promote your sponsors. If you have 100k followers with say 5000 to 10000 who will buy your shirt or items you promote, you can make some good money. This cash flow will last even when not scheduled to fight. Phone Post 3.0

BLACKBUDDAH - Fighters need to realize the importance of social media. You can sell your personal shirts as well as promote your sponsors. If you have 100k followers with say 5000 to 10000 who will buy your shirt or items you promote, you can make some good money. This cash flow will last even when not scheduled to fight. Phone Post 3.0
If a random UFC fighter can generate a 10% click-through rate on ANY social media platform he should immediately leave the fight business and go make millions selling soap and baby diapers on Madison Ave.

What you're suggesting is simply not realistic. Phone Post 3.0

Guillard is on my tune out list.

He could say 1+1=2, and I would be tempted to argue otherwise just cause I don't want to have the same position on a matter as him.

Not a fan of his at all.

Here's what that turd said in April:

"To be honest, instead of being the World Series of Fighting champion I'd rather be in the UFC just fighting in the top 10 and probably never becoming the UFC world champion, if I had that option. If I had the option to be the World Series champion right now, or go back to the UFC to finish off my career with the UFC, whether I get a title shot or not, I would take that UFC contract over a World Series [contract] any day."