half guard, he turns to face legs

This seems to be happening a lot to me with several different people: I am on the bottom of the half guard, with his right leg trapped. I have my left arm underhooking his right arm. He turns to face my legs, like in the reverse scarf hold, and puts both his arms across my body, so his head and both arms are on the left side of my body. He then reaches his right arm up and grabs my left wrist and goes for a kimura. It's hard to keep my underhooking arm in the underhook because he's turned on his side with his underhooked arm up, and when he reaches up into the air with his underhooked arm, it's hard for my arm to follow it.

I'm pretty good at defending the kimura, but I'm not improving my position at all. This is in no-gi by the way, in the gi it doesn't seem to happen as much. I know the classic response is to elevator sweep him to the right, but since that's the only thing I know to do, people usually are ready to counter it and pass. So, what are some other options? How do I keep the underhook in this position? Will some jackass be unable to resist the urge to say something about "don't get there in the first place"?

ttt

The classic response is, as you point out, to elevator sweep him to your right.  If that isn't working there is a related technique that you might be able to pull off.

Lift him slightly with your hooking (left) foot and then instead of trying to sweep him try to escape your hips out to the right a little bit.  Now let him fall down again and you have essentially taken his back.  Finish by scrambling for the back.

By turning to face your legs and placing his arm on the other side of your head he has removed the crossface which would normally block your ability to take his back.

ttt

Stephan, so I have to lift him enough to get past his left leg? I'll try it.

Yes, you have to lift his right leg enough so that you can sneak under his body and left leg.  You don't have to lift him very high - you are basically unweighting him.

Sometimes you can use your right hand, which isn't doing much anyhow, to lift his weight a bit at the hip or his knee.

Often this 'sweep' results gets countered by him readjusting his weight, arms and position and you end up back in a more conventional half guard.  Oh well, sometimes you get the bear, sometimes the bear gets you.

ONe question.

1. Is it possible to use an overhook instead of an underhook in this situation?

When someone attempts this same thing on me i wrap my hands together and start to shrimp my hips away from him as far as i can. Then with my underhooked foot start raising up while bridging at the sametime. Usually they'll have to reajust leave the arm be and i end up back in guard.

I had this problem a lot as well (only do no-gi), and after asking my instructor he told me i should keep my underhook tighter and deeper. Also if he starts reaching back, to "arch" (not sure how to explain this better) the hand of your underhooked arm towards his shoulder so that it doesn´t slip out when he is reaching back for the kimura. I'm still trying to make this muscle memory so i do it automaticly, but when i remember to do this it´s usually a lot easier to keep the underhook and not let him set the kimura up.

You need to block his hips before they drop. Bring your arms in and make a frame before he drops his weight on you.

Where's Jonpall?

Saulo showed me some way sort of shrimp into a more traditional half/
full guard, but I forgot how. I think I wrote it down, though, so if I can
find my notes, I'll post it. But I have trouble with this too.

Greg

Btw i'm not entirely satisfied how i was explaining the "arch" of the hand. To more graphicly depict what i was trying to convey:

Say you are in halfguard trapping his right leg and have the left underhook. If he starts to lean back to try and grab your wrist (which he´ll have to do with his right arm), you should "arch" your left hand, so that the knuckles and the fingers of your hand are reaching over his shoulder, and your palm should then be facing towards the ceiling and the entire back of your hand staying pressed against the back of his shoulder, which kind of anchors your hand there and makes it very hard for him to reach for and disrupt your underhook.

Don't know if this will help cause i am not exactly sure how it happened but i was wrestling with my instuctor and i had him in the is position. He baited me with the chance of a kimura, i accepted this eargerly and he sifted under me, so i ended up on the other side of his body in an arm triangle. Like i said not exactly sure how it happens by you may want to think along those lines when looking for a solution.

"The classic response is, as you point out, to elevator sweep him to your right."

But doesn't the guy just pass if you unhook your half guard to do an elevator? Any pics of this sweep?

I've had the same problem in the last few months, and asked around. Here's the best answer I found.

Say you're trapping his right leg, so his hips are on your right and his head and left arm are on your left.

First, you can sweep him by driving your knees up into your chest and putting his weight up high. Pull up on his left knee with your right hand, while pushing down on his left elbow with your left hand. You should get a shaolin-esque spinning sweep where you end up on top of him in his half guard.

If this doesn't work, you can switch your hips while your opponent is up in the air and double leg him to his back by grabbing his knees.

You can also underhook his calf with your left instep and use this to elevate him, but make sure you've got your right calf on top of his leg, or he'll just take his leg out and pass by switching his hips. Once he's up in the air, you can take his back and/or sweep him in three directions.

Also, if he's dumb and has his head up, and non-stuck leg too close to your hips, you can cross-face him from behind, reef on his head and bridge him over backwards so you end up on top.

Whew.

"First, you can sweep him by driving your knees up into your chest and putting his weight up high. Pull up on his left knee with your right hand, while pushing down on his left elbow with your left hand."

Wombat, interesting ... you give up your left underhook and use that to grab his left (far) elbow? Did I get that right?

Qeysus,


"Say you are in halfguard trapping his right leg and have the left underhook. If he starts to lean back to try and grab your wrist (which he´ll have to do with his right arm), ..."


if he starts to lean back and reach back with his top arm to grab your left wrist on the hand that in underhooked. i usually find that i can use my right hand to trap his top (reaching hand) with a 1on1 wrist tie - i do this by reaching across his back. since he's leaning back and pulling his top elbow back to seixe your underhooking arm you should be able to see some space created between his bicep and forearm. that little window is where you sneak your right hand in and grab the wrist. its just a nice handle to have to offset his balance and enable sweep, reversals, or taking the back.


does that description make sense?

ohhh nice one, yeah i see what you´re saying, that´s a nice move, i'll definetly try that. I usually just do the hand arch to keep the underhook and not give him the grip so he can kimura me. Rarely able to mount much of an offense from there (except maybe squirm back to guard).

ttt

I like stephan's counter to the problem. If he's pulling his arm up like you said so you can't hang on to it, you might have an opening there to do it. The way I like to do it, is if he pulls up to get rid of your underhook, abandon the under hook, and pull it down to push out from his hips, then quickly shrimp up and replace your hands with your left shin across his stomach and underhook the far leg with your right arm. The shin across the stomach will keep them from readjusting their weight back onto you. Then you can grab under their car shin and get control of the ankle to help you lift and sweep or go out the back door.