Home Owners Insurance

GenericAmerican - If it were me, I would just say I don't have dogs and then if there was ever an inspection, I would have my dogs at someone else's house for a day.

But, I will also warn you that I've handled many dog bite cases. And there is a reason those breeds make insurance companies nervous. And every owner whose dog has just ripped someone's face off says the same thing "I never thought he would do something like that, he's so great with my kids", etc.

I have a friend who has a rural property and someone asked her to take this big old dog they had (I forget the breed, but it didn't look like your typical "scary dog", it was just big). They had the dog a few weeks and some guy came walking down their road. They dog attacked him and nearly killed him. Luckily she had insurance, because that was years ago and the court case is still going. This dog was old, slow and had never shown aggression before.

Also, the average payout for a dog bite is about $30k, which would be on you if you didn't have insurance (not to mention legal fees on top of that. Insurance policies require the insurance company to represent you no matter what happens).


This is bad advice. 



This is called misrepresentation



If there is a claim related to the dog at best the insurance company will drop you and not cover the claim.  Dog bites are the third largest liability claim for loss behind swimming pools and autos.  At worst, the insurance company can sue you for misrepresentation, and collect any difference in premium you would have paid if the dog had been correctly disclosed.



If your house is above a certain monatary threshold, call Chubb, AIG or Fireman's Fund.  Make sure your liability is in line, and take out an excess policy.  They will be willing to look at the risk provided you have a good credit and are relatively claim free.



 



 

Prior military by any chance? If so USAA will write the policy as long as the dog hasn't bitten or attacked anyone. There are only breed restrictions for umbrella policies. Phone Post 3.0

I've owned presa's for the last 18 years

as far as my HOI is concerned they are mastiffs

AlphaSlap - 
GenericAmerican - If it were me, I would just say I don't have dogs and then if there was ever an inspection, I would have my dogs at someone else's house for a day.

But, I will also warn you that I've handled many dog bite cases. And there is a reason those breeds make insurance companies nervous. And every owner whose dog has just ripped someone's face off says the same thing "I never thought he would do something like that, he's so great with my kids", etc.

I have a friend who has a rural property and someone asked her to take this big old dog they had (I forget the breed, but it didn't look like your typical "scary dog", it was just big). They had the dog a few weeks and some guy came walking down their road. They dog attacked him and nearly killed him. Luckily she had insurance, because that was years ago and the court case is still going. This dog was old, slow and had never shown aggression before.

Also, the average payout for a dog bite is about $30k, which would be on you if you didn't have insurance (not to mention legal fees on top of that. Insurance policies require the insurance company to represent you no matter what happens).


This is bad advice. 



This is called misrepresentation



If there is a claim related to the dog at best the insurance company will drop you and not cover the claim.  Dog bites are the third largest liability claim for loss behind swimming pools and autos.  At worst, the insurance company can sue you for misrepresentation, and collect any difference in premium you would have paid if the dog had been correctly disclosed.



If your house is above a certain monatary threshold, call Chubb, AIG or Fireman's Fund.  Make sure your liability is in line, and take out an excess policy.  They will be willing to look at the risk provided you have a good credit and are relatively claim free.



 



 


Did you read my post? Of course it's not a good idea. I had one sentence saying that I would probably just hide the dog, then I had 3 paragraphs explaining why that is not a good idea.

But, in reality, I just wouldn't have the dog.

I handle claims for Chubb, AIG & Fireman's, they are all great companies to have (AIG Private Client Group seems to be the most customer friendly).

GenericAmerican - 
AlphaSlap - 
GenericAmerican - If it were me, I would just say I don't have dogs and then if there was ever an inspection, I would have my dogs at someone else's house for a day.

But, I will also warn you that I've handled many dog bite cases. And there is a reason those breeds make insurance companies nervous. And every owner whose dog has just ripped someone's face off says the same thing "I never thought he would do something like that, he's so great with my kids", etc.

I have a friend who has a rural property and someone asked her to take this big old dog they had (I forget the breed, but it didn't look like your typical "scary dog", it was just big). They had the dog a few weeks and some guy came walking down their road. They dog attacked him and nearly killed him. Luckily she had insurance, because that was years ago and the court case is still going. This dog was old, slow and had never shown aggression before.

Also, the average payout for a dog bite is about $30k, which would be on you if you didn't have insurance (not to mention legal fees on top of that. Insurance policies require the insurance company to represent you no matter what happens).


This is bad advice. 



This is called misrepresentation



If there is a claim related to the dog at best the insurance company will drop you and not cover the claim.  Dog bites are the third largest liability claim for loss behind swimming pools and autos.  At worst, the insurance company can sue you for misrepresentation, and collect any difference in premium you would have paid if the dog had been correctly disclosed.



If your house is above a certain monatary threshold, call Chubb, AIG or Fireman's Fund.  Make sure your liability is in line, and take out an excess policy.  They will be willing to look at the risk provided you have a good credit and are relatively claim free.



 



 


Did you read my post? Of course it's not a good idea. I had one sentence saying that I would probably just hide the dog, then I had 3 paragraphs explaining why that is not a good idea.

But, in reality, I just wouldn't have the dog.

I handle claims for Chubb, AIG & Fireman's, they are all great companies to have (AIG Private Client Group seems to be the most customer friendly).


My bad, I just read a ton of people on this thread telling the OP to misrepresent himself.  Sorry to single you out.



I work for Marsh PCS, the bulk of my clients are on Chubb - but AIG PCG is really good about writing riskier properties (Chubb won't touch the Hamptons)

That's alright.

My company handles claims for almost every insurance company, so it's always interesting to see how each company interprets things (even the same exact policy wording). When we got the AIG PCG account, we were basically told that the only way we could screw up would be to upset the customer. They will throw money at people just to keep them happy. I've always assumed their premiums must match that level of customer care. We've gotten to handle claims for a bunch of celebrity's homes in LA, which is always interesting (although you rarely meet the people, just some rep).

Thanks everyone i found a policy that has a exclusion for dogs. Wellington is insurance name. I hope its a reputable company Phone Post 3.0

Never heard of them, but I'm sure you'll be fine. Hopefully you'll never have a reason to find out if they are a good company or not.