How many CDL Class A drivers are here?

already have my permit, but gonna start class for a cdl a license at the community college in february, I know there is good mney to be made if youre a good truck driver but that would come with at least 6 months OTR experience,was wondering what you guys made per hour when you first started?

First off, just worry about passing the test. Study your pre-trip inspections(air breaks tests, coupling, tire pressure, and the terms for the inspection) because this can get kind of tricky. Try to get as much wheel time as you can. If you think that just because you know how to drive stick ur good... That is not the case. Backing up a trailer is unlike any other animal even if you have driven straight jobs. Get all the endorsements you can (especially hazmat and combinations) because this will broaden the companies you can apply to.

As for getting a job...I can't speak for you but doing over the road sucks to me. They pay you either by the mile or by the load and it is a stressful and lonely existence.

My advice to you is to find a union barn and apply for a switcher position. This way you can get a better feel for driving and backing into loading docks. All your job would be is jockeying trucks around the yard. And being a union shop would mean you would start accruing annuity and pension credits as well as hours worked. Pay rate is different everywhere but problably start at 15/hr. Good luck bro Phone Post 3.0

I hate over-the-road trucking. Maybe it is because I have a family but I wouldn't go back to it. I do local driving and the place I work at starts at $20.25 an hour with occasional overtime. It's a union gig and you work from 5-6 pm to 5-6 am Phone Post 3.0

18 years trucking. I've done OTR, line-haul, local LTL, intermodal containers, doubles-triples, tanker.

OTR sucks, but it's an easy way to get your feet wet. I'd recommend going OTR for 6 months or so in order to get a good handle on driving forward, turning, basic stuff.

Then find a local job and master the finer points of backing. LTL is a good gig, you'll make pick-ups and deliveries all over town, bump about 20 docks a day, Monday thru Friday, and the hourly pay is usually pretty good. If you can pick up some hours as a yard-dog, yard-mule, switcher, whatever you want to call it, you'll become an expert backer real quick.

Once you've made your bones, specialize. Flatbed, over-size loads, fuel-hauler, etc. Specialties are where you make your money.

I'm pulling a pneumatic tanker hauling
frac-sand in the oil-fields now and the money is the best I've ever made.

Good luck, and any questions just ask. Phone Post 3.0

ttt for more input..

Turdkutter - I have a class b with a tanker and hazmat endorsement but am workin on my a's with doubles and triples. Dont worry bout driving it comes to you. The one thing to remember is pretrip pretrip pretrip. I studied my ass off and failed the first time. Phone Post 3.0

thats what I've heard, thanks again..

Long hours Phone Post 3.0

10 years trucking, owner operator.

first year you do it you won't have any idea wtf you are doing for the most part. people aren't usually very eager to help either.

started off making .25/mile. weekly paycheck was 5-700 depending on how many miles I had and what kind of extra pay I could get like driver assisted unloading, extra stops etc. my goal the whole time was to become an oo which I did after year 1. Phone Post 3.0

danggook - 10 years trucking, owner operator.

first year you do it you won't have any idea wtf you are doing for the most part. people aren't usually very eager to help either.

started off making .25/mile. weekly paycheck was 5-700 depending on how many miles I had and what kind of extra pay I could get like driver assisted unloading, extra stops etc. my goal the whole time was to become an oo which I did after year 1. Phone Post 3.0

Isn't there a fair amount of financial risk to going owner operator? I only drove truck for 2 summers back in 1995 and 1996, so I'm by no means an expert. But from my understanding truck payments are pretty high, not to mention there is pretty high overhead with fuel, insurance, etc, and if that truck ain't moving there is no money coming in.

danggook - 10 years trucking, owner operator.

first year you do it you won't have any idea wtf you are doing for the most part. people aren't usually very eager to help either.

started off making .25/mile. weekly paycheck was 5-700 depending on how many miles I had and what kind of extra pay I could get like driver assisted unloading, extra stops etc. my goal the whole time was to become an oo which I did after year 1. Phone Post 3.0

forgive me for my question, as i know nothing about trucking, and i see that word thrown around a lot though, what exactly is an "owner operator"

oldnslow -
danggook - 10 years trucking, owner operator.

first year you do it you won't have any idea wtf you are doing for the most part. people aren't usually very eager to help either.

started off making .25/mile. weekly paycheck was 5-700 depending on how many miles I had and what kind of extra pay I could get like driver assisted unloading, extra stops etc. my goal the whole time was to become an oo which I did after year 1. Phone Post 3.0

Isn't there a fair amount of financial risk to going owner operator? I only drove truck for 2 summers back in 1995 and 1996, so I'm by no means an expert. But from my understanding truck payments are pretty high, not to mention there is pretty high overhead with fuel, insurance, etc, and if that truck ain't moving there is no money coming in.
Nah dude. lease on with a big company, your overhead is capped at about 80 a week including workman's comp, liability insurance, cargo insurance and comprehensive insurance.

get a used truck, granted now they are pricier at about 40-50k for a truck 5 years old cause of the dpf's but my first truck was 30k. payments of 1k or so and paid off in 3 years. and if you don't live or care about going to california get a truck with no dpf and still get one for about 30k.

leasing onto a big company can really help you get started, pay nothing for plates very little for I insurance and they help you with their buying power. when I buy tires I pay zero up front, the company pays it and divides payments by 10 and deducts from my settlements, while charging no interest for doing so. so instead of shelling out 3k all at once I pay 300 over the course of 10 weeks.

good to have a mechanic you know and trust to, mechanics will fuck you badly. going rate is 109/hour but I've got a mechanic that charges only 70 and is honest as hell. doesn't mark up parts at all.

recently I had a foot valve leak... outside mechanic quoted me 475 for part and 'few' hours to repair..so 8-900. give it to my guy and he did the repair part, labor plus I had him swap driver and passenger seat on my truck total repair was 403. Phone Post 3.0

Matt A Tat Tat On Dat Azz -
danggook - 10 years trucking, owner operator.

first year you do it you won't have any idea wtf you are doing for the most part. people aren't usually very eager to help either.

started off making .25/mile. weekly paycheck was 5-700 depending on how many miles I had and what kind of extra pay I could get like driver assisted unloading, extra stops etc. my goal the whole time was to become an oo which I did after year 1. Phone Post 3.0

forgive me for my question, as i know nothing about trucking, and i see that word thrown around a lot though, what exactly is an "owner operator"
I own the truck and operate it, so I get paid by load revenue, not by the mile Phone Post 3.0

danggook - 
Matt A Tat Tat On Dat Azz -
danggook - 10 years trucking, owner operator.

first year you do it you won't have any idea wtf you are doing for the most part. people aren't usually very eager to help either.

started off making .25/mile. weekly paycheck was 5-700 depending on how many miles I had and what kind of extra pay I could get like driver assisted unloading, extra stops etc. my goal the whole time was to become an oo which I did after year 1. Phone Post 3.0

forgive me for my question, as i know nothing about trucking, and i see that word thrown around a lot though, what exactly is an "owner operator"
I own the truck and operate it, so I get paid by load revenue, not by the mile Phone Post 3.0

how much more $$ do you make versus by the mile?

Matt A Tat Tat On Dat Azz - 
danggook - 
Matt A Tat Tat On Dat Azz -
danggook - 10 years trucking, owner operator.

first year you do it you won't have any idea wtf you are doing for the most part. people aren't usually very eager to help either.

started off making .25/mile. weekly paycheck was 5-700 depending on how many miles I had and what kind of extra pay I could get like driver assisted unloading, extra stops etc. my goal the whole time was to become an oo which I did after year 1. Phone Post 3.0

forgive me for my question, as i know nothing about trucking, and i see that word thrown around a lot though, what exactly is an "owner operator"
I own the truck and operate it, so I get paid by load revenue, not by the mile Phone Post 3.0

how much more $$ do you make versus by the mile?

also, what are the type of requirements to be leased on with a big company?

vtfu..

Thanks danggook, good to know. VU. I take it "dpf" is some sort of emissions thing?

I'm surprised to hear how low a used truck is. What's the lifespan of a 5 year old tractor?

While I haven't double clutched anything in close to 20 years, I still pay to keep my CDL Class A up just in case. While it's not a job I want to do with a wife and kids, it seems like a good fall back if times get rough.

OK, I also keep the CDL for ego's sake too.

requirements vary by company companies like swift/knight/Werner want 6 months experience, year reccomended. its rec com ended you get your experience driving for them, so you learn the ins and outs of their system prior to becoming an oo.

the $ you make is significantly more than just driving for somebody, for example on a 1000 mile run I normally do, if I was making the most a company driver normally would make I'd net 400 bucks. more realistically its closer to 350.

as an owner op, the revenue can gross from 2000 to 3000 depending on what it is and who you are hauling for. fuel cost for a run like that on my truck is about 150 gallons, so slightly under 600 bucks.

now if you are leased on with swift or knight etc your revenue on a load like that will be about 1500ish so you'll only net 900, THATS because those companies pay you a flat rate per mile instead of the actual market value. they pocket the difference . Phone Post 3.0

oldnslow - Thanks danggook, good to know. VU. I take it "dpf" is some sort of emissions thing?

I'm surprised to hear how low a used truck is. What's the lifespan of a 5 year old tractor?

While I haven't double clutched anything in close to 20 years, I still pay to keep my CDL Class A up just in case. While it's not a job I want to do with a wife and kids, it seems like a good fall back if times get rough.

OK, I also keep the CDL for ego's sake too.
5 year old tractor generally speaking has hit half life, assuming it has about 500k miles on it.

dpf is on all engines 2007 and up its a clean air thing, and is mandated only in california starting in 2014. every other state you can drive an older truck, no problem. Phone Post 3.0

danggook - 
oldnslow - Thanks danggook, good to know. VU. I take it "dpf" is some sort of emissions thing?

I'm surprised to hear how low a used truck is. What's the lifespan of a 5 year old tractor?

While I haven't double clutched anything in close to 20 years, I still pay to keep my CDL Class A up just in case. While it's not a job I want to do with a wife and kids, it seems like a good fall back if times get rough.

OK, I also keep the CDL for ego's sake too.
5 year old tractor generally speaking has hit half life, assuming it has about 500k miles on it.

dpf is on all engines 2007 and up its a clean air thing, and is mandated only in california starting in 2014. every other state you can drive an older truck, no problem. Phone Post 3.0

I figured if it was about California it had to be an emissions/clean air thing.

When I drove truck I ran for NorthAmerican Van Lines, doing household. Did long haul OTR, but also had to lump furniture in and out of residences - not to mention navigate an 18 wheeler into cramped residential areas to get to the customer's house.

Think if I ever went back to trucking it would not be as a bedbugger.

those moving guys make bank if they are owner ops. they stay busy as hell too and iirc from talking to one of them they hire temp workers to do the lumping Phone Post 3.0

I worked in a chemical plant, and had to occasionally pull trailers across a public road that ran through the middle of the plant with our yard mule.

So they paid for me to get my CDL, as well as Tanker and HAZMAT endorsements.

I left that job about 4 years ago, and don't intend to EVER use the CDL again! My hat is off to you long-haul guys, I could not do what you do.