How to sharpen a knife

without wet stones.

Everything I see online shows wet stones. I don't have any. What is the next best method?

FYI I want to sharpen a couple of pocket knives, my Becker BK2, and some cooking knives. What is the best non-wet stone method?

How bad are your edges? Do you have any fine grit sandpaper? Phone Post

stevekt - 

How bad are your edges? Do you have any fine grit sandpaper? Phone Post


I have not sharpened any of them ever. I mean, I have sharpened some of my kitchen knifes in the past but I lost the sharpening steel and they are dull as shit now. I want to get all of my blades in great shape especially the Becker.

And no on the sandpaper.

I am looking on Amazon. Are the $12.00 stones that bad? Would it be better than nothing? Looking at this: http://www.amazon.com/Whetstone-Cutlery-Two-Sided-Stone/dp/B0055B2RGO/ref=reg_hu-rd_dp_img

Asked the same question a few months ago. I got the Spyderco Sharpmaker. Great product! Keeps my knives very sharp, easy to use.

There were a couple of very helpful knife experts that tried to talk me into using wet stones. They said it was the best way to get the knives razor sharp, while I don't doubt them I don't want to keep practicing until I get it perfect. I got the impression they wanted sharpening to be your hobby. They seemed to really enjoy the fine art of sharpening but I just wanted to make sure I had a sharp knife. I have enough hobbies.

You'll get some good responses from some of the guys here but for the money & ease of sharpening I'm very happy with the Sharpmaker.

Everyone has their preferences but I like to use diamonds to rebevel a bad edge, ceramic to touch up decent edge, and leather to strop.

If your edges are bad then you need to rebevel and will need something aggressive like diamonds or a coarse stone. You should consider getting a good sharpening system for your Becker. Phone Post

Do you have an unglazed flower pot? Phone Post

Throw them out, buy new knives.

stevekt - 

Everyone has their preferences but I like to use diamonds to rebevel a bad edge, ceramic to touch up decent edge, and leather to strop.

If your edges are bad then you need to rebevel and will need something aggressive like diamonds or a coarse stone. You should consider getting a good sharpening system for your Becker. Phone Post


Anything wrong with the $12 wet stones on Amazon? I am looking at this. http://www.amazon.com/Whetstone-Cutlery-Two-Sided-Stone/dp/B0055B2RGO/ref=reg_hu-rd_dp_img

I am also wanting to buy a nice chefs nice. $100-$200 range. I would want to take good care of it.

I hear what greenhornet is saying about not wanting to make this into a hobby but I wouldn't be against using a wet stone now and then. I will not be using diamonds or re-beveling any edges. Not anytime soon really.

I am looking for something quick, easy, and cheap. the Sharpmaster is more than I want to spend.

I do have one of these but have never used it. I am afraid if I use it wrong it will fuck up my blades. http://www.amazon.com/Lansky-PS-MED01-BladeMedic/dp/B0085PPSIQ/ref=sr_1_8?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1383686022&sr=1-8&keywords=spyderco+sharpmaker

Oldtimers use to use newspaper to sharpen knives. Never tried myself though. I do remember barbers using leather straps to sharpen straight razors.

I keep finding these bushcraft videos on how to sharpen knives and they are using fucking wetstones. WTF is bushcraft like about using a wetstone?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4--HIDogrc8
The scary sharp method using sheets of micron paper.

jrrrrr - Oldtimers use to use newspaper to sharpen knives. Never tried myself though. I do remember barbers using leather straps to sharpen straight razors.

You are referring to stropping, which is the final step of aligning the edge of a blade that has already been honed to razor sharpness.

A lot of guys--including some posters on this forum--like the Spyderco Sharpmaker. It's supposedly a lot easier to use that traditional stones because it's much harder to fuck up the angle.

A friend who sells high end custom knives told me to get one. I have it, but I've never had a ton of luck--the roughest stones just don't seem aggressive enough--even for barely used blades.

Sharpmaker is great for touching up and maintaining edges that are in decent shape. It is not the best for rebeveling an edge that is in bad shape. It can be done but will take many strokes because the brown stones are not that aggressive. I would not recommend the Spyderco diamond triangle stones. I have them and don't care for them. Phone Post

Phuckles - I do have one of these but have never used it. I am afraid if I use it wrong it will fuck up my blades. http://www.amazon.com/Lansky-PS-MED01-BladeMedic/dp/B0085PPSIQ/ref=sr_1_8?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1383686022&sr=1-8&keywords=spyderco+sharpmaker

I would never use a pull through sharpener. Phone Post

I have the Sharpmaker. It works great. Bought the diamond and extra fine rods too. Dull knives piss me off. Phone Post 3.0

When you write "wet stones" do you mean Japanese water stones, or whetstones (such as Arkansas stones?)If you don't want to learn to hold a consistent angle and practice, you'll need something that finds the angle for you. Spyderco's Sharpmaker won't hold the blade at an angle, but will make it fairly easy to hold and find the angle. Sandpaper/scary sharp is cheaper than buying stones, but gives the same issues with you having to learn to hold the angle.

Kitchen knives complicate things some, since the Sharpmaker is kind of a pain with longer knives, and you might not get the level of refinement you want anyway (at least if you like anything even close to a mirror edge for cooking).

There are pull through devices, both electric (a la Chef's Choice machines) and manual. I don't know if they're versatile enough for your non-kitchen knives, and very few of them don't suck.

Maybe get a Sharpmaker, get a pro to do your kitchen knives.... and do any resetting of bevels should you need that (or thinning behind the edge). Unless and until you want to learn to use whetstones or do "scary sharp" or lay out the bucks for a jig like the Apex Pro (which also has a bit of a learning curve, truth).

At least these are my thoughts for now. I know more about sharpening kitchen knives than hunting/camping/weapons knives, so maybe my emphases aren't your own.

Ali - When you write "wet stones" do you mean Japanese water stones, or whetstones (such as Arkansas stones?)If you don't want to learn to hold a consistent angle and practice, you'll need something that finds the angle for you. Spyderco's Sharpmaker won't hold the blade at an angle, but will make it fairly easy to hold and find the angle. Sandpaper/scary sharp is cheaper than buying stones, but gives the same issues with you having to learn to hold the angle.

Kitchen knives complicate things some, since the Sharpmaker is kind of a pain with longer knives, and you might not get the level of refinement you want anyway (at least if you like anything even close to a mirror edge for cooking).

There are pull through devices, both electric (a la Chef's Choice machines) and manual. I don't know if they're versatile enough for your non-kitchen knives, and very few of them don't suck.

Maybe get a Sharpmaker, get a pro to do your kitchen knives.... and do any resetting of bevels should you need that (or thinning behind the edge). Unless and until you want to learn to use whetstones or do "scary sharp" or lay out the bucks for a jig like the Apex Pro (which also has a bit of a learning curve, truth).

At least these are my thoughts for now. I know more about sharpening kitchen knives than hunting/camping/weapons knives, so maybe my emphases aren't your own.

Something that will work well with all kinds of knives is preferred. Kitchen, bushcraft, and pocket knives. Phone Post

You can use a rolled down car window.

Glass and ceramic will sharpen knives. True story bros.