I can't get the sauce for my lo mein right

(inspired by King Trav's egg in his fried rice thread)

I enjoy chinese good take-out lo mein. It's such a simple ass dish though, so why spend 7-8 bucks when I want it. The key is getting that brown sauce that the noodles veg and meat seem to be covered in.

I googled it, i found one guy claiming a "3-2-1" sauce was the key to duplicating chinese take out taste (3 parts soy sauce, 2 parts oyster sauce, 1 part sesame oil), i've tried it and it's not quite right, ive tried playing around with these three ingredients.

So any thoughts?

Two words: Mexican Semen.

Take a look in the Kitchen, next time you're there.

Real answers only please. I tried this joker's suggestion, the end product was way too spicy!

You have to add the cream of sum yung gai! Phone Post 3.0

DomenicVelluso - You have to add the cream of sum yung gai! Phone Post 3.0

Does Kikkoman make that?!

MSG

Did you add some water to create more sauce, then some corn syrup to thicken it?

2 tablespoons soy sauce, or more, to taste
2 teaspoons sugar
1 teaspoon sesame oil
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger

fob - Did you add some water to create more sauce, then some corn syrup to thicken it?


Is that what they are talking about when they say a "starch slurry"?
I did neither but I will try it, thanks fob.

GenErick -
2 tablespoons soy sauce, or more, to taste
2 teaspoons sugar
1 teaspoon sesame oil
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger


Really, sugar? Table sugar? And I'm not a huge fan of ginger. But I'll give this a try. Thank you sir!

yep, the salty/sourness in the others cover it up.

interesting, well like i said, ill try it out

groundfighter2000 -
DomenicVelluso - You have to add the cream of sum yung gai! Phone Post 3.0

Does Kikkoman make that?!
Kikomans sister company, Sum Yung Ho Imports Ltd Phone Post 3.0

groundfighter2000 -
fob - Did you add some water to create more sauce, then some corn syrup to thicken it?


Is that what they are talking about when they say a "starch slurry"?
I did neither but I will try it, thanks fob.

GenErick -
2 tablespoons soy sauce, or more, to taste
2 teaspoons sugar
1 teaspoon sesame oil
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger


Really, sugar? Table sugar? And I'm not a huge fan of ginger. But I'll give this a try. Thank you sir!
Corn starch and water as thickening agent Phone Post 3.0

the OG is chow fun today...

Try some Hoisin, monica.

The Adversary - Try some Hoisin, monica.

I love me some Hoisin, but never thought it would be an ingredient in lo mein sauce, it's worth a try though

I sell cream of sum yung guy.

130.00 per ounce

only 3 ounces per customer please

Rambo John J - I sell cream of sum yung guy.

130.00 per ounce

only 3 ounces per customer please

This has already been mentioned. Thanks though. I will try it.

groundfighter2000 - 
Rambo John J - I sell cream of sum yung guy.

130.00 per ounce

only 3 ounces per customer please

This has already been mentioned. Thanks though. I will try it.

This sounds interesting, I might have to look it up.

DomenicVelluso - 
groundfighter2000 -
fob - Did you add some water to create more sauce, then some corn syrup to thicken it?


Is that what they are talking about when they say a "starch slurry"?
I did neither but I will try it, thanks fob.

GenErick -
2 tablespoons soy sauce, or more, to taste
2 teaspoons sugar
1 teaspoon sesame oil
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger


Really, sugar? Table sugar? And I'm not a huge fan of ginger. But I'll give this a try. Thank you sir!
Corn starch and water as thickening agent Phone Post 3.0


oops..just realized I wrote corn syrup instead of starch.  Most asian dishes use corn starch to thicken up the sauces.