Identity theft - Anyone deal with this?

Checked my credit report when I just tried to buy a car and found a flag for an account that has gone to collections for $3k from Sprint.  There were also inquiries from Target, Walmart and Verizon about obtaining credit, but it doesn't look like those went anywhere.  My score dropped 100pts because of it.  I never got any calls about it, emails, snail mail, nothing.   I have never had an account with Sprint and don't live in the state that the account was created in (Georgia).  Sprint is giving me the runaround because I can't verify the account number or account address, so they won't tell me shit about it.  What the hell am I supposed to do here?

i am no help. but google will be a good start

Talked to Sprint's fraud department and filled out all of their forms, filed a police report and attached it and mailed it out.  Supposedly this will all go away in 30 days.

 

How do you get shit like this off of your credit report (Once Sprint says it was definitely fraud and wipes the balance) and what steps should I take to make sure this stops happening?  Whoever has my shit tried just six weeks ago opening that account at Verizon, so it's likely they will try again somewhere else.

Your shit's on the dark web. The credit bureaus have a process to get fraud removed, check their websites. Look into putting a credit lock on yourself. You'll have to call the credit bureau ahead of time for any new accounts or lines of credit. Usage on your info can pop up years from now, so keep it locked for a while.

Meals Hitman -

Talked to Sprint's fraud department and filled out all of their forms, filed a police report and attached it and mailed it out.  Supposedly this will all go away in 30 days.

 

How do you get shit like this off of your credit report (Once Sprint says it was definitely fraud and wipes the balance) and what steps should I take to make sure this stops happening?  Whoever has my shit tried just six weeks ago opening that account at Verizon, so it's likely they will try again somewhere else.

You have several options.

You can put a fraud alert on your credit and since you were a victim it can be active for 5 years, IIRC. A fraud alert will let merchant know that when someone tries to open credit in your name (including you) that you’ve been a victim and to contact you for confirmation. People can still run credit checks on you with no problem. Bear in mind that merchants are not legally required to contact you to confirm before establishing the account but all the big names will cause you have them dead to rights if they don’t. 

Or you can put a credit freeze on yourself. You have to do it with all 3 credit bureaus. Each one may charge you $10 for it. The difference with a credit freeze is that nobody can even run your credit score so it should be impossible for anyone to open an account. 

The down side to these is that you can’t get instant credit for yourself any more. And to open any account or get a loan you must remove the freeze which may take a few days to go thru on all credit bureaus. 

Happened to me a long time ago, I got some ID Fraud people calling me up and they gave me some password thing for security which I've never had to use since. There was a couple more attempts but it stopped fairly quickly. But after that I had way more trouble using my cards for shadier things like gambling, or big one-time purchases, because there would always be some flag on the account as a precautionary measure, so I would have to call up to confirm

As Pfsjkd said, contact Equifax and TransUnion and let them know you were a victim of Identity fraud.

They will put an alert and every time someone wants to go for a loan, the financial institution will contact you at the telephone number you provided for the Hawk Alert to confirm whether or not you applied for a loan.

Also, find out if your SSN was used, if so, contact the Gov't Dept and let them know that your SSN is compromised.

Also, check with US Postal to see if anyone put an extra address on your person so they could mail forward...again, let them know you were a victim of identity fraud.

Lifelock is good. I got scammed into revealing a lot of personal info on the web. So I went with them after several recommendations.

They broke it down for me very well...what might dangerous and what was not. They monitor anything to with your credit and any questionable transactions.

Also check with any credit card companies and banks to see if there has been any unusual activity on either.

 

I froze my accounts on the 3 credit agencies, will this help me not to have this happen?

Well, some asshole stole my debit card info and tried, unsuccessfully, to use it on an atm 2-3 tries before I cancelled it. had to get new debit card right about the time when I needed to pay some bills. Real hassle.

So did someone get a headlock on your identity? 

My father did, was an absolute nightmare.  The guy was opening credit cards and even tried to buy a car, the dealership saw the credit alert and actually put the guy on the phone with my dad as he waited at the dealership.

 

Police involved and everything, not sure how prosecution went.  The guy was calling my parents house threatening my father and waiting out front of the house and stealing their mail.

 

Place all the freezes and alerts you can, my dad didn’t use his credit for years, still doesn’t, opens everything in my mom’s name.

Tim Duncan - I froze my accounts on the 3 credit agencies, will this help me not to have this happen?

Depends. Some thieves go for secured cards with stolen info. Some of those cards are only like 300 bucks with a security deposit that's needed.
Some of these CC companies don't vet as well and some of their security features are kinda minimum so that a purposely misspelled name or DOB that's a day off won't trigger the credit bureaus' alerts.

So the thieves build up credit as fast as they can with a Secured card. They get the credit limit increase that the company offers because the thieves played by the rules, used the card and paid their limits and then buy-bye.

Tim Duncan - I froze my accounts on the 3 credit agencies, will this help me not to have this happen?


Yes. It works like this; whenever you (or someone else) tries to open credit in your name (credit card, store card, car loan, mortgage) the creditor runs a credit report on your name and SSN. If you have a freeze in place, the credit bureau will not provide ANY info on your credit. The creditor now cannot tell if you have good or bad credit and will most likely not extend the credit to you.



The bad part is this prevents you, yourself from opening a legitimate account unless you unlock your credit, which may take paying the credit bureau another $10.  There are a couple ways to make it slightly easier to get credit when you have freezes in place; 1) try to find out exactly which credit bureau the company sends their credit inquiries to. This way, you can just unlock your credit with that one bureau long enough for the company to check you out, then put the freeze back in place. 2) Get the TrueID app from TransUnion. They have a free tier which allows you to lock or unlock your credit report right from the app. So you might be able to have your creditor use TransUnion and you could unlock it just long enough for them to get your report then lock it back up again. One of the other credit bureaus has the same thing in their app, but you can only do it if you sign up for a monthly fee. Fuck that noise.

FerrisWheeler - 
Tim Duncan - I froze my accounts on the 3 credit agencies, will this help me not to have this happen?

Depends. Some thieves go for secured cards with stolen info. Some of those cards are only like 300 bucks with a security deposit that's needed.
Some of these CC companies don't vet as well and some of their security features are kinda minimum so that a purposely misspelled name or DOB that's a day off won't trigger the credit bureaus' alerts.

So the thieves build up credit as fast as they can with a Secured card. They get the credit limit increase that the company offers because the thieves played by the rules, used the card and paid their limits and then buy-bye.


This should start to go down with the advent of chip enabled credit cards. Although, US credit card companies don't exploit the full power of the chip and PIN like they do in Europe.



When France started chip and PIN cards, credit card fraud dropped 80% in the first year.

pfsjkd - 
FerrisWheeler - 
Tim Duncan - I froze my accounts on the 3 credit agencies, will this help me not to have this happen?

Depends. Some thieves go for secured cards with stolen info. Some of those cards are only like 300 bucks with a security deposit that's needed.
Some of these CC companies don't vet as well and some of their security features are kinda minimum so that a purposely misspelled name or DOB that's a day off won't trigger the credit bureaus' alerts.

So the thieves build up credit as fast as they can with a Secured card. They get the credit limit increase that the company offers because the thieves played by the rules, used the card and paid their limits and then buy-bye.


This should start to go down with the advent of chip enabled credit cards. Although, US credit card companies don't exploit the full power of the chip and PIN like they do in Europe.



When France started chip and PIN cards, credit card fraud dropped 80% in the first year.


Yep, most companies in US have started with Chip and Pin though.

Also, companies have finally started to tell people not to use consecutive or repeated numbers. This has also helped them quite a bit.

To add, I know of a couple of our clients have implemented security codes or passwords for people that have been victims of fraud. IMHO, every account holder should have one.

^ " ...not to use consecutive... ( for their PINS )

FerrisWheeler - 
pfsjkd - 
FerrisWheeler - 
Tim Duncan - I froze my accounts on the 3 credit agencies, will this help me not to have this happen?

Depends. Some thieves go for secured cards with stolen info. Some of those cards are only like 300 bucks with a security deposit that's needed.
Some of these CC companies don't vet as well and some of their security features are kinda minimum so that a purposely misspelled name or DOB that's a day off won't trigger the credit bureaus' alerts.

So the thieves build up credit as fast as they can with a Secured card. They get the credit limit increase that the company offers because the thieves played by the rules, used the card and paid their limits and then buy-bye.


This should start to go down with the advent of chip enabled credit cards. Although, US credit card companies don't exploit the full power of the chip and PIN like they do in Europe.



When France started chip and PIN cards, credit card fraud dropped 80% in the first year.


Yep, most companies in US have started with Chip and Pin though.

Also, companies have finally started to tell people not to use consecutive or repeated numbers. This has also helped them quite a bit.

To add, I know of a couple of our clients have implemented security codes or passwords for people that have been victims of fraud. IMHO, every account holder should have one.


The problem is that US credit card companies haven't really implemented chip and PIN. They have chip and signature, which does nothing to prevent unauthorized useage of the card if it's stolen. They felt that chip and PIN would have been too much of a leap for US card holders to embrace. Hopefully they go to it soon. It's much more secure.

pfsjkd - 
FerrisWheeler - 
pfsjkd - 
FerrisWheeler - 
Tim Duncan - I froze my accounts on the 3 credit agencies, will this help me not to have this happen?

Depends. Some thieves go for secured cards with stolen info. Some of those cards are only like 300 bucks with a security deposit that's needed.
Some of these CC companies don't vet as well and some of their security features are kinda minimum so that a purposely misspelled name or DOB that's a day off won't trigger the credit bureaus' alerts.

So the thieves build up credit as fast as they can with a Secured card. They get the credit limit increase that the company offers because the thieves played by the rules, used the card and paid their limits and then buy-bye.


This should start to go down with the advent of chip enabled credit cards. Although, US credit card companies don't exploit the full power of the chip and PIN like they do in Europe.



When France started chip and PIN cards, credit card fraud dropped 80% in the first year.


Yep, most companies in US have started with Chip and Pin though.

Also, companies have finally started to tell people not to use consecutive or repeated numbers. This has also helped them quite a bit.

To add, I know of a couple of our clients have implemented security codes or passwords for people that have been victims of fraud. IMHO, every account holder should have one.


The problem is that US credit card companies haven't really implemented chip and PIN. They have chip and signature, which does nothing to prevent unauthorized useage of the card if it's stolen. They felt that chip and PIN would have been too much of a leap for US card holders to embrace. Hopefully they go to it soon. It's much more secure.


Agreed, not enough of them have made their cards Chip and Pin enabled yet.

Yeh, not sure why I said " Most companies" ...I should have said " Some companies "