Important Lessons

1. First Important Lesson – Cleaning Lady.

During my second month of college, our professor gave us a pop quiz. I was a conscientious student and had breezed through the questions until I read the last one: “What is the first name of the woman who cleans the school?”

Surely this was some kind of joke. I had seen the cleaning woman several times. She was tall, dark-haired and in her 50′s, but how would I know her name?

I handed in my paper, leaving the last question blank. Just before class ended, one student asked if the last question would count toward our quiz grade. “Absolutely, ” said the professor.. “In your careers, you will meet many people.  All are significant.. They deserve your attention and care, even if all you do is smile and say “hello..”

I’ve never forgotten that lesson.. I also learned her name was Dorothy

2.  Second Important Lesson – Pickup in the Rain

One night, at 11:30 p.m., an older African American woman was standing on the side of an Alabama highway trying to endure a lashing rain storm. Her car had broken down and she desperately needed a ride.  Soaking wet, she decided to flag down the next car. A young white man stopped to help her, generally unheard of in those conflict-filled 1960′s.

The man took her to safety, helped her get assistance and put her into a taxicab. She seemed to be in a big hurry, but wrote down his address and thanked him. Seven days went by and a knock came on the man’s door. To his surprise, a giant console color TV was delivered to his home. A special note was attached.  It read:

“Thank you so much for assisting me on the highway the other night. The rain drenched not only my clothes, but also my spirits.  Then you came along.  Because of you, I was able to make it to my dying husband’s’ bedside just before he passed away… God bless you for helping me and unselfishly serving others.”

Sincerely,

Mrs. Nat King Cole.

3 – Third Important Lesson – Always remember those who serve.

In the days when an ice cream sundae cost much less, a 10-year-old boy entered a hotel coffee shop and sat at a table. A waitress put a glass of water in front of him.

“How much is an ice cream sundae?” he asked.  “Fifty cents,” replied the waitress.  The little boy pulled his hand out of his pocket and studied the coins in it. “Well, how much is a plain dish of ice cream?” he inquired. By now more people were waiting for a table and the waitress was growing impatient.. “Thirty-five cents,” she brusquely replied.  The little boy again counted his coins.  “I’ll have the plain ice cream,” he said.

The waitress brought the ice cream, put the bill on the table and walked away The boy finished the ice cream, paid the cashier and left..  When the waitress came back, she began to cry as she wiped down the table.  There, placed neatly beside the empty dish, were two nickels and five pennies..

You see,  he couldn’t  have the sundae, because he had to have enough left to leave her a tip.

4 – Fourth Important Lesson. – The Obstacle in Our Path.

In ancient times, a King had a boulder placed on a roadway.  Then he hid himself and watched to see if anyone would remove the huge rock.  Some of the King’s’ wealthiest merchants and courtiers came by and simply walked around it..  Many loudly blamed the King for not keeping the roads clear, but none did anything about getting the stone out of the way.  Then a peasant came along carrying a load of vegetables.

Upon approaching the boulder, the peasant laid down his burden and tried to move the stone to the side of the road.  After much pushing and straining, he finally succeeded. After the  peasant picked up his load of vegetables, he noticed a purse lying in the road where the boulder had been. The purse contained many gold coins and a note from the King indicating that the gold was for the person who removed the boulder from the roadway.

The peasant learned what many of us never understand!

Every obstacle presents an opportunity to improve our condition.

 

19 things to remember
 
  1. Accept the fact that some days you’re the pigeon - and some days you’re the statue!
 
  1. Always keep your words soft and sweet - just in case you have to eat them.
 
  1. Always read stuff that will make you look good if you die in the middle of it.
 
  1. Drive carefully - it’s not just cars that can be recalled by their Maker.
 
  1. If you can’t be kind, at least have the decency to be vague.
 
  1. If you lend someone $20 and never see that person again, it was probably worth it.
 
  1. It may be that your sole purpose in life is simply to serve as a warning to others.
 
  1. Never buy a car you can’t push.
 
  1. Never put both feet in your mouth at the same time, because then you won’t have a leg to stand on.
 
  1. Nobody cares if you can’t dance well. Just get up and dance.
 
  1. Since it’s the early worm that gets eaten by the bird, sleep late.
 
  1. The second mouse gets the cheese.
 
  1. When everything’s coming your way, you’re in the wrong lane.
 
  1. Birthdays are good for you. The more you have, the longer you live.
 
  1. You may be only one person in the world, but you may also be the world to one person.
 
  1. Some mistakes are too much fun to make only once.
 
  1. We could learn a lot from crayons. Some are sharp, some are pretty and some are dull. Some have weird
 
  1. names and all are different colors - but they all have to live in the same box.
 
  1. A truly happy person is one who can enjoy the scenery on a detour.
 
  1. Have an awesome day and know that someone has thought about you today.

Sub & VTFU

The Coffee Mug

Years ago when my husband and I were dating I purchased two coffee mugs; the kind that has your name on it and a description of what your name foretells and it was pretty accurate. People used to make fun of our corny coffee mugs but that's okay. I didn't purchase them to impress anyone.

We have had those mugs now for 25 years. They are crackled, worn and very faded and no longer usable.

In 2007 and into 2008 (and as of this writing, more surgeries in 2010 and 2011), I had a long battle with breast cancer – numerous surgeries; too many to count; chemo and radiation, more surgeries, infections. Pretending to be fearless and unafraid I forged onward with a smile and a joke. Or at least I tried until the demons took over. Underneath, only those closest to me and always there for me – my family – really knew I was cracking beneath the surface.

One morning, my husband Doug poured my coffee as he did every morning in my "Terri" cup. The cup could no longer take the heat. It finally cracked and broke. This was a sign to me. I lost it. I began to cry.

"Doug, what if I break? What if I die? This means something! I am broken! What if I can't be fixed?" I was hysterical.

He just hugged me and calmed me down. He quickly left the room and went to the basement. He came back with some ceramic glue. I could see the tears in his eyes. He took that mug and told me he was going to fix that mug and that nothing was going to happen to me. I would be healed and cancer was not going to "break" me.

Doug feverishly fixed that cup with such determination.

He did the same with me with his care. The cup is not the same strength as it was before (kind of like me) and I can no longer drink from it but it still sits in our cupboard.

I am the same but I am slightly altered; a little cracked but not completely broken. "Glued" back together of sorts. I will never forget that day my husband tried to save my favorite coffee mug. It was a turning point for both of us and all we had been holding in.

And that mug – like Doug –  will stay with me as long as I live.

An Hour With Daddy

Son: "Daddy, may I ask you a question?"

Dad: "Yeah sure, what is it?"

Son: "Daddy, how much do you make an hour?"

Dad: "That's none of your business. Why do you ask such a thing?"

Son: "I just want to know. Please tell me, how much do you make an hour?"

Dad: "If you must know, I make $100 an hour."

Son: "Oh! (With his head down).

Son: "Daddy, may I please borrow $50?"

The father was furious.

Dad: "If the only reason you asked that is so you can borrow some money to buy a silly toy or some other nonsense, then you march yourself straight to your room and go to bed. Think about why you are being so selfish. I work too hard everyday for such childish behavior."

The little boy quietly went to his room and shut the door.

The man sat down and started to get even angrier about the little boy's questions. How dare he ask such questions only to get some money?

After about an hour or so, the man had calmed down, and started to think:

Maybe there was something he really needed to buy with that $50 and he really didn't ask for money very often. The man went to the door of the little boy's room and opened the door.

Dad: "Are you asleep, son?"

Son: "No daddy, I'm awake".

Dad: "I've been thinking, maybe I was too hard on you earlier. It's been a long day and I took out my aggravation on you. Here's the $50 you asked for."

The little boy sat straight up, smiling.

Son: "Oh, thank you daddy!"

Then, reaching under his pillow he pulled out some crumpled up bills. The man saw that the boy already had money, started to get angry again. The little boy slowly counted out his money, and then looked up at his father.

Dad: "Why do you want more money if you already have some?"

Son: "Because I didn't have enough, but now I do. Daddy, I have $100 now. Can I buy an hour of your time? Please come home early tomorrow. I would like to have dinner with you."

The father was crushed. He put his arms around his little son, and he begged for his forgiveness. It's just a short reminder to all of you working so hard in life. We should not let time slip through our fingers without having spent some time with those who really matter to us, those close to our hearts. Do remember to share that $100 worth of your time with someone you love? If we die tomorrow, the company that we are working for could easily replace us in a matter of days. But the family and friends we leave behind will feel the loss for the rest of their lives. And come to think of it, we pour ourselves more into work than to our family.

The Price of Raising Kids

This is just too good not to pass on to all. Here is something absolutely positive for a change. I have repeatedly seen the breakdown of the cost of raising a child, but this is the first time I have seen the rewards listed this way. It's nice.


The government recently calculated the cost of raising a child from birth to 18 and came up with $160,140.00 for a middle income family. Talk about price shock! That doesn't even touch college tuition.


But $160,140.00 isn't so bad if you break it down. It translates into:


* $8,896.66 a year,

* $741.38 a month,
* $171.08 a week.
* A mere $24.24 a day!
* Just over a dollar an hour.


Still, you might think the best financial advice is; don't have children if you want to be 'rich.' Actually, it is just the opposite.


What do you get for your $160,140.00?


* Naming rights . First, middle, and last!

* Glimpses of God every day.
* Giggles under the covers every night.
* More love than your heart can hold.
* Butterfly kisses and Velcro hugs..
* Endless wonder over rocks, ants, clouds, and warm cookies.
* A hand to hold usually covered with jelly or chocolate.
* A partner for blowing bubbles and flying kites.
* Someone to laugh yourself silly with, no matter what the boss said or how your stocks performed that day.


For $160,140.00, you never have to grow up. You get to:


* finger-paint,

* carve pumpkins,
* play hide-and-seek,
* catch lightning bugs,
* never stop believing in Santa Claus.


You have an excuse to:


* keep reading the Adventures of Piglet and Pooh,

* watch Saturday morning cartoons,
* go to Disney movies, and
* wish on stars.


You get to frame rainbows, hearts, and flowers under refrigerator magnets and collect spray painted noodle wreaths for Christmas, hand prints set in clay for Mother's Day, and cards with backward letters for Father's Day .


For a mere $24.24 a day, there is no greater bang for your buck. You get to be a hero just for:


* retrieving a Frisbee off the garage roof,

* taking the training wheels off a bike,
* removing a splinter,
* filling a wading pool ,
* coaxing a wad of gum out of bangs, and
* coaching a baseball team that never wins but always gets treated to ice cream regardless.


You get a front row seat in history to witness the:

* First step,
* First word,
* First bra,
* First date,
* First time behind the wheel.


You get to be immortal. You get another branch added to your family tree, and if you're lucky, a long list of limbs in your obituary called grandchildren and great grandchildren. You get an education in psychology, nursing, criminal justice, communications, and human sexuality that no college can match..


In the eyes of a child, you rank right up there under God. You have all the power to heal a boo-boo, scare away the monsters under the bed, patch a broken heart, police a slumber party, ground them forever, and love them without limits, so one day they will, like you, love without counting the cost. That is quite a deal for the price!


Love & enjoy your children & grandchildren & great-grandchildren!


It's the best investment you'll ever make!
 

A Father Is

A father is a person who is forced to endure childbirth without an anesthetic.

He growls when he feels good and laughs very loud when he is scared half-to-death.

A father never feels entirely worthy of the worship in a child's eyes.

He is never quite the hero his daughter thinks. Never quite the man his son believes him to be. And this worries him sometimes. (So he works too hard to try to smooth the rough places in the road of those of his own who will follow him.)

A father is a person who goes to war sometimes ... and would run the other way except that war is part of an important job in his life (which is making the world better for his child than it has been for him).

Fathers grow older faster than other people, because they, in other wars, have to stand at the train station and wave goodbye to the uniform that climbs on board.

And, while mothers cry where it shows, fathers stand and beam ... outside ... and die inside.

Fathers are men who give daughters away to other men who aren't nearly good enough, so that they can have children that are smarter than anybody's.

Fathers fight dragons almost daily. They hurry away from the breakfast table off to the arena, which is sometimes called an office or a workshop. There they tackle the dragon with three heads: Weariness, Works, and Monotony. And they never quite win the fight, but they never give up.

Knights in shining armor; fathers in shiny trousers. There's little difference as they march away each workday.

~ Author Unknown ~
 

The Blindfold

Do you know the legend of the Cherokee Indian youth's rite of passage?

His father takes him into the forest, blindfolds him and leaves him alone.

He is required to sit on a stump the whole night and not remove the blindfold until the rays of the morning sun shine through it. He cannot cry out for help to anyone.

Once he survives the night, he is a MAN.

He cannot tell the other boys of this experience, because each lad must come into manhood on his own.

The boy is naturally terrified. He can hear all kinds of noises.

Wild beasts must surely be all around him.

Maybe even some human might do him harm.

The wind blew the grass and earth, and shook his stump, but he sat stoically, never removing the blindfold. It would be the only way he could become a man!

Finally, after a horrific night the sun appeared and he removed his blindfold.

It was then that he discovered his father sitting on the stump next to him. He had been at watch the entire night, protecting his son from harm.

Life is like a rite of passage for all of us.

We, too, are never alone. Even when we don't know it, God is watching over us, sitting on the stump beside us. When trouble comes, all we have to do is reach out to Him.

Moral of the story:
 
Just because you can't see God,

Doesn't mean He is not there.

"For we walk by faith, not by sight."
 

Strongest Dad in the World

 

I try to be a good father. Give my kids mulligans. Work nights to pay for their text messaging. Take them to swimsuit shoots. But compared with Dick Hoyt, I suck.

This love story began in Winchester , Mass. , 43 years ago, when Rick was strangled by the umbilical cord during birth, leaving him brain-damaged and  unable to control his limbs. "He'll be a vegetable the rest of his life;"  father, Dick, says doctors told him and his wife, Judy, when Rick was nine months old. "Put him in an institution."

But the Hoyts weren't buying it. They noticed the way Rick's eyes followed them around the room. When Rick was 11 they took him to the engineering department at Tufts University and asked if there was anything to help the boy  communicate. "No way," Dick says he was told. "There's nothing going on in  his brain." "Tell him a joke," Dick countered. They did. Rick laughed. Turns out a lot was going on in his brain.

Rigged up with a computer that allowed him to control the cursor by touching a switch with the side of his head, Rick was finally able to communicate. First words? "Go Bruins!" And after a high school classmate was paralyzed in an  accident and the school organized a charity run for him, Rick pecked out, "Dad,  I want to do that." Yeah, right. How was Dick, a self-described "porker" who never ran more than a mile at a time, going to push his son five miles? Still, he tried. "Then it was me who was handicapped," Dick says. "I was sore for two weeks."

That day changed Rick's life. "Dad," he typed, "when we were running, it felt like I wasn't disabled anymore!" And that sentence changed Dick's life. He became obsessed with giving Rick that feeling as often as he could. He got into such hard-belly shape that he and  Rick were ready to try the 1979 Boston Marathon.

"No way," Dick was told by a race official. The Hoyts weren't quite a single runner, and they weren't quite a wheelchair competitor. For a few years Dick and Rick just joined the massive field and ran anyway, then they found a way to get  into the race officially: In 1983 they ran another marathon so fast they made  the qualifying time for Boston the following year.

Then somebody said, "Hey, Dick, why not a triathlon?"   How's a guy who never learned to swim and hadn't ridden a bike since he was six going to haul his 110-pound kid through a triathlon? Still, Dick tried. Now they've done 212 triathlons, including four grueling 15-hour Ironman in Hawaii   . It must be a buzz kill to be a 25-year-old stud getting passed by an old guy  towing a grown man in a dinghy, don't you think?

Eighty-five times he's pushed his disabled son, Rick, 26.2 miles in marathons. Eight times he's not only pushed him 26.2 miles in a wheelchair but also towed him 2.4 miles in a dinghy while swimming and pedaled him 112 miles in a seat on  the handlebars--all in the same day. Dick's also pulled him cross-country  skiing, taken him on his back mountain climbing and once hauled him across the  U.S. on a bike. Makes taking your son bowling look a little lame, right? Hey,  Dick, why not see how you'd do on your own? "No way," he says. Dick does it  purely for "the awesome feeling" he gets seeing Rick with a cantaloupe smile as they run, swim and ride together.

This year, at ages 65 and 43, Dick and Rick finished their 24th Boston Marathon , in 5,083rd place out of more than 20,000 starters. Their best time'?  Two hours, 40 minutes in 1992--only 35 minutes off the world record, which, in  case you don't keep track of these things, happens to be held by a guy who was  not pushing another man in a wheelchair at the time.

"No question about it," Rick types. "My dad is the Father of the Century." And what has Rick done for his father? Not much--except save his life. And Dick  got something else out of all this too. Two years ago he had a mild heart attack  during a race. Doctors found that one of his arteries was 95% clogged. "If you  hadn't been in such great shape," one doctor told him, "you probably would've  died 15 years ago." So, in a way, Dick and Rick saved each other's life.

Rick, who has his own apartment (he gets home care) and works in Boston , and Dick, retired from the military and living in Holland , Mass. , always find ways to be together. They give speeches around the country and compete in some backbreaking race every weekend, including this Father's Day.

That night, Rick will buy his dad dinner, but the thing he really wants to give him is a gift he can never buy. "The thing I'd most like," Rick types, "is that my dad would sit in the chair and I would push him once."

Dick and Rick Hoyt


Strongest Dad in the World

Lessons on Life

 

There was a man who had four sons. He wanted his sons to learn not to judge things too quickly. So he sent them each on a quest, in turn, to go and look at a pear tree that was a great distance away.

The first son he sent in the winter, the second in the spring, the third in summer, and the youngest son in the fall.

When they had all gone and come back, he called them together to describe what they had seen.

The first son said that the tree was ugly, bent, and twisted.

The second son said no it was covered with green buds and full of promise.

The third son disagreed; he said it was laden with blossoms that smelled so sweet and looked so beautiful, it was the most graceful thing he had ever seen.

The last son disagreed with all of them; he said it was ripe and drooping with fruit, full of life and fulfillment.

The man then explained to his sons that they were all right, because they had each seen but only one season in the tree's life.

He told them that you cannot judge a tree, or a person, by only one season, and that the essence of who they are and the pleasure, joy, and love that come from that life can only be measured at the end, when all the seasons are up.

If you give up when it's winter, you will miss the promise of your spring, the beauty of your summer, fulfillment of your fall.

Moral:

Don't let the pain of one season destroy the joy of all the rest. Don't judge life by one difficult season. Persevere through the difficult patches and better times are sure to come.

"The old things are passing away, behold, all things are becoming new." Jesus
 

Dad has Many Names

 

We had gathered and seated ourselves around my parents' ancient oak table for another holiday dinner. Four generations at one table celebrating the passage of our lives together once again with traditions unique to our family.

After my father offered thanks for our many blessings, my nephew exclaimed "Thanks grandpa, now we can all eat."

One of the great grandchildren replied "Why do you call him "grandpa?" We call him poppa."

I surveyed my loved ones and realized that my Dad has many names:

  • Three brothers and two sisters call him Dad; and we know he loves us.
  • Mom calls him Clem or Dear, and we know he loves her.
  • My Brother Michael's 3 children call him Poppa and he loves them.
  • Kathy's kids call him G. P. and he loves them.
  • My kids call him Grandpa and he loves them too.
  • My cousins call him Uncle Clem, and he loves them too.
  • His former students called him Mr. Wiedman and knew him as a good math teacher with a great sense of humor and they loved him.
  • His buddies at church, in the coffee club and at physical therapy also call him Clem and he loves them too.

Now if you asked each of us to share our most treasured memories of time spent with him, most likely we would each have different stories. And if we did share such stories, probably each of us would find more reasons for loving him, discovering greater range and style than each of us experienced in our personal history of interaction.

He would not turn his back on any of us in a time of need nor would he hold a grudge against any of his grandchildren because they address him in their own style or against any of his loved ones because we don't all share the same stock of meaningful experiences in our memories of him.

World War II produced many heroes. One such man was Lieutenant Commander Butch O'Hare. He was a fighter pilot assigned to the aircraft carrier Lexington in the South Pacific.

One day his entire squadron was sent on a mission. After he was airborne, he looked at his fuel gauge and realized that someone had forgotten to top off his fuel tank.

He would not have enough fuel to complete his mission and get back to his ship.

His flight leader told him to return to the carrier. Reluctantly, he dropped out of formation and headed back to the fleet.

As he was returning to the mother ship, he saw something that turned his blood cold; a squadron of Japanese aircraft was speeding its way toward the American fleet.

The American fighters were gone on a sortie, and the fleet was all but defenseless. He couldn't reach his squadron and bring them back in time to save the fleet. Nor could he warn the fleet of the approaching danger. There was only one thing to do. He must somehow divert them from the fleet.

Laying aside all thoughts of personal safety, he dove into the formation of Japanese planes.

Wing-mounted 50 caliber's blazed as he charged in, attacking one surprised enemy plane and then another. Butch wove in and out of the now broken formation and fired at as many planes as possible until all his ammunition was finally spent.

Undaunted, he continued the assault. He dove at the planes, trying to clip a wing or tail in hopes of damaging as many enemy planes as possible, rendering them unfit to fly.

Finally, the exasperated Japanese squadron took off in another direction.

Deeply relieved, Butch O'Hare and his tattered fighter limped back to the carrier.

Upon arrival, he reported in and related the event surrounding his return. The film from the gun-camera mounted on his plane told the tale. It showed the extent of Butch's daring attempt to protect his fleet. He had, in fact, destroyed five enemy aircraft.

This took place on February 20, 1942 , and for that action Butch became the Navy's first Ace of W.W.II, and the first Naval Aviator to win the Congressional Medal of Honor.

A year later Butch was killed in aerial combat at the age of 29. His home town would not allow the memory of this WW II hero to fade, and today, O'Hare Airport in Chicago is named in tribute to the courage of this great man.

So, the next time you find yourself at O'Hare International, give some thought to visiting Butch's memorial displaying his statue and his Medal of Honor. It's located between Terminals 1 and 2.

SO WHAT DO THESE TWO STORIES HAVE TO DO WITH EACH OTHER?

Butch O'Hare was "Easy Eddie's" son.

Just This Once

 

Just for this morning, I am going to step over the laundry and pick you up and take you to the park to play.

Just for this morning, I will leave the dishes in the sink, and let you teach me how to put that puzzle of yours together.
 
Just for this afternoon, I will unplug the telephone and keep the computer off, and sit with you in the backyard and blow bubbles.
 
Just for this afternoon, I will not yell once, not even a tiny grumble, when you scream and whine for the ice cream truck, and I will buy you one if he comes by.
 
Just for this afternoon, I won't worry about what you are going to be when you grow up, or second guess every decision I have made where you are concerned.
 
Just for this afternoon, I will let you help me bake cookies, and I won't stand over you trying to fix them.
 
Just for this evening, I will hold you in my arms and tell you a story about how you were born and how much I love you.
 
Just for this evening, I will let you splash in the tub and not get angry.
 
Just for this evening, I will let you stay up late while we sit on the porch and count all the stars.
 
Just for this evening, I will snuggle beside you for hours,and miss my favorite TV shows.
 
Just for this evening when I run my finger through your hair as you pray, I will simply be grateful that God has given me the greatest gift ever given.

I will think about the mothers And fathers who are searching for their missing children,the mothers and fathers who are visiting their children's graves instead of their bedrooms, and mothers and fathers who are in hospital rooms watching their children suffer senselessly, and screaming inside that they can't handle it anymore.

This is my favorite one so far

 

Images of Father

 

4 YEARS OF AGE ~ My Daddy can do anything!
8 YEARS OF AGE ~ My Dad knows a lot! A whole lot!
12 YEARS OF AGE ~ My Father doesn't really know quite everything.
14 YEARS OF AGE ~ Naturally, Dad doesn't know that, either.
16 YEARS OF AGE ~ Dad? He's hopelessly old-fashioned!
18 YEARS OF AGE ~ That old man? He's way out of date!
25 YEARS OF AGE ~ Well, he might know a little bit about it.
35 YEARS OF AGE ~ Before we decide, let's get Dad's opinion.
45 YEARS OF AGE ~ Wonder what Dad would have thought about it?
65 YEARS OF AGE ~ Wish I could talk it over with Dad!
 

What Does Love Mean?

A group of professional people posed this question to a group of 4 to 8 year-olds, "What does love mean?"

The answers they got were broader and deeper than anyone could have imagined. See what you think:

- "When my grandmother got arthritis, she couldn't bend over and paint her toenails anymore. So my grandfather does it for her all the time, even when his hands got arthritis too. That's love." ~ Rebecca- age 8

- "When someone loves you, the way they say your name is different. You just know that your name is safe in their mouth." ~ Billy - age 4 (I love this one)

- "Love is when a girl puts on perfume and a boy puts on shaving cologne and they go out and smell each other." ~ Karl - age 5

- "Love is when you go out to eat and give somebody most of your French fries without making them give you any of theirs." ~ Chrissy - age 6

- "Love is what makes you smile when you're tired." ~ Terri - age 4

- "Love is when my mommy makes coffee for my daddy and she takes a sip before giving it to him, to make sure the taste is OK." ~ Danny - age 7

- "Love is when you kiss all the time. Then when you get tired of kissing, you still want to be together and you talk more. My Mommy and Daddy are like that. They look gross when they kiss" ~ Emily - age 8

- "Love is what's in the room with you at Christmas if you stop opening presents and listen." ~ Bobby - age 7 (Wow!)

- "If you want to learn to love better, you should start with a friend who you hate," ~ Nikka - age 6 (we need a few million more Nikka's on this planet)

- "Love is when you tell a guy you like his shirt, then he wears it everyday." ~ Noelle - age 7

- "Love is like a little old woman and a little old man who are still friends even after they know each other so well." ~ Tommy - age 6

- "Love is when Mommy gives Daddy the best piece of chicken." ~ Elaine-age 5

- "Love is when Mommy sees Daddy smelly and sweaty and still says he is handsomer than Robert Redford." ~ Chris - age 7

- "Love is when your puppy licks your face even after you left him alone all day." ~ Mary Ann - age 4

- "I know my older sister loves me because she gives me all her old clothes and has to go out and buy new ones." ~ Lauren - age 4

- "When you love somebody, your eyelashes go up and down and little stars come out of you." (what an image) ~ Karen - age 7

- "Love is when Mommy sees Daddy on the toilet and she doesn't think it's gross." ~ Mark - age 6

- "You really shouldn't say 'I love you' unless you mean it. But if you mean it, you should say it a lot. People forget." ~ Jessica - age 8