Invited to speak at a school for Constitution Day

Would be either a middle or high school. It sounds like they have a set presentation for us to learn (my legal department is signing up en masse), but I am sure the kids get to ask questions.

What OG rathole should I take them down? You don't ever have to speak to the cops? The right to AR15s and open carry? Recording people in public and the first amendment? You don't have to ID yourself? Refuse all roadside tests?

I like to watch live PD and stuff. If there was one thing it seems the public needs an education on its using their miranda rights. 

taxes are theft!

Sovereign Citizens that aren't driving, but are "travelling"


And how ID is needed to purchase groceries

no camping in the left lane

plant that fucking seed in their heads while they are young

maybe hearing it from fancy lawyers will get that shit to stick

Go straight into why income taxes are unconstitutional. 

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Taxation is theft 

 

 

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What Freedom of speech actually means, and how what you say on Twitter and social media has actual repercussions

The Supreme Court isn’t there to legislate. 

So this happened today. I was given an ACLU powerpoint and packet to work off of, and it mainly focused on the 1st, 4th and 14th. The only glaringly wrong thing I could find was that it said police need a warrant to search your person or property (police almost never get warrants except for houses and sometimes vehicles so I made the distinction when speaking).

It definitely skewed left but I just avoided that shit and kept it to the facts.

Kids were cool. I was more nervous doing that than talking to CEOs or any large group of professionals. Kids are intimidating. Luckily no one called me a faggot. I was surprised they were allowed to drop the occasional f-bomb or similar without any kind of reprimand. I did hear one kid sarcastically tell another not to say bitch because it is bullying.

About 4 of them were very engaged and asked all the questions, some other got into side conversations and the rest most zoned out (probably be me at that age). All in all, not a bad day. You could tell the teacher was a hippie. Talked about Woodstock and asked me to talk about Roe v. Wade re: Kavanaugh. Also the kids were all overly the Kap and his kneeling and couldn't believe that the first amendment didn't protect him from losing his job over it (if that's what happened).

Hammerstein -
Fake Pie - So this happened today. I was given an ACLU powerpoint and packet to work off of, and it mainly focused on the 1st, 4th and 14th. The only glaringly wrong thing I could find was that it said police need a warrant to search your person or property (police almost never get warrants except for houses and sometimes vehicles so I made the distinction when speaking).

It definitely skewed left but I just avoided that shit and kept it to the facts.

Kids were cool. I was more nervous doing that than talking to CEOs or any large group of professionals. Kids are intimidating. Luckily no one called me a faggot. I was surprised they were allowed to drop the occasional f-bomb or similar without any kind of reprimand. I did hear one kid sarcastically tell another not to say bitch because it is bullying.

About 4 of them were very engaged and asked all the questions, some other got into side conversations and the rest most zoned out (probably be me at that age). All in all, not a bad day. You could tell the teacher was a hippie. Talked about Woodstock and asked me to talk about Roe v. Wade re: Kavanaugh. Also the kids were all overly the Kap and his kneeling and couldn't believe that the first amendment didn't protect him from losing his job over it (if that's what happened).

"and it mainly focused on the 1st, 4th and 14th."

You should have gone on a diatribe about the 2nd!

Hah I brielfy mentioned it. The teacher said they were doing to cover all 27. I was likely I don't even know all 27. 

 

I did make a joke about the 3rd amendment and how they'll never hear much about that one. 

Fake Pie -
Hammerstein -
Fake Pie - So this happened today. I was given an ACLU powerpoint and packet to work off of, and it mainly focused on the 1st, 4th and 14th. The only glaringly wrong thing I could find was that it said police need a warrant to search your person or property (police almost never get warrants except for houses and sometimes vehicles so I made the distinction when speaking).

It definitely skewed left but I just avoided that shit and kept it to the facts.

Kids were cool. I was more nervous doing that than talking to CEOs or any large group of professionals. Kids are intimidating. Luckily no one called me a faggot. I was surprised they were allowed to drop the occasional f-bomb or similar without any kind of reprimand. I did hear one kid sarcastically tell another not to say bitch because it is bullying.

About 4 of them were very engaged and asked all the questions, some other got into side conversations and the rest most zoned out (probably be me at that age). All in all, not a bad day. You could tell the teacher was a hippie. Talked about Woodstock and asked me to talk about Roe v. Wade re: Kavanaugh. Also the kids were all overly the Kap and his kneeling and couldn't believe that the first amendment didn't protect him from losing his job over it (if that's what happened).

"and it mainly focused on the 1st, 4th and 14th."

You should have gone on a diatribe about the 2nd!

Hah I brielfy mentioned it. The teacher said they were doing to cover all 27. I was likely I don't even know all 27. 

 

I did make a joke about the 3rd amendment and how they'll never hear much about that one. 

When my wife was studying for the bar jokingly asked her what the 3rd amendment was. She gave me a blank stare and said "that's not going to be on the test".

Kids need to learn that the 1st amendment's freedom of speech isn't there to just protect what you want to hear. It's there to protect all speech, including "hate speech".

 

Kids also need to understand that the Bill of Rights protects those rights from the federal government. There are two key points to that which I believe kids need to understand, 1) that it's protecting these rights, not granting them. These are rights that the founding fathers believed that people automatically have as endowed by God (or nature). And 2) that these rights are protected from the government, but can be limited in certain situations by others. For example, it's not illegal for your employer to say that as part of your agreement to work with them, you agree not to comments on company matters outside the company. So it's not a violation of your freedom of speech to be fired by your employer because you were commenting about company business on social media 

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Shit, just realized this thread is almost a month old




Why did OP get arrested?






_

federalist and anti federalist papers.

selected passages from both sides that have proven true..the worst of it.

for example, federalist 46, the exact shit madison said would never happen (and if it did people would revolt and be able to over power the gov), has happened

great segway into why the founders thought people should have weapons equal to the gov, so they could actually defeat the government

also, the history of the 2a and why there shouldnt be gun control
 

sicko -

Kids need to learn that the 1st amendment's freedom of speech isn't there to just protect what you want to hear. It's there to protect all speech, including "hate speech".

 

Kids also need to understand that the Bill of Rights protects those rights from the federal government. There are two key points to that which I believe kids need to understand, 1) that it's protecting these rights, not granting them. These are rights that the founding fathers believed that people automatically have as endowed by God (or nature). And 2) that these rights are protected from the government, but can be limited in certain situations by others. For example, it's not illegal for your employer to say that as part of your agreement to work with them, you agree not to comments on company matters outside the company. So it's not a violation of your freedom of speech to be fired by your employer because you were commenting about company business on social media 

We covered the second part, as noted on my follow up. I wasn't going to do deep legal theory on them man. It's a little early for Locke and shit. 

Of course the ACLU materials said the 2nd was still being debated. Lol. They don't mention anything else in that context. It was mainly going over civil rights in the real world and then applying them to kids in school so I didn't feel compelled to give a 2nd amendment lesson.  It was fun enough going over first and fourth amendment rights in school and them asking me if they can tell the cops to shove it. Im sure everyone at my work is afraid thats what I did though (talked about the 2nd) :) 

How about that no one including the supreme court and our military take their oath to defend the constitution from enemies both foreign and domestic faithfully.

that the document has been misinterpreted, and changed based on popular opinion, the political climate and corporate influence.

That the founding fathers would roll over in their graves if they saw the bastardization of their legacy.

that our “heroes “ fighting wars are in most cases are breaking u.s. and international law.

thatd be a good start

So I am doing it again this year, though I got a middle school this year so I am worried they won't be as engaged.

I think for trolling, at the beginning I am going to tell them as part of this, they are required to stand with me and take a pledge of loyalty to the President of the United States, Donald Trump.