Is Kyokushin applicable at all to MMA?

Or is it completely useless in your opinion?

The Kyokushin guys I've met/trained with over the years can take a beating and are strong punchers and kickers.

They are fish out of water on the ground.

If you do the math a straight up and down Kyokushin guy will not do very well in MMA.

billyball2 - The Kyokushin guys I've met/trained with over the years can take a beating and are strong punchers and kickers.

They are fish out of water on the ground.

If you do the math a straight up and down Kyokushin guy will not do very well in MMA.

Obviously. We're not talking style v. style. 

 

We're talking about large chunks of striking discipline. I don't know of many kyokushin fighters besides GSP (and even then calling him a kyokushin fighter is a stretch).

I would put the level of usefulness about like Capoeira. Helps some but not gonna make you a consistent winner. 

Semmy Schilt and Tenshin come to mind. I know there are more.

I did it for 10 years in Australia. Cameron Quinn, Gary O'Neil etc, he wanted me to move down to his academy full time at one point. I said fuck that im going to university, because girls, and, uh, money. I think it's a good base for striking, it's no nonsense and you don't fuck around with light touch sparring bullshit in general. We also did a lot of regular kickboxing (just about as many classes of that vs traditional kyokushin mas oyama fuckin KIAI etc classes). 

Like whatsisface above said, fish out of water on the ground. I thought I was hot shit, went to a 'renshinkhan' class which was basically vale tudo, focused on BJJ, around the time of UFC 1 or a bit earlier. Got choked the fuck out almost instantly. Thought that was awesome and wanted to learn it, que switching to BJJ for the next few years. I still got pounded on the ground but it was vale tudo class so once I figured out a bit of takedown defense I got a bit back with sparring on the feet. 

this is all like 15+ years ago.

GSP has the kyokushin logo tattooed on him. I wanted to do that when I was 17/18. Gary O'Neil (was full contact champ for a while) has it also. Glad I didn't get that shit done. 

I even did a few classes when I was living in Singapore. It's a good workout, generally pretty fun classes. 

Captain 'Murica - Semmy Schilt and Tenshin come to mind. I know there are more.

Wasn't Tenshin kickboxing by 16? He was competing against elite strikers in Thailand as a teenager, he was doing Kyokushin that entire time?

Uhtred Ragnarson - 
Captain 'Murica - Semmy Schilt and Tenshin come to mind. I know there are more.

Wasn't Tenshin kickboxing by 16? He was competing against elite strikers in Thailand as a teenager, he was doing Kyokushin that entire time?




He started kyokushin at a very young age, and he started kickboxing at 13. I don't know if it was a complete switchover. I mentioned his name because he's probably known as a karate genius as much as a kickboxing genius.

GSP.

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They do not protect their heads very well.

A function of their tournament rules.

Rakoshi -

I would put the level of usefulness about like Capoeira. Helps some but not gonna make you a consistent winner. 

you must be the stupidest motherfucker alive, or are 10 years years old

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Bas and plenty of those guys have a Kyokushin background.

Pretty sure. Or at least their coach was a strong Kyokushin guy.

Any striking discipline that teaches balance and timing is good to have. 

de braco - 
Rakoshi -

I would put the level of usefulness about like Capoeira. Helps some but not gonna make you a consistent winner. 

you must be the stupidest motherfucker alive, or are 10 years years old




100

PeterIrl - GSP.

This 

Target_the_Gash -

It is never a bad thing to know how to kick well, what you do with it is probably up to you. 

At least they don't rely on katas and play fighting with people that don't fight back.

There are no katas in Kyokushin? Is this for real? 

 

If so, what is the hardest/most legit Kyokushin lineage you know of? Do any of them train punches to the face?

Mark Hunts Pet Monkey -

Any striking discipline that teaches balance and timing is good to have. 

I mean I box like 5-6x a week fwiw.

trying to think of a decent way to work on linear movement and my kicks and knees too.

Damn near any contact martial art will have SOME applicability, and it can add a nice wrinkle to your game, but in general, the less rules in the martial art, the more applicable it will be to MMA.  MMA striking will always have some separation from other striking arts due to the takedown concern, but aside from that, Muay Thai has the least restrictive set outside of Lethwei.  However, headbutts are illegal in MMA so take that away and you have Muay Thai with little hand protection (they don't use Thai gloves).  I've only dabbled in Kyokushin within the context of Muay Thai/MMA/General Striking, but the low kick is probably one of the better takeaways.  Kyokushin was what was mixed with Muay Thai and Western Boxing into what has become "Dutch-style" kickboxing.  

 

Just curious, I've noticed you seem to create threads about the merits of individual arts.  Are you trying to pick one?  If you're trying to figure out what's best, why don't just do MMA?  It's the most all-encompassing training of what's reasonably available.  

de braco - 
Rakoshi -

I would put the level of usefulness about like Capoeira. Helps some but not gonna make you a consistent winner. 

you must be the stupidest motherfucker alive, or are 10 years years old




Funny SIFU used to try to make fun of the Uchedeshi when they were not around. But I always knew those guys would have wiped out SIFU yellow tracksuit.



Rakoshi I responded to you over on the should wrestling be banned from UFC thread.


nek -

Damn near any contact martial art will have SOME applicability, and it can add a nice wrinkle to your game, but in general, the less rules in the martial art, the more applicable it will be to MMA.  MMA striking will always have some separation from other striking arts due to the takedown concern, but aside from that, Muay Thai has the least restrictive set outside of Lethwei.  However, headbutts are illegal in MMA so take that away and you have Muay Thai with little hand protection (they don't use Thai gloves).  I've only dabbled in Kyokushin within the context of Muay Thai/MMA/General Striking, but the low kick is probably one of the better takeaways.  Kyokushin was what was mixed with Muay Thai and Western Boxing into what has become "Dutch-style" kickboxing.  

 

Just curious, I've noticed you seem to create threads about the merits of individual arts.  Are you trying to pick one?  If you're trying to figure out what's best, why don't just do MMA?  It's the most all-encompassing training of what's reasonably available.  

No. Been rolling and doing Muay Thai since I was a kid. Currently boxing. 

 

Ive noticed a lot of high level fighters have been incorporating TMA more and more (Cejudo, McGregor, Yoel Romero, Pitbull In Bellator). It's very interesting, thinking outside the box is a must in MMA.