Is Rocksmith a good way to learn guitar?

So my daughter wants to learn to play guitar and wants the game Rocksmith.  Under the condition that I learn to play the bass so we can learn and play together.  

 

Anyone have any experience/stories about this game?

Its a fun way to get familiar enough with the guitar that it may be a catalyst for someone to put in time and effort and eventually learn how to play, but in and of itself, I don't think it would suffice as a teaching tool.

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i570k -

Its a fun way to get familiar enough with the guitar that it may be a catalyst for someone to put in time and effort and eventually learn how to play, but in and of itself, I don't think it would suffice as a teaching tool.

Thanks.  I was curious about it.  I know plenty of people I could pay to give lessons and whatnot also.

No, learn to read music and discover your own s.ty.le. Don't rely on virtual gear, learn to play clean before adding pedals and effects.

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Don’t play guitar but I do play bass...

Short answer is no. Rocksmith won’t really teach you anything more than mimicking. I don’t even think it’s very good for learning individual songs... However, it is a tool to get your daughter to play guitar and that will go far in teaching her fingers to move independently and to find the strings. I will plug it in whenever I just want to play songs I like without having to think about what I’m doing.

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It's fun but she'll pick up all kinds of bad habits.  It doesn't teach or stress technique 

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No the best way to learn is just pick it up and try to understand how to play on your own. You have to find your own voice first then start to look around at tutorials.

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You will be able to play songs they have but not understand why.   Bad habits can form .

Justinguitar.com would be a much better way to learn at home.  Rocksmith can be fun especially if you both are playing together but it should not be your main learning tool.  

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Thanks for the feedback.  Vote up to all.

I’ve been using it for a few months now & find that it helps a lot. If you really want to play you’ll have to move beyond it because it will only get you so far. I have been doing scales & chord progressions in my amp & then playing what I’ve learned from the Rocksmith on the amp. The toughest thing is to play with the music this is simply the best way to do it because it gives little chunks of the music while you’re learning then slowly progress as you start to pick it up. I am getting where I can play some songs with the music on a cd or on Youtube.

All that said, the other guys are not wrong you need to read music & learn a lot of fundementals to get you very far. But as tool, do yourself a favor & pick it up.

Absolutely yes!

I wish I had discovered it when I still had the time and passion to learn. Years back, I bought an acoustic and an electric with intention on learning. I “taught myself” as much as I could to get familiar, then had a buddy come over once a week to hang out to give me lessons. In the end, I barely learned anything. All I really got out of it was I could read tabs and play a few highly recognizable sections of songs. That was over the course of a year.

My kid picked up Rocksmith but then never played it. One day I picked it up and tried and had a lot of fun. In about a month of a couple hours each weekend, I learned more with that game than I did in a year of really trying. Especially to learn the chords.

For the life of me I couldn’t remember chords for shit, but there is like a zombie killing game where you have to hit certain chords to kill certain monsters. For some reason, the order and progression it teaches in was easy to pick up for me.

I wish I had that game when I had more time, and I am looking forward to one day playing the hell out of it again. If only it was out back when Guitar Hero was out on the PS2…

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My background: CIassically trained on guitar & piano. Also an early adopter of MIDI/digital recording tech.

I give this same advice regardless of instrument or angle on an OP’s question:

Take some lessons from a real human. If you can’t afford to take them often or for a long time, that’s fine; take them infrequently but still regularly, & quit when you have to. But commit to it regardless. YouTube & rhythm games are great & have their place, but they can’t look at you & tell you what you’re doing wrong, or make simple corrections that will save you years if not decades of progress. We have hundreds of years of working out the bugs of training already embedded in our culture; exploit that. Online tools are not a complete replacement.

Reading isn’t for everybody but it opens up a whole universe of information that is otherwise hard to get; no one in the history of ever has regretted learning to read.

end stock advice. My next post will focus on your specific question.

Happiness Bunny -

No, learn to read music and discover your own s.ty.le. Don't rely on virtual gear, learn to play clean before adding pedals and effects.

This is a good way to make your daughter quit after a week. 

 

You’re not going to learn theory and all that shit using rocksmith, but depending on age and motivation, it’s a good way to have fun and see if you’re interested and hopefully build the interest to actually learn to play for real.

Here’s where Rocksmith excels:

-It can be fun. Anything that gets you playing regularly & in the habit of practicing/learning is a good thing.

-It has a logical progression, & an AI that (at least on paper) is supposed to evaluate your abilities based on your score accuracy, then adjust to those abilities. I personally found the AI to not work as advertised, but probably only because I’m not a beginner & I might have been impatient with it. Also, anyone experienced with both real instruments & rhythm games can tell you about the technology gap between what the games expect vs what the ear hears; rhythm games are about as good with feel today as drum machines were in the mid '80s. We’re still not quite there yet, but Rocksmith is better in this regard than everything else in the rhythm game category.

-It can get you up & running in a hurry.

-It comes with a free library of virtual hardware that would have cost you a fortune 30 years ago.

Where it fails:

-It might be too fun. If the gameplay satisfies your music bug in & of itself, you might never move beyond it. You won’t be compelled to learn outside of it, to play with others, or to play for others. If it’s just a game to you, then it’s learning to beat Donkey Kong & translates to nothing in the outside world. You can master the game in 5 years & still be playing at a 6 month middle school band level. I guarantee there will be an example of this posting in this thread at some point, but I’m still hopeful he’ll move on & thus I’m trying not to bust his balls. EDIT: Eh, fuck it. He plays terribly & his advice is shit. Please God do not listen to whatever PJ has to say about this topic.

-You don’t learn how to keep time on your own, as it’s always providing time for you. That’s an essential skill that will slow your progress playing with or for others.

-You’re learning to read Rocksmith, & not how to read. Which means you’re locked into reading only Rocksmith, & can only learn what’s available via Rocksmith’s DLC. You’re fucked if you want to move outside that relatively small library.

-The virtual hardware might encourage you to learn sloppy technique (although this is also true if you purchase the actual hardware & become dependent on it).

Oh & with that all said, I personally prefer Rock Band 3’s Pro Mode for rhythm games, but it has the same flaws.

But you can play a legit 5 piece act with it as a group; it’s not just strings.

BarkLikeADog - My background: CIassically trained on guitar & piano. Also an early adopter of MIDI/digital recording tech.

I give this same advice regardless of instrument or angle on an OP’s question:

Take some lessons from a real human. If you can’t afford to take them often or for a long time, that’s fine; take them infrequently but still regularly, & quit when you have to. But commit to it regardless. YouTube & rhythm games are great & have their place, but they can’t look at you & tell you what you’re doing wrong, or make simple corrections that will save you years if not decades of progress. We have hundreds of years of working out the bugs of training already embedded in our culture; exploit that. Online tools are not a complete replacement.

Reading isn’t for everybody but it opens up a whole universe of information that is otherwise hard to get; no one in the history of ever has regretted learning to read.

end stock advice. My next post will focus on your specific question.

Damn.  I liked you before this thread but now we’re dating.

I had a friend give me an acoustic guitar.  Turns out it’s a pretty good one.  I want to learn to play so bad but I have no idea where to start.

Thanks for the advice.