Katana's are banned!

 LOL

This is a link of the WotC D&D forum and what is banned as discussion.  Only geeks could get Katana's banned as a topic.

http://forums.gleemax.com/showthread.php?p=13609710#post13609710



From my cold, dead, fingers!







 Katanas are overrated.

Give me a quality longsword and I'll kick ye asses back to Kyoto you slant eyed fucks!

 *sics Ogami Itto on thread*

i must agree with lilliputian73. i have a katana that was made in 1790. while it's well balanced and finely crafted, so are my angus trim and albion and arms & armor single hand swords and longswords (all extremely high quality swordmakers with attention to detail of surviving examples of originals in museums). i much prefer the handling of my german longsword to my katana.

 

Blasphemy!

This outrage will not stand!

calls 1-800-rent-a-ninja

ignores irony of calling ninjas over a samurai weapon

 I called, but when all the ninja came they were sporting longswords.

Apparently ninjas aren't dumb

Ther're germen ninjas

Why the hell are D&D novels banned from discussion on the boards? Administrators are forbidden ("upon pain of losing their jobs") from ever discussing or allowing discussion of the novels.

Why?

Sounds shady to me.

fos

If Bloodsport taught me anything, it's that you cannot get katana sword by stealing, you must earn it!

DoctorLizardo - i must agree with lilliputian73. i have a katana that was made in 1790. while it's well balanced and finely crafted, so are my angus trim and albion and arms & armor single hand swords and longswords (all extremely high quality swordmakers with attention to detail of surviving examples of originals in museums). i much prefer the handling of my german longsword to my katana.
 


Which Albions do you own? I have the next-gen Squire and the squire line viking sword. The NG Squire is probably the best handling single hander I have ever tried. I also have friends who have some of the big longswords/warswords, like the Baron and the Regent, and its such a surprise when you pick them up for the first time and feel how fast they are.

it's the talhoffer, a type XVa blade. as far as performance, only atrim's can compare to albion's next generation and museum line, though certain arms & armor offerings exhibit excellent performance.

DoctorLizardo - it's the talhoffer, a type XVa blade. as far as performance, only atrim's can compare to albion's next generation and museum line, though certain arms & armor offerings exhibit excellent performance.


Nice. I've been considering the talhoffer or one of the others with the same blade. I agree that Atrims are on par with Albions as far as performance goes, I have the 1517 aka Phat Bastard, but the Albions are miles ahead when it comes to aesthetics. Bringing in Peter Johnsson to design and make the prototypes was a brilliant move by albion. Because of him their swords are the most accurate production replicas of historical european swords on the market.

all my atrims definately look nasty, but they cut & thrust nasty, too. i'm having christian fletcher redo all the hilts and make scabbards for them so they'll probably look on par with albion's swords.

 

einar, i'm pretty sure the ringeck and fiore use the same blade as the talhoffer. any of the three would be an awesome choice for use in the 15th century liechtenauer style of medieval combat.

You do Liechtenauer? Are you a member of a HEMA group? Arma perhaps? I'm an honorary member of Schola Gladiatoria in the UK, but I dont... train or anything. I just like swords, and I'm doing my BA in archaeology about them.

And Fletcher is an artist, really, however the Atrim blades still look too machined to me, especially the fullered ones. In most historical swords, the fuller will taper along with the blade, but in Angus's blades they tend to have no taper that i can see. The XV's, XVIII's look allright though, apart from the very rough finish with the so called Dawg Hamon. My Atrim is many years old though, so he might have improved the finish for all i know.

i used to train german longsword and italian rapier with the MASHS group (a HACA/ARMA affiliate). they had a couple of serious rapier and sabre fencers there. also had steve hicks there who does lots of the manuscript translations. i learned much of the german longsword from him. when they'd do the wrestling portions, i'd wreck everyone with little effort, so i stopped going and just continued with BJJ/MT/MMA.

yeah the machine marks are noticeable on gus' blades, but they handle like greased lightning. i've seen pics of a few blades where the owners did a very slow, careful polish of their atrim blade and it turned out damn nice. i don't have the patience for that. i don't own any blades with a fuller (i prefer types XVIIIa, XVIIIb, XVIIIc, XV, and XVa), and i've never seen an atrim blade with a fuller in person.

Yeah I suppose the wrestling aspect of HEMA is the weakest portion. But then if you were to only learn bjj from a book written in obscure verses with a handful of pictures displaying only parts of the techniques, you wouldnt be to hot at BJJ either. Thats the biggest hurdle to overcome in HEMA, IMO. I have no doubt that a medieval german knight would be a solid wrestler. Wasnt it Talhoffer who said everything in swordsmanship has a base in wrestling, and taught a solid wrestling foundation before even beginning on the sword?

The weapon based stuff seems to translate much easier. longswordsmen tend to do pretty well against people with a background in japanese or chinese swordsmanship.

 I just like swords, and I'm doing my BA in archaeology about them.

Had I know this content area was possible, I would have taken more archeology classes in college :-P