Knife/Blade sharpening

For any novice knife guys out there...
I have seen a couple of threads about knife sharpening on here in the past and thought I would pass on what has worked for me.

I have invested in 3 decent knives for the kitchen recently and kept them in reasonable condition for a couple of months with a diamond butcher's steel but lost that out the box edge that one can shave ones arm hair with.
Looked around for a good set of sharpening stones and came across this wee set from Lansky, can't embed link due to top men but here it is.
http://lansky.com/index.php/products/std-3-stone-system/

Been using it today and I am really impressed with the results considering the cost. Took a good while to grind in a new edge on my fillet knife (using coarsest stone, maybe 5 inch blade) but once I did it was just a case of polishing up with the other two stones and it is back to shaving sharpness. The set up is almost idiot proof but I watched a couple of vids on you tube so I didn't wreck anything. There is a stand one can buy to hold the clamp in place but I just held it in my hand and it worked well.
Anyway check it out if like me you have spent money on expensive knives and neglected to consider how to maintain them.

Dontlistentome - For any novice knife guys out there...
I have seen a couple of threads about knife sharpening on here in the past and thought I would pass on what has worked for me.

I have invested in 3 decent knives for the kitchen recently and kept them in reasonable condition for a couple of months with a diamond butcher's steel but lost that out the box edge that one can shave ones arm hair with.
Looked around for a good set of sharpening stones and came across this wee set from Lansky, can't embed link due to top men but here it is.
http://lansky.com/index.php/products/std-3-stone-system/

Been using it today and I am really impressed with the results considering the cost. Took a good while to grind in a new edge on my fillet knife (using coarsest stone, maybe 5 inch blade) but once I did it was just a case of polishing up with the other two stones and it is back to shaving sharpness. The set up is almost idiot proof but I watched a couple of vids on you tube so I didn't wreck anything. There is a stand one can buy to hold the clamp in place but I just held it in my hand and it worked well.
Anyway check it out if like me you have spent money on expensive knives and neglected to consider how to maintain them.

Those systems work great. I like to use them if I'm changing the angle of an edge or on really hard super steels. Both of those tasks take a lot of strokes and the system keeps me more consistent than I would be on regular stones. 

One thing I do before i start with one of those Lanskey style systems is lay the stones with the guide rods installed next to each other, grinding side down. Now twist or bend the guide rods so that they are all straight and parallel with each other. If one is off it will be working at a slightly different angle than the others and throw the whole process off. 

 

 

 

http://lansky.com/index.php/products/std-3-stone-system/

Herro, knife peepuhr.

It only goes up to 600 grit? I use an 8000 grit stone on my final passes.

RocG -
Dontlistentome - For any novice knife guys out there...
I have seen a couple of threads about knife sharpening on here in the past and thought I would pass on what has worked for me.

I have invested in 3 decent knives for the kitchen recently and kept them in reasonable condition for a couple of months with a diamond butcher's steel but lost that out the box edge that one can shave ones arm hair with.
Looked around for a good set of sharpening stones and came across this wee set from Lansky, can't embed link due to top men but here it is.
http://lansky.com/index.php/products/std-3-stone-system/

Been using it today and I am really impressed with the results considering the cost. Took a good while to grind in a new edge on my fillet knife (using coarsest stone, maybe 5 inch blade) but once I did it was just a case of polishing up with the other two stones and it is back to shaving sharpness. The set up is almost idiot proof but I watched a couple of vids on you tube so I didn't wreck anything. There is a stand one can buy to hold the clamp in place but I just held it in my hand and it worked well.
Anyway check it out if like me you have spent money on expensive knives and neglected to consider how to maintain them.

Those systems work great. I like to use them if I'm changing the angle of an edge or on really hard super steels. Both of those tasks take a lot of strokes and the system keeps me more consistent than I would be on regular stones. 

One thing I do before i start with one of those Lanskey style systems is lay the stones with the guide rods installed next to each other, grinding side down. Now twist or bend the guide rods so that they are all straight and parallel with each other. If one is off it will be working at a slightly different angle than the others and throw the whole process off. 

 

 

 

Yeah one of the videos I watched said that too, I bent the rods trying to get them out of them clips in the case so took a while to line them up. Those bastards were in there tight!
I have a 7 inch chef knife I need to do, but will to work up to that one.

Fathead D - It only goes up to 600 grit? I use an 8000 grit stone on my final passes.
You can get finer ones for it, I just went for a basic set up.

Altofsky - Herro, knife peepuhr.
Oh shit! Go easy on me, I am but a beginner.

Dontlistentome -
RocG -
Dontlistentome - For any novice knife guys out there...
I have seen a couple of threads about knife sharpening on here in the past and thought I would pass on what has worked for me.

I have invested in 3 decent knives for the kitchen recently and kept them in reasonable condition for a couple of months with a diamond butcher's steel but lost that out the box edge that one can shave ones arm hair with.
Looked around for a good set of sharpening stones and came across this wee set from Lansky, can't embed link due to top men but here it is.
http://lansky.com/index.php/products/std-3-stone-system/

Been using it today and I am really impressed with the results considering the cost. Took a good while to grind in a new edge on my fillet knife (using coarsest stone, maybe 5 inch blade) but once I did it was just a case of polishing up with the other two stones and it is back to shaving sharpness. The set up is almost idiot proof but I watched a couple of vids on you tube so I didn't wreck anything. There is a stand one can buy to hold the clamp in place but I just held it in my hand and it worked well.
Anyway check it out if like me you have spent money on expensive knives and neglected to consider how to maintain them.

Those systems work great. I like to use them if I'm changing the angle of an edge or on really hard super steels. Both of those tasks take a lot of strokes and the system keeps me more consistent than I would be on regular stones. 

One thing I do before i start with one of those Lanskey style systems is lay the stones with the guide rods installed next to each other, grinding side down. Now twist or bend the guide rods so that they are all straight and parallel with each other. If one is off it will be working at a slightly different angle than the others and throw the whole process off. 

 

 

 

Yeah one of the videos I watched said that too, I bent the rods trying to get them out of them clips in the case so took a while to line them up. Those bastards were in there tight!
I have a 7 inch chef knife I need to do, but will to work up to that one.

I wished I'd watched that video. I learned it the hard way. 

I find when I sharpen by hand with a stone I start to induce a slight rounding of the edge. That's not a bad thing, but over repeated sharpenings this can become more rounded than I prefer and the lanskey style systems gets me back to a straight edge geometry. 

Rinse, repeat.

 

Fathead D - It only goes up to 600 grit? I use an 8000 grit stone on my final passes.

What task(s) are you using that knife for? Some blades I like to keep a little coarser because it works better. 

I do my chef's knives with coarse then medium dmt stones. Then I strop them. That's just coarse enough to grab a tomato skin and slice it easily. Going finer actually makes the cut take more pressure because the slice cut won't take. 

But in the case of OPs filet knife it might benefit from some finer grit. Still, what he's got should get the job done good enough. 

Do you strop, OP?

 

 

RocG - 
Fathead D - It only goes up to 600 grit? I use an 8000 grit stone on my final passes.

What task(s) are you using that knife for? Some blades I like to keep a little coarser because it works better. 

I do my chef's knives with coarse then medium dmt stones. Then I strop them. That's just coarse enough to grab a tomato skin and slice it easily. Going finer actually makes the cut take more pressure because the slice cut won't take. 

But in the case of OPs filet knife it might benefit from some finer grit. Still, what he's got should get the job done good enough. 

Do you strop, OP?

 

 


Kitchen knife on the 8K stone. I have no issues cutting tomatoes with my knife. You may want to add some horizontal motion to your knife stroke and not only vertical.

Yeah I struggle to keep a consistent angle down the entire edge doing it free hand. I used to be able to when I cut meat for a living but it's a 'use it or lose skill' for me.
I am happy with this system though, hate having good knives with a shitty edge!

RocG -
Fathead D - It only goes up to 600 grit? I use an 8000 grit stone on my final passes.

What task(s) are you using that knife for? Some blades I like to keep a little coarser because it works better. 

I do my chef's knives with coarse then medium dmt stones. Then I strop them. That's just coarse enough to grab a tomato skin and slice it easily. Going finer actually makes the cut take more pressure because the slice cut won't take. 

But in the case of OPs filet knife it might benefit from some finer grit. Still, what he's got should get the job done good enough. 

Do you strop, OP?

 

 

No I don't strop but one of the videos I watched that was the last step the guy used.
This is the video:
https://youtu.be/ZlI5PaXsfOk

Dontlistentome -
Altofsky - Herro, knife peepuhr.
Oh shit! Go easy on me, I am but a beginner.
Oh no no, you'll see I mostly stay out of these discussions except to emphasize the fact that this whole animal is largely personal preference. You can achieve the same end through many avenues.

The quote above was just a line from a popular internet sharpening hound. Check out virtuovice on YouTube. Wako is the man.

Sound, will look him up.
I am a big fan of your work, I am in the UK and have heard shipping can be problematic once customs get a sniff. If I get a nice bonus this year I will be dropping you a line.

What makes a knife left or right handed? Been eyeing up your santoku knives, I like the handle being high up and away from the edge.

Fathead D -
RocG - 
Fathead D - It only goes up to 600 grit? I use an 8000 grit stone on my final passes.

What task(s) are you using that knife for? Some blades I like to keep a little coarser because it works better. 

I do my chef's knives with coarse then medium dmt stones. Then I strop them. That's just coarse enough to grab a tomato skin and slice it easily. Going finer actually makes the cut take more pressure because the slice cut won't take. 

But in the case of OPs filet knife it might benefit from some finer grit. Still, what he's got should get the job done good enough. 

Do you strop, OP?

 

 


Kitchen knife on the 8K stone. I have no issues cutting tomatoes with my knife. You may want to add some horizontal motion to your knife stroke and not only vertical.

The horizontal motion is the slice cut I was talking about. 

You've got what works for you, I think that's awesome. 

Going to the level of fineness you've gone to I'm surprised that you need to slice cut at all. I'd think that you could just push cut. 

I'd guess that the way you are doing it allows you to go longer between sharpenings than my method, which would be a benefit. The cool thing about my method is that it takes so little time and still gives great results in the kitchen. 

There's more than one way to sharpen the knife that skins the cat. 

That's the old saying, right?

 

Fathead, for non-culinary purposes I will sharpen a knife more to the level that you are doing. 

I'm not sure what the grit rating is, but I'll go to an extra-fine DMT stone and then strop with the green honing compound. 

I don't know anyone else that does this, but in addition to normal stropping I like to strop to round out where the primary bevel and the edge bevel meet.

I find it reduces friction when cutting tough materials. Of course the edge won't look as pretty but who gives a fuck about that?

 

 

Altofsky -
Dontlistentome -
Altofsky - Herro, knife peepuhr.
Oh shit! Go easy on me, I am but a beginner.
Oh no no, you'll see I mostly stay out of these discussions except to emphasize the fact that this whole animal is largely personal preference. You can achieve the same end through many avenues.

The quote above was just a line from a popular internet sharpening hound. Check out virtuovice on YouTube. Wako is the man.

There are so many ways to sharpen. (I know you know, altofsky.)

Take your ceramic coffee cup. First, finish your coffee. Then turn it over. Usually the ceramic is unglazed at the bottom. There's a fine level stone right there to tweak your knifes edge.

A water polished stone, a brick, a cement block. You can get an edge on almost anything. 

 

RocG -
Altofsky -
Dontlistentome -
Altofsky - Herro, knife peepuhr.
Oh shit! Go easy on me, I am but a beginner.
Oh no no, you'll see I mostly stay out of these discussions except to emphasize the fact that this whole animal is largely personal preference. You can achieve the same end through many avenues.

The quote above was just a line from a popular internet sharpening hound. Check out virtuovice on YouTube. Wako is the man.

There are so many ways to sharpen. (I know you know, altofsky.)

Take your ceramic coffee cup. First, finish your coffee. Then turn it over. Usually the ceramic is unglazed at the bottom. There's a fine level stone right there to tweak your knifes edge.

A water polished stone, a brick, a cement block. You can get an edge on almost anything. 

 

I freely admit that I'm a car-window guy lol.

I know you've got some experience sharpening super hard steels. You ever try CruForgeV? It's like S30VN in that it laughs off abrasives. I don't even handsand that shit beyond 220.

Altofsky -
RocG -
Altofsky -
Dontlistentome -
Altofsky - Herro, knife peepuhr.
Oh shit! Go easy on me, I am but a beginner.
Oh no no, you'll see I mostly stay out of these discussions except to emphasize the fact that this whole animal is largely personal preference. You can achieve the same end through many avenues.

The quote above was just a line from a popular internet sharpening hound. Check out virtuovice on YouTube. Wako is the man.

There are so many ways to sharpen. (I know you know, altofsky.)

Take your ceramic coffee cup. First, finish your coffee. Then turn it over. Usually the ceramic is unglazed at the bottom. There's a fine level stone right there to tweak your knifes edge.

A water polished stone, a brick, a cement block. You can get an edge on almost anything. 

 

I freely admit that I'm a car-window guy lol.

I know you've got some experience sharpening super hard steels. You ever try CruForgeV? It's like S30VN in that it laughs off abrasives. I don't even handsand that shit beyond 220.

I haven't tried it. I have a spiderco with zdp-189. I used a lanskey system to sharpen it. It was holy shit sharp and kept that edge for longer than any knife that I EDC'd. 

And I put the the narrowest angle on it the system would do. That steel is so tough.

That's actually the only super steel knife I own. I've though about getting something in S30VN. But for some reason I keep buying hand forged fixed blades...