Lifting for weight loss

Tips an tricks Phone Post 3.0

Step 1) Lift.

Step 2) Lift something heavier.

Repeat. Phone Post 3.0

I love the og Phone Post 3.0

Lift heavy take short breaks keep the heart rate up sweat balls Phone Post 3.0

Always lift and hold something heavy before weighing yourself...


When you weigh yourself in the morning you'll have lost a significant amount. Phone Post 3.0

Farmers Walk with heavy weights Phone Post 3.0

High rep low weight. Now I don't mean be a bitch and curl 5lb weights, but just make the weight a challenge and lift it a bunch of times. When that gets easy increase the weight. Phone Post 3.0

Weight loss is all diet. Exercise is great but it will only slow you down. I'm aware that goes against collective folk wisdom but the science is pretty solid:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x7FK8noIc5I&feature=youtu.be

is this for real?

When I try to drop some weight I keep it simple fasted cardio in the morning keto or low carb diet and compound movements in the gym.

Drink plenty water and get plenty sleep track your calories with an app if you want. Phone Post 3.0

Lift while in Ketosis Phone Post 3.0

I have been dealing with how calorie deficits and exercise work with weight loss for many years. I can tell you this.

The ONLY thing that caused me to lose weight with exercise is running/jogging at about an 8 min pace and then doing fun-runs every other weekend at about a 7 - 7.5 min/mile pace. For training I was running a rolling hills course of about four tough miles four times a week consistently.

Weight lifting, bike riding up hills, powerlifting NONE of those things resulted in a weight loss beyond the initial oh, 10lbs when you start something new and then it slowly comes back, sometimes as fat, sometimes as mostly muscle.

One large apple has about 100 calories. If you eat at maintenance for a year but you add an apple, that means over 52 weeks you are going to gain about a pound and a half each and every year. At 10 years, you have ON PAPER, a chance to gain 15 pounds. Just by eating about 100 calories over maintenance. That's why they say that aging results in about a 1-2% gain in fat/body weight if you do nothing different, mostly. Yes the metabolism might slow a little.

If you figure out a way to consistently have a caloric deficit (and that has to take into account mistakes and the inevitable gain with age) you can lose weight at the rate of 1.0 to 1.15 lbs a week, without feeling deprived.

BUT this is hard, because it's boring, change is so slow you can hardly tell and it's easy to make a mistake and wipe out the loss of fat.

TO me the only way to lose weight involves a systematic method that works for you over a LONG period of time (like 8-12 months for every 50-60lbs), and stays around the 1.25 to 1.5lbs per week mark.

This is hard because you have to weigh and track and keep at it and not cheat, but it can be done and yes not feel deprived. It's really easy to be sabotaged or self-sabotage.

One thing people don't realize and that it is GOOD that it is hard to lose fat/weight, and that is because it means the human body uses calories very well (except for the big brain which is a calorie burner for the species), and it has a good mechanism for keeping things stable (homeostasis). So while good for survival it makes it tough because Eating is a drive, like thirst and breathing and sex and stuff. It's very hard to overcome a drive.

So basically be prepared to do a lot of calorie burning such that it's kind of hard to eat enough to not lose weight. For me about 20 hard miles per week, each and every week uphills and at speeds around 7 min/mile and the feeling of not wanting to eat for several hours after that and the post exercise burn which lasted I think about another hour after stopping for me, is what it takes. You're not going to do it at the gym doing a few sets even lifting very heavy. Look at big powerlifters. They're fat.

 

BarkLikeADog - Weight loss is all diet. Exercise is great but it will only slow you down. I'm aware that goes against collective folk wisdom but the science is pretty solid:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x7FK8noIc5I&feature=youtu.be
Shit I wanted to be "in before Barklikeadog"... Phone Post 3.0

Butterbeans Low Kicks -
BarkLikeADog - Weight loss is all diet. Exercise is great but it will only slow you down. I'm aware that goes against collective folk wisdom but the science is pretty solid:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x7FK8noIc5I&feature=youtu.be
Shit I wanted to be "in before Barklikeadog"... Phone Post 3.0
And did you copypaste this post from an other thread you lazy bastard ? Haha Phone Post 3.0

Losing weight is primarily about one thing - caloric deficit.

i.e. - burning up more calories than you take on a consistent, daily basis

This occurs by A) eating less, B) burning more calories during the day, or C) a combination of the two.

The VERY best (and most effective) thing you can do if you want to lose weight is figure out how to eat less on that consistent, daily basis. Find the EASIEST and SIMPLEST way to do this, even if the method you choose is (supposedly) "less effective".

CONSISTENCY is your key here. Whatever allows you to most easily eat fewer calories day in & day out for the long-term is going to be best. This is why I almost always recommend intermittent fasting. Not eating during the day is rather easy to acclimate to & getting to eat a large, satisfying, & satiating meal at the end of the day while still eating fewer overall calories for the day has one of the greatest chances that you'll stick to it, considering that most people break "diets" because they're hungry.

Regardless, whatever type of eating plan will have you taking in fewer calories and you're most likely to stick to...do that.

As for lifting - you'll want to be strength training. None of this low-weight, high rep bullshit. You'll be having your body feast on itself for the calories it needs (but isn't getting via food). Muscle is broken down more easily & quickly than fat is, so strength training will preserve muscle while in a caloric deficit.

You can start off with basic upper / lower split. Have two upper body days - one each dedicated to horizontal pushing & vertical pushing as main movements, with assistance after that. Then two lower days - one each to Squatting & Deadlifting with assistance after that.

(Or for lower days you can do Trap Bar Deadlifts in place of both Squats & Deadlifts. I went into this & how in the Trap Bar DLing thread.)

Acclimate your body to continue to doing strength training while on a caloric deficit.

Once you've acclimated to that, you can extra activity simply be adding "active rest" to your workout in the simple form of doing 50 Jumping Jacks, Seal Jacks, or Skiers (like a Jumping Jack only your arms & legs scissor like x-country skiing) after every single set of every exercise.

Sounds simply & easy, but by the end of your workout, you'll have done likely into the thousands of Jacks/Skiers. It adds up.

Once you acclimate to that, you can add a power-endurance type of exercise (think Burpees, various Jumps, Squat Thrusts, Mountain Climbers, etc) between your strength exercise & Active Rest.

Supplement all this with just plain walking. Add a weight vest to increase difficulty. Start with 3-4 cumulative hours per week (doesn't matter when you do it). This will burn a few extra calories as well as improve your basic heart health. Build up to 45-60 mins per day if time allots. If not, make it more difficult by wearing a weight vest.

Combine these elements on a consistent day-in & day-out basis & you'll find your body composition changing more quickly than you think...not to mention your overall physical abilities (strength, cardio, etc.)

WidespreadPanic -


I have been dealing with how calorie deficits and exercise work with weight loss for many years. I can tell you this.



The ONLY thing that caused me to lose weight with exercise is running/jogging at about an 8 min pace and then doing fun-runs every other weekend at about a 7 - 7.5 min/mile pace. For training I was running a rolling hills course of about four tough miles four times a week consistently.



Weight lifting, bike riding up hills, powerlifting NONE of those things resulted in a weight loss beyond the initial oh, 10lbs when you start something new and then it slowly comes back, sometimes as fat, sometimes as mostly muscle.



One large apple has about 100 calories. If you eat at maintenance for a year but you add an apple, that means over 52 weeks you are going to gain about a pound and a half each and every year. At 10 years, you have ON PAPER, a chance to gain 15 pounds. Just by eating about 100 calories over maintenance. That's why they say that aging results in about a 1-2% gain in fat/body weight if you do nothing different, mostly. Yes the metabolism might slow a little.



If you figure out a way to consistently have a caloric deficit (and that has to take into account mistakes and the inevitable gain with age) you can lose weight at the rate of 1.0 to 1.15 lbs a week, without feeling deprived.



BUT this is hard, because it's boring, change is so slow you can hardly tell and it's easy to make a mistake and wipe out the loss of fat.



TO me the only way to lose weight involves a systematic method that works for you over a LONG period of time (like 8-12 months for every 50-60lbs), and stays around the 1.25 to 1.5lbs per week mark.



This is hard because you have to weigh and track and keep at it and not cheat, but it can be done and yes not feel deprived. It's really easy to be sabotaged or self-sabotage.



One thing people don't realize and that it is GOOD that it is hard to lose fat/weight, and that is because it means the human body uses calories very well (except for the big brain which is a calorie burner for the species), and it has a good mechanism for keeping things stable (homeostasis). So while good for survival it makes it tough because Eating is a drive, like thirst and breathing and sex and stuff. It's very hard to overcome a drive.



So basically be prepared to do a lot of calorie burning such that it's kind of hard to eat enough to not lose weight. For me about 20 hard miles per week, each and every week uphills and at speeds around 7 min/mile and the feeling of not wanting to eat for several hours after that and the post exercise burn which lasted I think about another hour after stopping for me, is what it takes. You're not going to do it at the gym doing a few sets even lifting very heavy. Look at big powerlifters. They're fat.



 

Good post ty Phone Post 3.0

Jeez...there are all kinds of typos in my post. I'm tired & still not full awake yet...don't feel like editing. Don't judge. lol

So it's not just about losing weight is it? We're talking burning fat. So really you want to hold on to as much muscle as possible whilst burning fat. To do that you need a good base. As someone else said early on in the thread, muscle burns calories. You want to start losing your weight on the most calories possible. A lot of people find themselves on 1000 calories early on and then there's nowhere to go.

Personally I would recommend getting stronger first and build up a good capacity for work. As you start to progress into your fat loss you want to be kicking off with a small deficit from diet and then slowly readjust as you go.

I would continue training for hypertrophy whilst in deficit. I read once that the best way to maintain muscle is to use the same methods you would to build it. The only difference is diet.

So for me:

Adaptive phase:
Work capacity
Muscle

Fat loss:
Diet
HIIT (I would do one session a week to start alongside weight training)

I'm making a lot of assumptions here as I don't know your training history. I'm treating it as if you're just starting out. Phone Post 3.0

Essentially lift heavy and eat less, but good luck with that.  Lifting makes me want to devour a horse so I havent figured out the secret bro. GL. 

"And did you copypaste this post from an other thread you lazy bastard ?"

The nerve of people replicating information for replicated questions! How dumb.