Looking to buy a boat-TME

Never owned a boat before so I’m looking for something older and at a lower price point. No chance I’m going to go shell out $25 to $30k for a new one. 

Would be a lake boat used to pull someone on a tube or do some fishing at other times. 

If I go look at one from a private buyer, what do I look out for? Holes, cover ups, dead bodies? 

I have a good idea what to check out and keep an eye on for a vehicle, but a boat is a different world for me where I’m lost. 

Hoping to find that first of the only two good days of owning a boat soon!

appreciate any help or advice anyone here could pass along. 

What lakes will you frequent? Mostly for pulling a tube and pleasure use with just a little fishing, or closer to 50/50 duty?

How mechanically inclined are you?

Also, lol @ $30K for a new boat! Are you looking at aluminum jon boats with 40hp outboards?

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Such a broad topic. What size and type of boat are you considering? I/O tends to run cheaper than outboard, because the outboard itself is incredibly expensive. Avoid boats that have seen salt water if you can. I avoid boats with bottom paint. I also avoid boats that weren't stored with cockpit covers, or were stored long term. 

You know what they say about owning a boat. The two best days of boat ownership are the day you get your boat, and the day you sell it 

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If it floats flies it fucks rent it

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sicko -

You know what they say about owning a boat. The two best days of boat ownership are the day you get your boat, and the day you sell it 

Outside of that being completely worn out he already said that in the OP 

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sicko -

You know what they say about owning a boat. The two best days of boat ownership are the day you get your boat, and the day you sell it 

 I was just a random OGer who heard this line like you, many many times in threads here over the years.  

Then one year, I had the same thought as you did.  exact same. So I dropped 13,000. and got a nice, fun little speed boat. A Chapperalle. (sp?)

We rented a doc space on the lake 250. for the year.  Then we bought toys. Spent 500. on various ropes, skiis, tubes, jackets, etc.

I also had to buy a new cover. I got  custom fit one.  1500.00

Then we went hard.  For about a month.  After that, no one really wanted to go out any more.  I'd have to beg people to come use it. On month 3 it was just sitting there. No friends wanted a lake day, my kids didn't want a lake day.  I told my kids, use it or loose it.  It sat there for a whole month, not used once.  

I put an add on craigslist. Ended up selling it for a loss. 12,000.

So I ended up renting a boat for 3500. basically.  

I was happy to see it go.  

You have been warned! lol 

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The used boat market is tough right now. With Covid cancelling so many vacations it seems a lot of those funds are being directed to boats. Be patient when shopping

Before you buy a boat make sure you have a full understanding of costs. Registration, taxes, insurance, annual maintenance, storage, towing, etc. Can your current vehicle haul the boat? Will you pay for a slip or keep at your house? Storing a boat somewhere can be $60/month or $300/month. Adds up. How far are you from a landing? If it's an hour away will you actually use the boat enough? 

Most unhappy boat owners stem from people who only looked at the cost of the boat and not everything else. Then they're out thousands more than they expected and use the boat 1/2 dozen times a year, way less than they expected. 

Once you've answered those questions and you still want a boat then you can start boat shopping. Find your budget for the boat and start searching from there. Go look in person. A lot of options. Bow riders, wake board boats, deck boats, bass boats, etc. How many people on average will be with you? 

BOAT=Break Out Another Thousand.

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Jed - BOAT=Break Out Another Thousand.

Damn, that's hilarious. Did you make that up?

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#skaternation

Another option is a boat club. Since you've never owned a boat can do that one summer. See how much you'll actually use. If you feel it's worth the investment. If so, buy one next year. If not, you saved yourself a lot of time and money

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With your first boat you learn a lot of things the hard (and probably expensive) way.

We bought an old Rinker cuddy cabin for $3,500 and I easily had that much in it for various thing that could have been at least mostly avoided if I’d known what the hell i was doing.

It was fun, though. Hopefully your wife/gf has hot friends or you have the prospect of hot chicks being aboard. Being confined to a small space with girls wearing less than would be considered underwear climbing in and out soaking wet all day doesn’t suck.

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Fan of Fanboys -

The used boat market is tough right now. With Covid cancelling so many vacations it seems a lot of those funds are being directed to boats. Be patient when shopping

Before you buy a boat make sure you have a full understanding of costs. Registration, taxes, insurance, annual maintenance, storage, towing, etc. Can your current vehicle haul the boat? Will you pay for a slip or keep at your house? Storing a boat somewhere can be $60/month or $300/month. Adds up. How far are you from a landing? If it's an hour away will you actually use the boat enough? 

Most unhappy boat owners stem from people who only looked at the cost of the boat and not everything else. Then they're out thousands more than they expected and use the boat 1/2 dozen times a year, way less than they expected. 

Once you've answered those questions and you still want a boat then you can start boat shopping. Find your budget for the boat and start searching from there. Go look in person. A lot of options. Bow riders, wake board boats, deck boats, bass boats, etc. How many people on average will be with you? 

Appreciate this, and all others. I am only about 20 minutes from a lake. My dad lives on one as well. I have the room at my house to store. 

Fishing/fun split would probably be a 50/50 split with it mostly being my wife and I. 

If I find one I am interested in, what do I look at when I go see it in person? 

Outside of cracks in fiberglass, what things do I need to look at?

Thank you all. 

If you don't want a straight inboard ski boat like a Mastercraft/Ski-Natique (which would kind of suck for fishing) any used 18-22 foot bass boat with 115+ motor would do the job. One note, if you start getting into the big outboards 200+ hp they burn the fuck out of fuel and you can spend a lot of money ski-ing for 8 hours.

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The Earl of Elm Mott -
Fan of Fanboys -

The used boat market is tough right now. With Covid cancelling so many vacations it seems a lot of those funds are being directed to boats. Be patient when shopping

Before you buy a boat make sure you have a full understanding of costs. Registration, taxes, insurance, annual maintenance, storage, towing, etc. Can your current vehicle haul the boat? Will you pay for a slip or keep at your house? Storing a boat somewhere can be $60/month or $300/month. Adds up. How far are you from a landing? If it's an hour away will you actually use the boat enough? 

Most unhappy boat owners stem from people who only looked at the cost of the boat and not everything else. Then they're out thousands more than they expected and use the boat 1/2 dozen times a year, way less than they expected. 

Once you've answered those questions and you still want a boat then you can start boat shopping. Find your budget for the boat and start searching from there. Go look in person. A lot of options. Bow riders, wake board boats, deck boats, bass boats, etc. How many people on average will be with you? 

Appreciate this, and all others. I am only about 20 minutes from a lake. My dad lives on one as well. I have the room at my house to store. 

Fishing/fun split would probably be a 50/50 split with it mostly being my wife and I. 

If I find one I am interested in, what do I look at when I go see it in person? 

Outside of cracks in fiberglass, what things do I need to look at?

Thank you all. 

Outboards/Engines are really important. Most other stuff can be reasonably fixed (Fiberglass, electrical). If you buy a boat with a shit engine you are in trouble. A new 150 is over 10 grand. When you go to buy a boat it is worth it to have a mechanic go through the motor.

1 Like
The Earl of Elm Mott -
Fan of Fanboys -

The used boat market is tough right now. With Covid cancelling so many vacations it seems a lot of those funds are being directed to boats. Be patient when shopping

Before you buy a boat make sure you have a full understanding of costs. Registration, taxes, insurance, annual maintenance, storage, towing, etc. Can your current vehicle haul the boat? Will you pay for a slip or keep at your house? Storing a boat somewhere can be $60/month or $300/month. Adds up. How far are you from a landing? If it's an hour away will you actually use the boat enough? 

Most unhappy boat owners stem from people who only looked at the cost of the boat and not everything else. Then they're out thousands more than they expected and use the boat 1/2 dozen times a year, way less than they expected. 

Once you've answered those questions and you still want a boat then you can start boat shopping. Find your budget for the boat and start searching from there. Go look in person. A lot of options. Bow riders, wake board boats, deck boats, bass boats, etc. How many people on average will be with you? 

Appreciate this, and all others. I am only about 20 minutes from a lake. My dad lives on one as well. I have the room at my house to store. 

Fishing/fun split would probably be a 50/50 split with it mostly being my wife and I. 

If I find one I am interested in, what do I look at when I go see it in person? 

Outside of cracks in fiberglass, what things do I need to look at?

Thank you all. 

Make sure the motor runs well, the charging system works, it shifts into and out of gear freely, and look for rotten or wet stringers and transom.

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Never ending expense

Ok, go stand under a cold shower, and tear up $10,000 notes above your head.  That’s the closest feeling you can get of boat ownership.

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The 2 happiest days in a boaters life are when they buy one and when they sell it. 

If youve never boated in your life go take a boaters safety course. Preferably one hosted by the coast guard. 

Dont buy your first boat through someone selling privately. Your going to pay more buying through a broker or a marina but they normally do a far superior job of making sure the boat isnt going to sink the moment you get it in the water.

Once youve bought one. Practice launching and recovering the boat. Dont be that guy holding everyone else up at the boat ramp because ypu had to walk back and grab your phone, lunch, etc.

Last but not least..........

Dont forget the boat plug. What ever you do make sure the plug is in before launching the boat. 

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