Maryland police going door to door.

https://www.wusa9.com/amp/article/news/health/coronavirus/coronavirus-maryland-stay-at-home-police-orders/65-06e76484-553c-4a7c-8cdc-b759eeb1e1ac


"Since March 24, MSP has conducted over 21,617 compliance checks and responded to roughly 1,720 calls concerned about people violating Gov. Larry Hogan's coronavirus executive orders.

Of the 21,617 compliance checks, 35 people have been arrested and charged in the state, MSP wrote in a statement."

Meanwhile, just 3 days ago,,,

The chief judge of Maryland’s highest court has directed judges throughout the state to identify inmates who are at increased risk of dying if they contract coronavirus, and to consider whether the inmate’s release would jeopardize public safety.

And Montgomery County’s top prosecutor said it’s a great idea.

In a six-page administrative order, Court of Appeals Chief Judge Mary Ellen Barbera said “an emergency exists that poses a threat of imminent and potentially lethal harm” to people who contract the novel coronavirus.

“The incarcerated and imprisoned populations of Maryland include individuals who, because of age or underlying medical conditions, are at a heightened risk of severe or fatal outcomes if they contract COVID-19,” wrote Barbera.

Barbera’s order instructs attorneys, prosecutors and judges to “identify at-risk incarcerated persons for potential release to protect the health of at-risk incarcerated persons during the COVID-19 pandemic crisis.”

Montgomery County State’s Attorney John McCarthy told WTOP he believes Barbera’s order strikes the right balance of providing public health and public safety.

“It allows us, without just setting categories of individuals that are released, to look at every case individually,” said McCarthy.

As for challenges, McCarthy said his county has been able to find extra electronic monitoring devices, “which are in short supply right now.”

“When people are victims of crimes, we have obligations to notify them if there’s going to be a change in the status of an individual,” said McCarthy. “That’s taking a little bit longer.”

The order directs judges to schedule hearings for the next business day in several instances, and said bond hearings should be expedited for defendants charged with nonviolent crimes.

Judges are being told to determine whether facilities holding at-risk inmates are capable of addressing medical issues.

In pretrial cases, judges should consider whether the defendant poses a public safety risk to an identifiable victim, and “whether there exists a condition or combination of conditions of pretrial release that can reasonably protect against such danger.”

McCarthy said that practice is already being followed in Montgomery County. “The vast majority of individuals, particularly for low-level nuisance or nonviolent crimes, are not held in jail,” he said.

https://wtop.com/coronavirus/2020/04/coronavirus-md-courts-ordered-to-id-at-risk-inmates-for-potential-release/

Shocked I telll ya.  Shocked.

Is this real life?  As a cop I find this appalling.  I would 100% refuse to participate in this or anything similar.  The most quarantine enforcement I do now is call out my car's PA as I drive by and tell people a park is closed.  I don't even make sure they leave.  

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buddie - 

Is this real life?  As a cop I find this appalling.  I would 100% refuse to participate in this or anything similar.  The most quarantine enforcement I do now is call out my car's PA as I drive by and tell people a park is closed.  I don't even make sure they leave.  


you sir are a good man!

buddie - 

Is this real life?  As a cop I find this appalling.  I would 100% refuse to participate in this or anything similar.  The most quarantine enforcement I do now is call out my car's PA as I drive by and tell people a park is closed.  I don't even make sure they leave.  


A good friend of mine is a cop.

He will accompany other cops who follow these types of orders primarily to ensure that nothing gets out of hand.

You sound like him.

chad_mcjangle - this is what's called anarcho-tyranny although I mostly support the lockdowns lol. Criminals are let out of jail while normal people are arrested for non-crimes.

This is what's called retardation.  Seriously, they are letting criminals out of jail then turning around and arresting people for surfing.....in the middle of the fucking ocean....far away from other people.....  

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Where in that article does it say anything about door-to-door? 

Isnt going to door to door a great way to spread shit.

2 Likes

Will the ACLU challenge this?

FreightTrain -
buddie - 

Is this real life?  As a cop I find this appalling.  I would 100% refuse to participate in this or anything similar.  The most quarantine enforcement I do now is call out my car's PA as I drive by and tell people a park is closed.  I don't even make sure they leave.  


A good friend of mine is a cop.

He will accompany other cops who follow these types of orders primarily to ensure that nothing gets out of hand.

You sound like him.

I believe my primary duty and moral obligation is to protect and defend the rights of people not to infringe on them. I am outraged by a lot of the stories I have been reading from around the country of civil rights being suspended.  Those rights are supposed to be inalienable.  We all swore to uphold and defend the constitution.  The vast majority of the police I know feel the same.  

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I'm skeptical that the "vast majority" of police operate with some kind of underlying constitutional morality that drives them.

I think history tells us that police will do exactly what the state tells them with few exceptions.

supersonic - I'm skeptical that the "vast majority" of police operate with some kind of underlying constitutional morality that drives them.

I think history tells us that police will do exactly what the state tells them with few exceptions.

Meh we only really hear the exceptions because they make good news stories. 

Fear mongering propaganda 

Jayn200 - 
supersonic - I'm skeptical that the "vast majority" of police operate with some kind of underlying constitutional morality that drives them.

I think history tells us that police will do exactly what the state tells them with few exceptions.

Meh we only really hear the exceptions because they make good news stories. 


Actually, the public only knows about very few of those incidents because the cops control the information and the narrative and will usually not release it.


But with the proliferation of cellphone cameras and security cams everywhere, we're starting to see a lot more of them. 

supersonic - I'm skeptical that the "vast majority" of police operate with some kind of underlying constitutional morality that drives them.

I think history tells us that police will do exactly what the state tells them with few exceptions.

I didn't say that the vast majority of cops think anything.  I can only speak to my personal experience.  I said the vast majority of cops I know feel that way. I have no idea what the majority of cops  think and, by the way, neither do you.