MH370 Secretly Landed In Kazakhstan ?

Jeff Wise, who is also CNN’s aviation analyst, said there may have been “deliberate tampering” in the search data to make the Boeing 777 appear to have gone in another direction.

Wise earlier wrote an article for the New York Magazine suggesting that its navigational data had been meddled with, to leave trails of inaccurate information which convinced officials that the plane flew south.

He also said the plane was possibly hijacked by perpetrators, who could have accessed the flight controls and flew the plane to Baikonur Cosmodrome, which is leased from Kazakhstan by Russia.

Wise said his theory was established upon satellite transmissions and “pings” that the plane fed off seven hours after it was missing. Those transmissions were recorded by British company Inmarsat, whose raw data was then released by Malaysian officials in late May 2014.

In the article, however, Wise said he wasn’t sure of why Russian President Vladimir Putin wanted the Malaysian passenger plane.

“There’s no way to know. That’s the thing about MH370 theory-making: It’s hard to come up with a plausible motive for an act that has no apparent beneficiaries,” he said.

He added that there were three Russians on board of MH370, one of whom was a first-class passenger seated near equipment, where he could alter the navigation data and take over the flight.

“He ran a lumber company in Irkutsk, and his hobby was technical diving under the ice of Lake Baikal,” Wise said, indicating that that particular passenger could have possessed the necessary skill sets to execute the sophisticated hijack.

MH370 disappeared from radar on March 8, 2014 en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. The Boeing 777 carrying 239 people last made contact with air traffic control less than an hour after take-off, at a point over the South China Sea.

The flight was declared officially missing on January 29, and all passengers and crew members are presumed dead. No trace of the plane has been found despite the largest search operation in aviation history. – February 25, 2015.

http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/malaysia/article/mh370-secretly-landed-in-kazakhstan-says-american-author#sthash.SUvSrUqa.dpuf

The hacker "Jester" posted that and has been saying for a long long time the plane landed in eastern Iran which is roughly 200 miles from where this guy says it landed.

Wouldn't it have shown up on either Chinese or Indian radar?

Would have had to fly over either to get to Kazakhstan Phone Post 3.0

Here's where it gets interesting. Keep in mind this is from Jesters site posted in October. He's pointing out this article he posted back then as it plays into all of this. I'll post the link below but I'm going to post a little of the article.



3 weeks ago Libya’s Tripoli International Airport came under siege from jihadis, and where there are jihadis in Libya there’s a Mokhtar Belmokhtar. The terrorists pretty much destroyed the entire airport including 34 jetliners, took command of the battlespace, and raised their little black flag. But not all the aircraft were destroyed. ELEVEN jetliners are now ‘missing’. That’s right ‘missing’, not burned out shells left in situ, ‘missing’. (SOURCE) It’s almost as if that’s what they went there for in the first place. Let’s remember that passenger jets have been used as weapons of choice by both jihadis and Libyans (Lockerbie) effectively in the past.

Well, it so happens that just before terrorists seized Libya’s Tripoli International Airport and made off with ELEVEN freaking planes. Our Commander in Chief lifted the ban on Libyans attending US flight schools and training in Nuclear Studies. The ban had been in place for 31 years, since 1983. (SOURCE) Quote: The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s recent directive reports, “The United States Government and the Government of Libya have normalized their relationship, and most of the restrictions and sanctions imposed by the United States and the United Nations toward Libya have been lifted.”

Note: It’s not like any terrorists need to finish flight school, they just need to know how to get the aircraft up and on target.

A lot has changed since 9/11 2001. New protocols regarding the shooting down of civilian populated areas by military fighters, increased airport security, and a multitude of other measures and counter-measures. But if a plane is inbound and about to slam into a western target on the ground we’d know well in advance right? Well, as we saw with MH370 it is possible to completely lose a passenger jet and 250 souls onboard even in the 21st century.

From JUNE this year: “As many as 13 planes flying over Europe vanish from radar screens in an “unprecedented” series of blackouts that lasted 25 minutes. An air-safety investigation has been launched after 13 planes flying over Europe disappeared from radar screens in two “unprecedented” blackouts” – Dry run or systems failure? Either way, planes disappeared and we still don’t know what



http://www.jesterscourt.cc/2014/09/04/911-while-were-never-forgetting-are-we-forgetting-something/


To summarize, he feels a large amount of passenger jets have been stolen by terrorist in an effort to pull off another 9/11 type attack. He also claim there is some type of way transponders can be manipulated to show aircraft on radar(if at all) in a completely different location than where they actually are.



I know a few people that post here can speak in detail about aviation tracking/radar/ and transponders. I would love to hear what they think about this and if it's truly plausible?

I can only speak to military radar, not civilian, and definitely not to civilian aviation policy.

First, I would say that the entire world is not bathed in radar waves, and every radar system in the world isn't necessarily always actively scanning, or being monitored.

With that said, it's definitely possible to lose a track, and even more possible than that the plane wasn't on a monitored radar screen between Malaysia and Iran/Kazakhstan. I mean, you're not flying over the most technologically developed portion of the world.

Now this would definitely require some planning and knowledge, so you don't inadvertently fly through a well-monitored air space corridor or volume. I would imagine that the average airline pilot knows his volumes and corridors well-enough to make this possible.

"I mean, you're not flying over the most technologically developed portion of the world."

Heavily militarised though. Like I said, to get to Kazakhstan, it's over India, who has been at war with Pakistan and China in the last 40 years... Or china, or Pakistan, or over the Arabian Sea, where the US has lots of ships.

I'm not an expert , just seems difficult... Phone Post 3.0

I tend to agree with you Pratty but the question I would like to know "is it possible to make transponders show your location somewhere other than where you actually are"? If so then this thing is very believable.

Heading towards, and maybe landing @, Kazakhstan was one of the first things I heard when this was happening.

IN. Phone Post 3.0

Maybe for someone looking for that plane... But wouldn't there still be a blip on a screen?

Where is Naderhood when you need him...? Phone Post 3.0

In Phone Post 3.0

Hired Gun - To summarize, he feels a large amount of passenger jets have been stolen by terrorist in an effort to pull off another 9/11 type attack. He also claim there is some type of way transponders can be manipulated to show aircraft on radar(if at all) in a completely different location than where they actually are.



I know a few people that post here can speak in detail about aviation tracking/radar/ and transponders. I would love to hear what they think about this and if it's truly plausible?


Wouldn't that be a silly and convoluted way of going about things?



If you're a serious terrorist entity (ISIS, AQ) than you could simply afford to purchase a used airliner or two through legitimate means, therefore minimizing suspicion before your attack. That, as opposed to acquiring a jet this way and having the spy agency of every nation in the world focused on finding it, and you.

I agree that it would be a stretch I'd still like to know about transponders and if they can be changed?

I'm not sure I'm following.

Even if the plane was steered of course and landed somewhere else. Russian cosmodrome is probably one of the best guarded places on earth?

Interesting. I remember the Lybian airliners disappearing. There is no way that someone simply wanted one in their backyard. Something is up for sure.

While his theory is technically possible, it seems to rely on increasingly improbably assumptions and would be an extremely sophisticated way to steal an airliner. It would require a major intelligence agency to pull it off, like the FSB.

He's basically placing all his eggs in that basket based on the mistaken assumption pretty much everyone had, including the experts, that the sat comm system was in continuous contact. It was revealed that it went down when the rest of the system went dark, but then was re-activated. That's an awfully big jump to make on that one point of data.

TryhardNobody - Transponders operate in different modes (sometimes multiple modes simultaneously). The most common mode, mode A, is a four-digit code that identifies the flight. If the pilot had dialed in someone else's four-digit transponder code, the aircraft would have appeared on the controller's radar as a different flight.

But it wouldn't have appeard (normally) in a different location. They separate flights, so if all of a sudden Flight 370 was gone and a code corresponding to flight 400 was where 370 should be, it would be noticed quickly.

 

He ran a lumber company in Irkutsk, and his hobby was technical diving under the ice of Lake Baikal,” Wise said, indicating that that particular passenger could have possessed the necessary skill sets to execute the sophisticated hijack.


Wait.....what? Phone Post 3.0

TryhardNobody -
pfsjkd - 
TryhardNobody - Transponders operate in different modes (sometimes multiple modes simultaneously). The most common mode, mode A, is a four-digit code that identifies the flight. If the pilot had dialed in someone else's four-digit transponder code, the aircraft would have appeared on the controller's radar as a different flight.
    <p>
        <span class="User-127473" id="userPost52627823">But it wouldn't have appeard (normally) in a different <em>location</em>. They separate flights, so if all of a sudden Flight 370 was gone and a code corresponding to flight 400 was where 370 should be, it would be noticed quickly.</span></p>
    <p>
        <span class="User-127473" id="userPost52627823">&nbsp;</span></p>
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Could they have it cross paths with a drone over the ocean and switch codes then send the drone in a different direction and crash it into the ocean? Or am i misunderstanding what youre saying?</blockquote>

Techically, yes. But I don't know of a drone that flies at the speeds airliners cruise at (they're pretty much all designed to loiter for long periods, which tends to limit their top speed). So unless there is a secret super fast drone, the speed difference would be an anomaly. Phone Post 3.0