Most Distant Galaxy In The Universe Discovered

Al Cappucino - 
Jack Carter - 
unclephilly - 30 Billion miles away.

Go ahead. Wish on that star. Chances are it died off long ago. Just like your dreams.


30 billion miles away would make it the closest star to us ;)


You should delete this post

We've already sent things over a billion. We just got a photo of Earth from almost a billion:

http://mashable.com/2013/07/22/earth-saturn-nasa-cassini/

Lukinho - 
Jack Carter -
unclephilly - 30 Billion miles away.

Go ahead. Wish on that star. Chances are it died off long ago. Just like your dreams.


30 billion miles away would make it the closest star to us ;)

Pretty sure the sun is a star, brah. And so are you. Phone Post 3.0


OK, it's the 3rd closest star to us!

FastAndBulbous - 
Al Cappucino - 
Jack Carter - 
unclephilly - 30 Billion miles away.

Go ahead. Wish on that star. Chances are it died off long ago. Just like your dreams.


30 billion miles away would make it the closest star to us ;)


You should delete this post

We've already sent things over a billion. We just got a photo of Earth from almost a billion:

http://mashable.com/2013/07/22/earth-saturn-nasa-cassini/

baby-silverback - 

Quick question....if it's the most distant, what's all that shit behind it..? Phone Post



Everything else is closer to us; it's just that their varying brightness makes some of them appear to be further away than they really are. It's an optical illusion.



 



A candle in front of your face will appear brighter than the bon fire on the other end of the beach. The problem with huge distances is that we have no visually inherent way of seeing the actual energy output of a star or galaxy to gague it's actual size and distance.

Love this stuff Phone Post

Jack Carter -
baby-silverback -  Quick question....if it's the most distant, what's all that shit behind it..? Phone Post

Everything else is closer to us; it's just that their varying brightness makes some of them appear to be further away than they really are. It's an optical illusion.

 

A candle in front of your face will appear brighter than the bon fire on the other end of the beach. The problem with huge distances is that we have no visually inherent way of seeing the actual energy output of a star or galaxy to gague it's actual size and distance.

Ya or there is some stuff behind it Phone Post

unclephilly - 30 Billion miles away.

Go ahead. Wish on that star. Chances are it died off long ago. Just like your dreams.

lol

e. kaye -


How the heck is it moving at 97% the speed of light?   The energies involves are crazy.

The speed increases exponentially as one moves farther away from the central point of the universe. Phone Post 3.0

ksac - 
Jack Carter - 
FastAndBulbous - Yeah but it moved 17 billion light years in 13 billion years - that's faster than the speed of light. So we must be moving away from it as it moves away from us. But then would've been closer than 13 billion light years, and it's moved even more than that.

 

Because of the nature of expansion, the further away the galaxy is from us, the faster it is moving away from us. It's not that it's just increasing in speed, but rather it's being pushed along within units of space bound by the gravity of the mass within those units. It's much like how our own galaxy carries us along with it, within a galactic cluster that carries our galaxy along with it, within a galactic super cluster that carries our galactic cluster along with it. So even though Earth is moving at 18 miles per second, to someone viewing us from another galactic super cluster, we would be generally moving at least 15,000 times faster or much more depending on the velocity and direction of that cluster

 

That distant galaxy is moving away from us A LOT faster than galaxies closer to us


Actually, FastandBulbous asked an interesting question (if I'm interrupting it correctly); and it has yet to answered. I'm not saying you're wrong Jack, but you really didn't answer the question.

Let's say a photon leaves the galaxy 13 billion years ago, and that photon reaches us today. That means the galaxy was 13 billion light-years from us when it left that galaxy. In a static universe, we would know the galaxy was and still is 13 billion light-years from us.

But we know the universe is expanding, so let's say that it was moving and is still moving away from us at practically the speed of light (c) from our frame of reference. This is pretty much the top-end limit since any faster and the photons from the galaxy couldn't reach us (trying to get maximum distance here). This means the galaxy was able to travel 13 billion light-years from the point it emitted the photon that has reached us, which gives us a total of 26 billion light-years (starting 13 billion light-years from us and traveling at the speed of light for 13 billion years). Now, where does the extra 4 billion light-years come from?

We've already assumed maximum speed of expansion, yet there is a detail missing here. Can you spot it?

Wavelength of light? If it's the furthest object we can see, then it's not being seen in visible light, but in say infrared

 

Because that light had to travel at an ever increasing distance before it reached our eyes, it basically had to stretch to "accomodate" the expansion of space? Or rather the expansion itself forces light to stretch.

 

It's amazing to think about because we can't just view it as a photon of light traveling through space, we have to view it as a wave function.

 

But I probably got it half wrong. I'm all ears!

 

 

 

 

TTT Phone Post 3.0

It's expanding from a central point equally. Like two dots on either side of a balloon. As the balloon inflates the distance the dot moves is X, but the distance between the two dots is Y. Phone Post

Cheggers - 

It's expanding from a central point equally. Like two dots on either side of a balloon. As the balloon inflates the distance the dot moves is X, but the distance between the two dots is Y. Phone Post



Does that describe the central point of the universe or the central point of any two pieces of matter within it?

ksac - 
Jack Carter - 
ksac - 
Jack Carter - 
FastAndBulbous - Yeah but it moved 17 billion light years in 13 billion years - that's faster than the speed of light. So we must be moving away from it as it moves away from us. But then would've been closer than 13 billion light years, and it's moved even more than that.

 

Because of the nature of expansion, the further away the galaxy is from us, the faster it is moving away from us. It's not that it's just increasing in speed, but rather it's being pushed along within units of space bound by the gravity of the mass within those units. It's much like how our own galaxy carries us along with it, within a galactic cluster that carries our galaxy along with it, within a galactic super cluster that carries our galactic cluster along with it. So even though Earth is moving at 18 miles per second, to someone viewing us from another galactic super cluster, we would be generally moving at least 15,000 times faster or much more depending on the velocity and direction of that cluster

 

That distant galaxy is moving away from us A LOT faster than galaxies closer to us


Actually, FastandBulbous asked an interesting question (if I'm interrupting it correctly); and it has yet to answered. I'm not saying you're wrong Jack, but you really didn't answer the question.

Let's say a photon leaves the galaxy 13 billion years ago, and that photon reaches us today. That means the galaxy was 13 billion light-years from us when it left that galaxy. In a static universe, we would know the galaxy was and still is 13 billion light-years from us.

But we know the universe is expanding, so let's say that it was moving and is still moving away from us at practically the speed of light (c) from our frame of reference. This is pretty much the top-end limit since any faster and the photons from the galaxy couldn't reach us (trying to get maximum distance here). This means the galaxy was able to travel 13 billion light-years from the point it emitted the photon that has reached us, which gives us a total of 26 billion light-years (starting 13 billion light-years from us and traveling at the speed of light for 13 billion years). Now, where does the extra 4 billion light-years come from?

We've already assumed maximum speed of expansion, yet there is a detail missing here. Can you spot it?

Wavelength of light? If it's the furthest object we can see, then it's not being seen in visible light, but in say infrared

 

Because that light had to travel at an ever increasing distance before it reached our eyes, it basically had to stretch to "accomodate" the expansion of space? Or rather the expansion itself forces light to stretch.

 

It's amazing to think about because we can't just view it as a photon of light traveling through space, we have to view it as a wave function.

 

But I probably got it half wrong. I'm all ears!

 

 

 

 


Liking the way you're thinking, but the missing detail is in the way we measure these large distances. It's subtle in the language of the article, but can be vastly different in cosmology.

While the article states "It took 13 billion years for the light from the galaxy", that's really a light-travel distance. The statement "The galaxy is about 30 billion light-years away from Earth" is actually the comoving distance.

Boy did I bababooey that one!

 

So that galaxy did not move 17 billion light-years in 13-billion years; it moved 13 billion light-years in 13 billion years from a starting distance of 4 billion light years away!

 

 

Jack Carter - 


If there is intelligent life in that galaxy and they are looking at our galaxy through their various telescopes at this very moment, this is what they would see:



 





And if they turn around and look in



the other direction:



Ttt

To Asgard!!

unclephilly - 30 Billion miles away.

Go ahead. Wish on that star. Chances are it died off long ago. Just like your dreams.
LMFAO this is why I love this place Phone Post 3.0

mendelson - 
e. kaye -


How the heck is it moving at 97% the speed of light?   The energies involves are crazy.

The speed increases exponentially as one moves farther away from the central point of the universe. Phone Post 3.0


That still does not explain that sort of speed for something as massive as a galaxy.



 

Me thinks it's time to put some people in lifetime suits so that they can't die and ship the fuckers over there for however long it would take and check it out themselves

e. kaye -
mendelson - 
e. kaye -


How the heck is it moving at 97% the speed of light?   The energies involves are crazy.

The speed increases exponentially as one moves farther away from the central point of the universe. Phone Post 3.0


That still does not explain that sort of speed for something as massive as a galaxy.



 

Is it really moving at 97% the speed of light? Dont we measure it at that velocity because we are also moving away from that galaxy at high speeds? If we were in a galaxy next to that distant galaxy, we would not be measuring its velocity to be anywhere near the speed of light, correct? Phone Post 3.0