NASA: In 20 years we'll prove that we aren't alone

http://connecticut.cbslocal.com/2014/07/15/nasa-humans-will-prove-we-are-not-alone-in-the-universe-within-20-years/

 

NASA: Humans Will Prove ‘We Are Not Alone In The Universe’ Within 20 Years

 

 

Cambridge, Mass. (CBS CONNECTICUT) – NASA predicts that 100 million worlds in our own Milky Way galaxy may host alien life, and space program scientists estimate that humans will be able to find life within two decades.

Speaking at NASA’s Washington headquarters on Monday, the space agency outlined a plan to search for alien life using current telescope technology, and announced the launch of the Transiting Exoplanet Surveying Satellite in 2017. The NASA administrators and scientists estimate that humans will be able to locate alien life within the next 20 years.

“Just imagine the moment, when we find potential signatures of life. Imagine the moment when the world wakes up and the human race realizes that its long loneliness in time and space may be over — the possibility we’re no longer alone in the universe,” said Matt Mountain, director and Webb telescope scientist at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, which plans to launch the James Webb Space Telescope in 2018.

“What we didn’t know five years ago is that perhaps 10 to 20 per cent of stars around us have Earth-size planets in the habitable zone,” added Mountain. “It’s within our grasp to pull off a discovery that will change the world forever.”

Describing their own estimates as “conservative,” the NASA planet hunters calculate that 100 million worlds within the Milky Way galaxy are able to sustain complex alien life forms. The estimate accounts for the 17 billion Earth-sized worlds scientists believe to be orbiting the galaxy’s 100 billion stars.

The NASA panel says that ground-based and space-based technology – including the Hubble Space Telescope, the Kepler Space Telescope and the Spitzer Space Telescope – will be able to determine the presence of liquid water, an essential sign of potential alien life.

“I think in the next 20 years we will find out we are not alone in the universe,” said NASA astronomer Kevin Hand, who suggested that alien life may exist on Jupiter’s Europa moon.

“Do we believe there is life beyond Earth?” asked former astronaut and NASA Administrator Charles Bolden. “I would venture to say that most of my colleagues here today say it is improbable that in the limitless vastness of the universe we humans stand alone.”

The NASA panel said efforts are focused on finding signs of alien life on planets on other stars outside of our solar system.

“Sometime in the near future, people will be able to point to a star and say, ‘that star has a planet like Earth’,” said Sara Seager, professor of planetary science and physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Mass. “Astronomers think it is very likely that every single star in our Milky Way galaxy has at least one planet.”

"No we won't" - Jack Carter

Fucking right we will

- Hemlock

It is rather arrogant to think we are the only planet with life on it when you consider the numbers.

"Describing their own estimates as “conservative,” the NASA planet hunters calculate that 100 million worlds within the Milky Way galaxy are able to sustain complex alien life forms. The estimate accounts for the 17 billion Earth-sized worlds scientists believe to be orbiting the galaxy’s 100 billion stars."

Microbial life, sure. Maybe some kind of squid-like life in the waters, perhaps.

 

Advanced life like ourselves at this point in time? Slim to none.

 

The stability of our star system is probably unparalled in our entire Milky Way galaxy.

I think there's a decent chance that NASA already has proof that we are not alone.

Shouldn't we have flying cars by now

- PatK

disbeliever -
Jack Carter - 


Microbial life, sure. Maybe some kind of squid-like life in the waters, perhaps.



 



Advanced life like ourselves at this point in time? Slim to none.



 



The stability of our star system is probably unparalled in our entire Milky Way galaxy.


What exactly do you base your last sentence on?
This. I didn't think we had enough information to describe the stability of all the other solar systems out there. Phone Post 3.0

Silly scientists. I can prove the existence of aliens right now:

Phone Post 3.0

"please stop cutting our funding"

"Scientists leave laboratory for fire drill, discovers they're not alone in the Universe"

“Just imagine the moment, when we find potential signatures of life."


This isn't the same thing as proving we are not alone, potential signatures of life could mean any number of things such as the atmosphere is is the correct density to allow the existence of life.

disbeliever - 
Jack Carter - 


Microbial life, sure. Maybe some kind of squid-like life in the waters, perhaps.



 



Advanced life like ourselves at this point in time? Slim to none.



 



The stability of our star system is probably unparalled in our entire Milky Way galaxy.


What exactly do you base your last sentence on?

the bible, look it up brah.

You can probably find it right next to twilight, harry potter, lord of the rings.

what does the bible have to do with anything that Jack said

Many factors:

 

The fact that most stars we see are actually binary stars. Two stars orbiting eachother so any planets caught in those binary star systems would have less stability in probably every sense.

 

A massive planet closer to the outer solar system is essential in attracting life-extinction asteroids before they make their way towards Earth.

 

If the Earth never had another planet smash into it early on, creating a moon that stabilized its rotation to create tides and weather that promotes the proliferation of life, we would not be here.

 

(speculation) If Mars did not have pieces of it blasted off with organic molecules that crashed into the Earth, life may never have begun at all.

 

Our distance from the center of the Milky Way is also crutial. Our star system is in the "Goldilocks Zone" of the Milky Way. Too far in or out and advanced life becomes less probable.

 

We really could be the only advanced life that exists in our Galaxy.

17 billion earth like planets in the Milky Way Galaxy alone.

With a conservative # of 100 billion galaxies that is a staggering number of potential planets to have life. Phone Post 3.0

disbeliever - 
Jack Carter - 

Many factors:

 

The fact that most stars we see are actually binary stars. Two stars orbiting eachother so any planets caught in those binary star systems would have less stability in probably every sense.

 

A massive planet closer to the outer solar system is essential in attracting life-extinction asteroids before they make their way towards Earth.

 

If the Earth never had another planet smash into it early on, creating a moon that stabilized its rotation to create tides and weather that promotes the proliferation of life, we would not be here.

 

(speculation) If Mars did not have pieces of it blasted off with organic molecules that crashed into the Earth, life may never have begun at all.

 

Our distance from the center of the Milky Way is also crutial. Our star system is in the "Goldilocks Zone" of the Milky Way. Too far in or out and advanced life becomes less probable.

 

We really could be the only advanced life that exists in our Galaxy.

<br />
<span class="User-179626" id="userPost50150393">This is either a great troll, or an epic failure of logic, filled with a mountain of assumptions.</span></blockquote>

 

Do tell

 

It takes greater assumption to think that there is intelligent life anywhere near us. Based on what? It wasn't long ago that we thought there must be advanced life on the planets in our own solar system. Not only have we found no intelligent life on them, but we haven't found even the most basic forms of life on them. Not even a single bacteria on Mars.

 

Now we say that there must be advanced life within the Galaxy. I think we're going to let ourselves down once again.

 

Mike_in_CA - 17 billion earth like planets in the Milky Way Galaxy alone.

With a conservative # of 100 billion galaxies that is a staggering number of potential planets to have life. Phone Post 3.0

 

What kind of life? Microbial or Advanced life capable of searching for other life in the universe?

 

17 billion is actually not a lot for the odds we're playing with

Cecil -
disbeliever -
Jack Carter - 

Microbial life, sure. Maybe some kind of squid-like life in the waters, perhaps.

 

Advanced life like ourselves at this point in time? Slim to none.

 

The stability of our star system is probably unparalled in our entire Milky Way galaxy.

    <br />
    What exactly do you base your last sentence on?</blockquote>
This. I didn't think we had enough information to describe the stability of all the other solar systems out there. <img alt="Phone Post 3.0" border="0" src="/images/phone/droid.png" style="vertical-align:middle;" /></blockquote>

We kind of do based on the vast knowledge base we have of stars themselves.

Like I said, the fact that most stars are not single stars but binary/trinary systems is a huge factor. Also, the type of star is critical. A star that burns it's fuel at a rapid pace will not be around long enough for its planets to do much of anything. Phone Post 3.0

PatK - 


Shouldn't we have flying cars by now



- PatK


Or Bubble-jets?

-that old dude that used to freak all the kids out by asking us for spare change to build his spaceship landing pad.