Need college major advice

Academic ground doesn't get to much action, so I'd thought that I would post here.

I almost have an associates degree. I stopped going to college years ago to support my wife in her continuing education and career advancement plus I had a son too. I am trying to go back. I currently have a good job in manufacturing and have recently been offered 100% tuition reimbursement starting in November 2015. Once I obtain the degree of my choosing I would be transfered somewhere where my skills would be better put to use, so probably a good idea to go ahead and start planning.

I need to of course choose a major that they would reimburse. My company manufactures flexible packaging for food and also medical products too. They don't really have a list of "accepted" majors per se, but something like chemical engineering would be a no brainer I imagine. I plan to discuss this in further detail with my superiors since I have quite a few meetings next week. Not sure if I will stay with the company long term or not.

I'm really at a loss about what to do though. In my spare time I really enjoy researching information relating to geography, climate data, demographics, etc. I also have extremely strong communication skills, so I could work in a group easily. I've taken career aptitude tests and not surprisingly they all recommend jobs like geographer, cartographer, surveyor, archaeologist. I think my background in the arts (music) may have skewed the results towards those careers though....

Are there any majors that utilize a similar skill set, but would be deemed useful to my company? Other than manufacturing related jobs they have departments staffed by people with backgrounds in IT, finance, accounting, quality assurance, engineering, etc. They have also really been focused on the green/sustainability/environmental side of their business lately.

One more thing. I would only be interested in pursuing a 100% online degree since I work a rotating schedule that would make attending classes in person impossible.

Thanks to OG in advance

FRAT version: Looking for 100% online degree that would be useful to/reimbursed by a manufacturing company

At my school, chemical engineering was widely regarded as the hardest major. That's all I got. Phone Post 3.0

Online? Stay away from engineering then.  You'll spend all of that time trying to essentially teach yourself physics and calculus. 

 

Why not accounting?  It's the bases for a finance degree now anyways.  No company will hire a CFO without their CPA.

 

My old college roomate has his undergrad in finance and doing his grad work in accounting because of this.  He said it would have been a lot easier had he done it right (accounting then finance) before hand. And you can take an accounting degree anywhere. 

It's like the Electricians License of white collar jobs lol.

Triple_B - Academic ground doesn't get to much action, so I'd thought that I would post here.

I almost have an associates degree. I stopped going to college years ago to support my wife in her continuing education and career advancement plus I had a son too. I am trying to go back. I currently have a good job in manufacturing and have recently been offered 100% tuition reimbursement starting in November 2015. Once I obtain the degree of my choosing I would be transfered somewhere where my skills would be better put to use, so probably a good idea to go ahead and start planning.

I need to of course choose a major that they would reimburse. My company manufactures flexible packaging for food and also medical products too. They don't really have a list of "accepted" majors per se, but something like chemical engineering would be a no brainer I imagine. I plan to discuss this in further detail with my superiors since I have quite a few meetings next week. Not sure if I will stay with the company long term or not.

I'm really at a loss about what to do though. In my spare time I really enjoy researching information relating to geography, climate data, demographics, etc. I also have extremely strong communication skills, so I could work in a group easily. I've taken career aptitude tests and not surprisingly they all recommend jobs like geographer, cartographer, surveyor, archaeologist. I think my background in the arts (music) may have skewed the results towards those careers though....

Are there any majors that utilize a similar skill set, but would be deemed useful to my company? Other than manufacturing related jobs they have departments staffed by people with backgrounds in IT, finance, accounting, quality assurance, engineering, etc. They have also really been focused on the green/sustainability/environmental side of their business lately.

One more thing. I would only be interested in pursuing a 100% online degree since I work a rotating schedule that would make attending classes in person impossible.

Thanks to OG in advance

You mention your interest in geography, climate data, and demographics, along with your strong communication skills and willingness to work in a group. I'd say major in marketing, or business admin with a marketing minor. If it would line up with your potential advancement within the company and fits the company's needs.

RTWu - At my school, chemical engineering was widely regarded as the hardest major. That's all I got. Phone Post 3.0

Yea I don't think I would be to good at any sort of engineering related discipline, so no big deal.

I think I was good at chemistry and biology in high school though.

I don't know anything about online but it sounds like industrial engineering or materials engineering would be a perfect fit. Phone Post 3.0

sweaterofabsolutevictory - 


Online? Stay away from engineering then.  You'll spend all of that time trying to essentially teach yourself physics and calculus. 



 



Why not accounting?  It's the bases for a finance degree now anyways.  No company will hire a CFO without their CPA.



 



My old college roomate has his undergrad in finance and doing his grad work in accounting because of this.  He said it would have been a lot easier had he done it right (accounting then finance) before hand. And you can take an accounting degree anywhere. 



It's like the Electricians License of white collar jobs lol.


Thank you for the advice, but what exactly about my post makes you think accounting would be for me? Or are you just recommending it because it is a good job and a safe bet?

You could always go something general like business or management, those skill sets are easily transferable to a wide array of areas.

detroitdevon - 
Triple_B - Academic ground doesn't get to much action, so I'd thought that I would post here.

I almost have an associates degree. I stopped going to college years ago to support my wife in her continuing education and career advancement plus I had a son too. I am trying to go back. I currently have a good job in manufacturing and have recently been offered 100% tuition reimbursement starting in November 2015. Once I obtain the degree of my choosing I would be transfered somewhere where my skills would be better put to use, so probably a good idea to go ahead and start planning.

I need to of course choose a major that they would reimburse. My company manufactures flexible packaging for food and also medical products too. They don't really have a list of "accepted" majors per se, but something like chemical engineering would be a no brainer I imagine. I plan to discuss this in further detail with my superiors since I have quite a few meetings next week. Not sure if I will stay with the company long term or not.

I'm really at a loss about what to do though. In my spare time I really enjoy researching information relating to geography, climate data, demographics, etc. I also have extremely strong communication skills, so I could work in a group easily. I've taken career aptitude tests and not surprisingly they all recommend jobs like geographer, cartographer, surveyor, archaeologist. I think my background in the arts (music) may have skewed the results towards those careers though....

Are there any majors that utilize a similar skill set, but would be deemed useful to my company? Other than manufacturing related jobs they have departments staffed by people with backgrounds in IT, finance, accounting, quality assurance, engineering, etc. They have also really been focused on the green/sustainability/environmental side of their business lately.

One more thing. I would only be interested in pursuing a 100% online degree since I work a rotating schedule that would make attending classes in person impossible.

Thanks to OG in advance

You mention your interest in geography, climate data, and demographics, along with your strong communication skills and willingness to work in a group. I'd say major in marketing, or business admin with a marketing minor. If it would line up with your potential advancement within the company and fits the company's needs.

Really? Hmm never thought about business....

Thanks

By the way degree doesn't necessarily have to be best fit for company or give me best chance for advancement within the company. I have no idea whether I'll be here long term or not. We moved to my current location last year for wife's job and will move again for the right opportunity/promotion.

Thanks again though

thestateofmePeaHead - I don't know anything about online but it sounds like industrial engineering or materials engineering would be a perfect fit. Phone Post 3.0

For the company or because of the info I posted about myself?

Those seem like very hands on majors, not sure about the online thing either.

4 letters everyone looking for college major advice should know : STEM

Jason - 


4 letters everyone looking for college major advice should know : STEM


In general, yes.

Depends on the person also I'd say though. I already have a job with a rotating schedule that makes me more than the average recent <5 years removed from college grad. I also have a family too, so attending classes in person (something you would probably need to do for most STEM majors) is not something I'm capable of doing right now.

Environmental Science. EVERY manufacturing company has an EHS (environment, health & safety) manager, and larger companies will have EHS coordinators under the manager. It is a growing field.

But if you are not great with science classes to begin with, then getting some sort of business degree will be a safer bet for you.

Leigh - 
sweaterofabsolutevictory -


Online? Stay away from engineering then.  You'll spend all of that time trying to essentially teach yourself physics and calculus. 



 



Why not accounting?  It's the bases for a finance degree now anyways.  No company will hire a CFO without their CPA.



 



My old college roomate has his undergrad in finance and doing his grad work in accounting because of this.  He said it would have been a lot easier had he done it right (accounting then finance) before hand. And you can take an accounting degree anywhere. 



It's like the Electricians License of white collar jobs lol.

I would respectfully disagree with the conclusion. Yes you will have to teach yourself but I did an engineering degree and didn't learn anything in lectures or classes. I stopped going and spent my time studying and I aced my degree. I'm not saying you should do the same thing but the points I am trying to make are:

1) engineering is a very good degree to get in a sea of shit majors
2) you can study at home and succeed Phone Post 3.0

Interesting.....

My good friend is a mechanical engineer and he said something similar about not really learning much in class. He had to figure out a lot of stuff on the job. I don't recall him going to class consistently when I lived with him either.

My wife also has various degrees in science and is working on one in electrical engineering. She might be able to help me out with the studying too.

Triple_B - 
Jason - 


4 letters everyone looking for college major advice should know : STEM


In general, yes.

Depends on the person also I'd say though. I already have a job with a rotating schedule that makes me more than the average recent <5 years removed from college grad. I also have a family too, so attending classes in person (something you would probably need to do for most STEM majors) is not something I'm capable of doing right now.


There are plenty of STEM degrees you can do online, I just think they are harder because online learning requires a lot of teaching yourself

Triple_B - 
sweaterofabsolutevictory - 


Online? Stay away from engineering then.  You'll spend all of that time trying to essentially teach yourself physics and calculus. 



 



Why not accounting?  It's the bases for a finance degree now anyways.  No company will hire a CFO without their CPA.



 



My old college roomate has his undergrad in finance and doing his grad work in accounting because of this.  He said it would have been a lot easier had he done it right (accounting then finance) before hand. And you can take an accounting degree anywhere. 



It's like the Electricians License of white collar jobs lol.


Thank you for the advice, but what exactly about my post makes you think accounting would be for me? Or are you just recommending it because it is a good job and a safe bet?


Well most people on the outside looking into college don't see the whole picture.



 



If you want something with a great base and transferable it's accounting.  Even without your CPA the degree itself would get you a job in QA (quality assurance), assembly control, human resources, etc.



 



It's a great base to start and then go into something more specialized later.



 



And tbh it is a good job, pay, safe, transferable, all the things they don't tell you while going to college.  They fail to let people like you know once you have the degree you have to bid against others with that same degree but with 20+ experience.  So you take a lot less pay for same job or transfer to another job in which you are suited.

Pig Bun - Environmental Science. EVERY manufacturing company has an EHS (environment, health & safety) manager, and larger companies will have EHS coordinators under the manager. It is a growing field.

But if you are not great with science classes to begin with, then getting some sort of business degree will be a safer bet for you.

I didn't consider this. To be honest I can't really picture what being an environmental major would be like. I do understand the environmental concerns a manufacturing company has though. It is a growing part of my company also.

I got Bs in chemistry and biology in high school without studying. Not sure if that means anything. I don't recall them being considered especially difficult.

Is it well suited for online learning? Bachelors degree good enough or is higher education required?

Also what are some types of jobs that an environmental major would work in that are NOT related to the manufacturing process?

Jason - 
Triple_B - 
Jason - 


4 letters everyone looking for college major advice should know : STEM


In general, yes.

Depends on the person also I'd say though. I already have a job with a rotating schedule that makes me more than the average recent <5 years removed from college grad. I also have a family too, so attending classes in person (something you would probably need to do for most STEM majors) is not something I'm capable of doing right now.


There are plenty of STEM degrees you can do online, I just think they are harder because online learning requires a lot of teaching yourself


Which ones are best for online learning? I don't really have a STEM background. My AP and upper level classes always involved stuff like history, english, etc. My science classes were easy in high school, but I don't think that is any indication of success in a STEM field.

sweaterofabsolutevictory - 
Triple_B - 
sweaterofabsolutevictory - 


Online? Stay away from engineering then.  You'll spend all of that time trying to essentially teach yourself physics and calculus. 



 



Why not accounting?  It's the bases for a finance degree now anyways.  No company will hire a CFO without their CPA.



 



My old college roomate has his undergrad in finance and doing his grad work in accounting because of this.  He said it would have been a lot easier had he done it right (accounting then finance) before hand. And you can take an accounting degree anywhere. 



It's like the Electricians License of white collar jobs lol.


Thank you for the advice, but what exactly about my post makes you think accounting would be for me? Or are you just recommending it because it is a good job and a safe bet?


Well most people on the outside looking into college don't see the whole picture.



 



If you want something with a great base and transferable it's accounting.  Even without your CPA the degree itself would get you a job in QA (quality assurance), assembly control, human resources, etc.



 



It's a great base to start and then go into something more specialized later.



 



And tbh it is a good job, pay, safe, transferable, all the things they don't tell you while going to college.  They fail to let people like you know once you have the degree you have to bid against others with that same degree but with 20+ experience.  So you take a lot less pay for same job or transfer to another job in which you are suited.


Hmm thanks alot its something to think about. Not sure if I'm a numbers guy, but if it easily transferable I should give it serious consideration.

When you say go into something more specialized later........what are some examples you can give?