Owning A Food Truck

Second attempt at this thread. I've just been made redundant and about to come into a reasonable sum of cash. Thinking about starting up a food truck.

Any you guys got any advice in this field? 

Hmmm, I would have thought with your mate being successful he would have made decent money Ned?

Im not scared of long hours n stuff. The thought of working long hours appeals more when I'm doing it for myself other than a corporate company.

people say they are willing to work long hours, but the reality for most wage slaves is that doing a 70 hour week isn't even a thought that pops into their minds. 

let alone doing 70 hour weeks for years.

the amount of times i've heard this little chestnut "just get a manager in and do it"

managers, and in general, employees have no vested interest in running a business at its optimum. they slack off, take short cuts, cut corners, whatever. some employees are great, but the reality is they don't care if the business makes money or not, they just want to get paid.

and in food retail, it's not their end goal, it's a stepping stone to something else better

that being said, don't get into food.

ps, i've been in food retail practically all my life, 20 +years


I just bought a 20 ft Soft Serve ice cream trailer. Gonna chase that ice cream cash!!

laws vary from state to state so you need to check what you'll be up against.

In NC you need a commercial kitchen which is subjected to health inspectors ect to prepare your food. So if you think you'll save money because you just need a truck, it's not true in this state.

You also need to find out where you can park your truck, different cites have different ordinances which need to be followed.

Depending of course on what type of food you make you'll want to be at different types of venues.

You can make money, but it's not easy, and like any business will have it's overhead and challenges.

Bisping=Champ4Life - 

Hmmm, I would have thought with your mate being successful he would have made decent money Ned?

Im not scared of long hours n stuff. The thought of working long hours appeals more when I'm doing it for myself other than a corporate company.


It's a tough business even if you're good at it.

I think that opening a small restaurant would be a much better option. I worked in a good truck and it wasn't too bad. But as Ned said, takes all of the owners time. To make big bucks, you have to get into events and fairs, but you also have to put in a nice chunk of change to do that. There are a lot more factors that come up than if you just had a restaurant, although both are difficult to make profitable. I'd say the food truck is more difficult all around, but I'm not an expert 

Bisping=Champ4Life - 

Hmmm, I would have thought with your mate being successful he would have made decent money Ned?

Im not scared of long hours n stuff. The thought of working long hours appeals more when I'm doing it for myself other than a corporate company.


No overpriced drinks or wine?

No profit.

Think you can do a food truck? Try just doing trunk/cooler burritos after bars let out.

Most of these guys are illegal, unlicensed. Get your toes wet.

If you haven't already managed your own business, and your own kitchen, a food truck would throw you in way over your head.

Never had a food truck, but did co-own a catering company in Connecticut and we would do the fair scene from Spring to Fall. The money was good but yes you're working constantly during the week to prep for the weekend, and you're at the fair/carnival all weekend. The money was good but not worth consuming your entire life, in my opinion.

Just make a beer truck. Have 15 beers on Tap. No cooking, bigger margins and more enticing

I co-own a decently successful food company(not a food truck.) If you don't have experience doing something similar I would 100% NOT do this. Making money is a lot harder than it seems.

andyman011 - Just make a beer truck. Have 15 beers on Tap. No cooking, bigger margins and more enticing

I would assume this is illegal in like 99.9% of america

I know nothing but I have a friend that recently started a mobile barbershop. He set up a Mercedes Sprinter with tankless water heaters and everything you'd need. I haven't seen it in person yet but the pictures look bad ass. He's kind of your hipster traditional barber which seems to be popular right now. I'm getting my first straight razor shave from him this weekend. I have no idea what he makes but I think with the popularity of food trucks and similar you have to try to find something different.

If I did a food truck it would be a bbq/grill on the go. In my area finding a burger or even a steak cooked on a charcoal grill is almost impossible. 

 

There was one truck that had lines of people for their burgers that weren't anything special aside that it was grilled on charcoal and they used fresh meat that they grounded themselves. 

 

The halal guys in the city crush it, you have likes of 50+ people all night long. 6 bucks a plate which is imagine they probably make 3 in profit they probably take and they do 1 plate a min if not more. 

 

There re was a rumor that the Hilton offered them 2 million to move because they felt the likes were taking away from the hotel. They declined the offer so I'm sure they make a crazy amount, 

 

 

the commissary - prep part is a huge part of the $$$

you have to rent out a kitchen in the AM from someplace

i used to know to some Asians who supported a whole house full of illegals- in the festival business selling Sweet Meat Sticks

took crap meat and marinated it overnight - then grill it on the spot
like 4 of those guys rode in the back of a cargo truck for hours and hours to get to events

cruedi - laws vary from state to state so you need to check what you'll be up against.

In NC you need a commercial kitchen which is subjected to health inspectors ect to prepare your food. So if you think you'll save money because you just need a truck, it's not true in this state.

You also need to find out where you can park your truck, different cites have different ordinances which need to be followed.

Depending of course on what type of food you make you'll want to be at different types of venues.

You can make money, but it's not easy, and like any business will have it's overhead and challenges.
And it's an EXTREMELY competitive business. You cross into someone else's turf, and you'll get shot.

EasyTapper - 
cruedi - laws vary from state to state so you need to check what you'll be up against.

In NC you need a commercial kitchen which is subjected to health inspectors ect to prepare your food. So if you think you'll save money because you just need a truck, it's not true in this state.

You also need to find out where you can park your truck, different cites have different ordinances which need to be followed.

Depending of course on what type of food you make you'll want to be at different types of venues.

You can make money, but it's not easy, and like any business will have it's overhead and challenges.
And it's an EXTREMELY competitive business. You cross into someone else's turf, and you'll get shot.

exactly, and as someone said events (like food truck rodeos, state fairs) will charge a lot get into and often will make you show up 2-3 hours before the event starts and you're there until 2-3 hours after the events over.

Many of them also have no refunds so if it pours the day of the event you're basically out of your money.

Z NEDCMK1 - 
Bisping=Champ4Life - 

Hmmm, I would have thought with your mate being successful he would have made decent money Ned?

Im not scared of long hours n stuff. The thought of working long hours appeals more when I'm doing it for myself other than a corporate company.



His margins are razor thin. If there weren't 1000 food trucks, maybe not.



Do you have any history in the restaurant industry?


In NY I can totally see that.

Here in the Twin Cities trucks make bank. I know of a few that only work from spring to fall, they take the entire winter off simply because they can. Every suburban city has there own summer festival/carnival, they work those and then do regular spots during the week, they are working 24/7 so there isn't a lot of time to spend the revenue and it piles up.

I know one for sure that makes $300-$400,000 a year, again with winter off. That may not be huge in NY but $400,000 in MN is killing it.

The Corn stand at the MN State fair brings in a half a million dollars in 12 days...for selling corn on the fucking cob

There is a cookie stand that makes 2.5 million


In 12 fucking days!