Purple Belt Blues

Here's my situation.

I have been training for the last two 2 years in Japan (Tri-Force) and recently received my purple belt.

It was a bitter sweet moment for me as the next week I moved to Australia.

Now, I think I have become accustomed to rolling with smaller , lighter guys cuz I am having real issues with some of the big fellas in Oz.

I'm 74kg and the guys I am training with are regularly 85-97kg.

Its little things that are getting me. I pass guard and they can roll out, I take the back and they can just rip my hook off.

What training ideas do people recommend who have made a similar transition?

I'm living with a Greek family and lamb and cheese are pretty much part of every meal so you might be right.

Different school, different games and body types than you're used to. I wouldn't overthink it. Just keep training and enjoy growing into your belt (literally and figuratively)

What part of Oz are you in dude?

do you train with Gracie Oceania in Marickville ...

Who are you Basher??

lol

maybe

Peter

I'm in Sydney.

The Basher is on to me.

:)


Keep your head up!

Dont get me wrong guys I'm not down about this I'm just looking for some pointers about how to handle larger opponents.

BTW the big guys are technical too.

Something I've been realizing as a purple is focusing on staying tighter and keeping the mindset that position above all else. Especially realizing the power of playing top. I play a lot with the lower belts and get to top then finish and what not really made me lazy, even playing bottom with lower belts made me lazy in general. When I go against better guys I'm so used to just going for things I get swept or basically lose good position because I was too open or chose to attack when I did not have complete control of everything. I shouldn't "just" go for things, I need to be committed.

-First I got to side and then hunted for the sub
-Then later on I got to side, waited for them to settle and flatten out, then I attacked
-Now I go to side, DOMINATE, tie them up, both shoulders flat on the ground, knees facing away from me(twisting them), set up subs by moving their arms and head with my body while all my grips, legs, and hips are still Dominating. Then I go for the sub once I know I will get it. And I also choose subs now with little risk of losing top position if it fails.

Position is king, especially against bigger guys.

This is why I'm glad to be at a gym with so many different sized guys.

Its good for you.

As a midget Australian - I weigh about 65kg at the moment and I don't have a six pack I'd firstly like to call you a pussy for whinging. Aussies don't whinge.

Secondly get the back. I spent some time trying to get good at holding mount but in my opinion your time is better off focusing on other positions.

Congrats on move to Aus-land. And the Greek fam is an especially lucky choice. We Greeks eat whole-heartedly and u will gain weight. But importantly u will gain knowledge. Keep rolling, u will grow used to the big boys and they will no longer b big in comparison. U just need to stay tighter ur used to being bigger and being able to control. U must work with the bigger, most skilled in ur gym. After time they will b normal, everyone else will b small and less skiled Phone Post

Steve

Who's whinging, I'm looking for tips that's all. I wish you all the best in your quest for ripped abs.

Thanks Mongoose.

Well at least now I know how all those 63kg Japanese guys felt training with me.

When I go with big guys I try to avoid connecting myself to them so I can float on them more. Staying out of mount and controlling the back with out hooks lets me transition when they try to escape and muscle me around.

I'm 77 to 80 kilos and 6 foot and generally use this approach with guys that are 10 or 15 kilos or more bigger than myself.

I'm a purple as well its the most frustrating belt so far lol..


I've had similar experiences to what you describe.

I tend to take it easy on less experienced guys, with the idea to use as little strength as possible to sweep, submit, etc.

I wasn't being lazy, I was trying to improve myself by using as pure technique as possible and just a tiny amount of muscle. I've heard this advice from many high level guys that end up training frequently with less experienced guys.

The downside of the way I did it -- where I went wrong -- was that I ended up using as little muscle as possible but also using too little technique as well.

I didn't realize it at the time, but when I started training with bigger guys closer to my level, I realize that I had gotten too lose and sloppy with a lot of my moves.

For instance, just like all purple belts, I can sweep a white belt (especially one my size or smaller) with a scissor sweep using little muscle and even mediocre technique. In my desire to not use strength, I think I ended up also doing (for instance) a pretty lukewarm scissor sweep.

Another example is that I hated (as a white belt) being squished from side control. Yes, it was part of the learning process and it helped me grow, and so on. However, a lot of it was just the top guy being sadistic and me taking a lot of punishment and not progressing because I was still a long way off from learning the proper escapes.

With whites and blues, I can almost always keep them in side control just floating and moving around effectively (like a yoga ball drill) and without pressuring them much at all. That doesn't translate that well with higher level guys, especially the bigger ones.

I realize now I need to focus on controlling lower level guys with stuff like crossface, but I don't want them to feel like I a trying to break their jaw. Instead, I just want to make sure I can keep their head turned away from me. That kills their bridge and shrimp and I can still do it without being a total jerk. It then translates well to bigger guys because I can apply the right amount of pressure to keep them controlled from the side. Also, it blends well with the floating approach because I can switch back and forth as needed.

I think now it's important to still use minimal strength with beginners, but at the same time, keep the technique extremely crisp. For example, keeping nice structure on the bottom, perfect posture on the top, deviate their spinal alignment properly, etc. -- just do it without using muscle and without being such a jackass that they still want to keep training.

 Keep training with larger opponents?



At my school I am one of the smaller guys and I am 5'7" 190. Having said that, it is awesome when I finally get to roll with guys around my height as I just feel like it is so much easier as I generally just get tooled all day by guys way bigger than me. I am also losing weight and want to be about 155 so this is only going to get rougher over time. 



Training with big guys is great imo. Very difficult but it can only make you better. 

the blues happen at purple belt too? ffffuuuuuu

New school, new style. You just need to acclimate. IMHO

htownbjj - 
I've had similar experiences to what you describe.

I tend to take it easy on less experienced guys, with the idea to use as little strength as possible to sweep, submit, etc.

I wasn't being lazy, I was trying to improve myself by using as pure technique as possible and just a tiny amount of muscle. I've heard this advice from many high level guys that end up training frequently with less experienced guys.

The downside of the way I did it -- where I went wrong -- was that I ended up using as little muscle as possible but also using too little technique as well.

I didn't realize it at the time, but when I started training with bigger guys closer to my level, I realize that I had gotten too lose and sloppy with a lot of my moves.

For instance, just like all purple belts, I can sweep a white belt (especially one my size or smaller) with a scissor sweep using little muscle and even mediocre technique. In my desire to not use strength, I think I ended up also doing (for instance) a pretty lukewarm scissor sweep.

Another example is that I hated (as a white belt) being squished from side control. Yes, it was part of the learning process and it helped me grow, and so on. However, a lot of it was just the top guy being sadistic and me taking a lot of punishment and not progressing because I was still a long way off from learning the proper escapes.

With whites and blues, I can almost always keep them in side control just floating and moving around effectively (like a yoga ball drill) and without pressuring them much at all. That doesn't translate that well with higher level guys, especially the bigger ones.

I realize now I need to focus on controlling lower level guys with stuff like crossface, but I don't want them to feel like I a trying to break their jaw. Instead, I just want to make sure I can keep their head turned away from me. That kills their bridge and shrimp and I can still do it without being a total jerk. It then translates well to bigger guys because I can apply the right amount of pressure to keep them controlled from the side. Also, it blends well with the floating approach because I can switch back and forth as needed.

I think now it's important to still use minimal strength with beginners, but at the same time, keep the technique extremely crisp. For example, keeping nice structure on the bottom, perfect posture on the top, deviate their spinal alignment properly, etc. -- just do it without using muscle and without being such a jackass that they still want to keep training.



I might have chosen different words to describe what I was experiencing as a purple but I'm with you on what you said. Almost identical to my post. Its good to hear that at purple is when we re-evaluate everything we do and rebuild or refocus. That is how I feel about where I'm at as a purp.

I realize one thing though. When I was white even up to today, getting crushed is a part of going up in the ranks. I used to say I wouldn't be the guy putting the pressure down on lower belts but now I know that it is a part of jiujitsu and it is simply not just picking on the lower rank, but pressuring is a part of everyone's game and should be used and the lower belts should feel the potential of this. There are some absolutes in jiujitsu and pressure is one of them. It's not "just" crushing either, there is fine details along with the unlimited ways to grip and stop their movement.