Quick Route to Kickboxing Skills?

I've BJJ'ed for years and there are plenty of things I now know I should have done to get better really quickly. The most famous refrain is "relax, and then you'll learn faster". But there are more like "visualise techniques daily" and "put yourself in bad positions".

But how would I get good at kickboxing in just two months assuming I could go at it full-time?

Like in that tv program "faking it" where people get 6 weeks to become convincing racing drivers, or stand up comedians and they do it because their teachers make sure they miss out the usual mistakes (and the failures are always the ones who ignore the advice).

So, again, how would I get at least convincing in just 2 months? What mistakes should I miss out? Thanks.

from my experience, couple things:

first and foremost, learn how to stand correctly

learn technique for each move

light spar daily

Some people pick it up and can be competent very very quickly (Doubt 2 weeks though) while some just dont get it at all.

It's like everything else.

What would I get from private lessons that I can make sure I add to my own training or light sparring with friends? Or would it more be a case of correcting mistakes?

To maintain on footwork and motion would it be a good idea to spend the first week or so (maybe about 15hrs) getting the hang of that? And if so, what aspects?

Good answers so far, thanks a lot.

hit mitts and spar every chance you get. First bad habit you'll need to break is bending at the waist when ducking punches.

If I just light sparred with a superior guy for a few hours a day for six of the eight weeks - and maybe struck bags to build power - what would I be missing? I'd surely learn to avoid bad habits like letting my hands drop? But is there anything else?

Are combos important? Do they come from sparring or from knowing a good combo and drilling it?

Consistent heavy bag work is good.

Also, there are no shortcuts.

Ogami, there are always shortcuts. People say there aren't because they think you're lazy if you ask. But you may not be lazy, you may be smart.

Amd there are smart ways to train amd prepare and those are the shortcuts.

I can tell you a whole load of ways to get good at various subjects faster than you normally would and I just wish my instructors had known them for BJJ rather than just saying "relax" or "just keep on training". Maybe they meant so much more when they said with those words and just left me to figure out the details - but giving me the details would have been a shortcut.

I suggest you read up on accelerated learning and change your belief system and thus your potenial.

I think striking arts are a lot more difficult to learn than grappling, they are so fast paced.

Train at The Pit, with Grandmaster John Hackleman.

Gary Hughes

"So, again, how would I get at least convincing in just 2 months? What mistakes should I miss out? Thanks."


i have to ask, what are you calling convincing? I also need to know what do you mean "full time"?

great thread

"I think striking arts are a lot more difficult to learn than grappling, they are so fast paced."

Absolutely not true. Its the way people tend to train and the lack of frequency that gives this perception.

"If I just light sparred with a superior guy for a few hours a day for six of the eight weeks - and maybe struck bags to build power - what would I be missing? I'd surely learn to avoid bad habits like letting my hands drop? But is there anything else?"

one of the absolute worst ways to get better faster. Tell me how much training time youhave in a given day and I can explain more fully.

Train in Thailand for a year, twice a day.

C

HAVE SOMEONE VIDEO YOUR SPARRING!

You might note feel like you are making mistakes, but when you sit back and watch youself from a different angle, you will SEE mistakes real quickly.

Regarding footwork, while you can practice the mechanics of moving in different directions and using different means (e.g. stepping, shuffling, switching, and so on) on your own, your footwork is only going to be useful when combined with attributes like timing and distancing. You will only get that by working with a partner, whether through sparring, pad drills, or something similar.

The offensive techniques and tactics you might develop will be much less effective if your footwork is poor, so rather than drilling footwork for an intense but brief period in the beginning, it's something you need to devote time and awareness to throughout your training, however short that training may be.

I still need a few anwswers. What are you calling "convincing" as a level of ability? To look like you can hit pads and look like you know what you are doing? To work a bag and people see you and think you are decent? Or to step in front of someone else who wants to fight, has trained to fight, and breaking them off a spicy 4 piece?

Just for my clarity I am curious as to what you are calling 'convincing" which to me is a poor choice of words, almost like you want to fool someone into thinking you are a decent kickboxer after 2 months. Which you will not be in two months, but that is beside the point.

"...has trained to fight, and breaking them off a spicy 4 piece?"

firstly, nice writing.

Secondly, although it isn't my thread, who cares about the "showy" part of convincing. Please tell us how to break off that spicy 4 piece!

Jab, cross, hook to the body, if body shot makes nice contact opponent backs off elbows tucked to ribs gasping for breath, then right high kick to grill.

Or we can go left kick to body, right cross, left hook, right kick to the leg. too many to list.

How to break em off is really, really simple. Work your ass off at least 20 to 25 hours a week in a gym with a VERY heavy emphasis on pad work (5 to 9 rds in a row) and foot work. With some imtermittent sparring with people both better and worse than you are. Sparring generally is a very poor tool to fix mistakes.

Sparring is for mild experimentation and to show us what our deficiencies are. Pad work with defensive drills fix our mistakes. Sort of like sparring is a quiz, but padwork and drills are the studying/homework, and of course an actual fight the exam. Waaaaaay too many guys think alot of early sparring and heavy bag work will make them better. it wont, as the bag reinforces bad habits sometimes, and sparring is only useful if we have a person tell us what we are doing wrong and then have a drill/exercise we can do outside of sparring to fix it.

And dont expect to land anything too significant on anyone close to decent with 2 months of training.

My point is, there are no shortcuts. There are more efficient ways to train, but not all people respond to the same drills/exercises at the same speed, no matter how much time they put in. Best to walk the path, enjoy what you see and do and not get lost because your eyes are too focused on the destination and not looking where you are and where you are walking now.