Remember the Portland burrito cart nonsense?


FRAT Version, 2 white broads went to Mexico, learned how to make tortillas, came back and opened a burrito cart. Local activists were outraged by the cultural appropriation.

 

Kooks Burritos, and a War Over Cultural Appropriation Breaks Out
Within two hours, the women received death threats on their Instagram pages, then death threats on their personal cellphones.

 

What happened: WW reviewed a weekend breakfast burrito pop-up in Buckman called Kooks Burritos.

The two women who started Kooks Burritos, Liz Connelly and Kali Wilgus, described their inspiration for the tortillas, which were based on those served from lobster stalls in the coastal Mexican town of Porto Allegre. "They wouldn't tell us too much about technique," Connelly said, "but we were peeking into the windows of every kitchen, totally fascinated by how easy they made it look."

Then the internet exploded.
A loosely organized online campaign accused Connelly and Wilgus of "cultural appropriation" by stealing from the tortilla chefs in Porto Allegre. Within two hours, the women received death threats on their Instagram pages, then death threats on their personal cellphones. They closed Kooks before the following weekend.

It didn't stop there. Local activist Alex Felsinger and Broadspace co-founder Kristin Goodman created and circulated a list of white-owned businesses that should be boycotted for stealing culture, even though many of them were actually owned by people of color.
Then the conservative media picked up on this story and Kooks' closure, and a second wave of people from all over the country got pissed off at the first wave.
Soon, national and international news outlets from The Washington Post to the London Daily Mail picked up on this story.
Everyone was very angry.

Why it mattered: The luckless founders of Kooks had stumbled into a long-standing battle between progressive activists and their right-wing foils over cultural appropriation.
For years, tensions had simmered about racism in Portland's restaurant industry, particularly regarding white chefs profiting from the cuisines of non-white cultures. Kooks' founders were in the wrong place at the wrong time, and WW's positive review of their pop-up, ironically, didn't help.

"Why is it these girls, right now?" Anh Luu, owner of Vietnamese-Cajun restaurant Tapalaya, said in an interview with WW. "Lots of people of different races have been opening up restaurants that are not of their own race. I feel like if two white dudes had opened a burrito truck, saying, 'We spent a few months in Mexico speaking broken Spanish,' people would be like, 'Oh, cool, brah! That's awesome!'"
The Kooks controversy was one of the ugliest scuffles over appropriation seen in Portland or in the U.S. this year. But it was hardly the last. The same ingredients—hashtag activism, a heightened sensitivity to racial injustice, and the thrill of online righteousness that quickly shades into bullying—appeared again and again as America tried to deal with its collective political anger.
Wilgus and Connelly are no longer on social media and could not be reached for comment.
 
https://www.wweek.com/news/2017/12/19/may-17-ww-reviews-kooks-burritos-and-a-war-over-cultural-appropriation-breaks-out/
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Retarded left

 I feel like if two white dudes had opened a burrito truck, saying, 'We spent a few months in Mexico speaking broken Spanish,' people would be like, 'Oh, cool, brah! That's awesome!'"

 

ya this is BS

 

Rick Bayless who is an EXPERT at mexican cuisine was accused of cultural appropriation

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Portland is retardville anyway.

3 Likes

They admitted to literally stealing recipes from local Mexican families and then profiteering off of cultural IP theft without paying any royalties to the recipe holders.

 

Lots of wacky shit in Portland, but this wasn't that big of a deal and the right call.

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VTCO - 

They admitted to literally stealing recipes from local Mexican families and then profiteering off of cultural IP theft without paying any royalties to the recipe holders.


 


Lots of wacky shit in Portland, but this wasn't that big of a deal and the right call.


Recipes aren't IP.

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They had to go to Mexico to learn how to make Tortillas? 

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VTCO - 

They admitted to literally stealing recipes from local Mexican families and then profiteering off of cultural IP theft without paying any royalties to the recipe holders.


 


Lots of wacky shit in Portland, but this wasn't that big of a deal and the right call.


They watched women make flour tortillas.


 


Here's a recipe, no secrets:


flour


water


lard


baking soda


lard


 


 

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DropKick Joe - 

They had to go to Mexico to learn how to make Tortillas? 


They were on vacation, loved the tortillas, and wanted to try making them at home.  Eventually they were selling burritos out of a food truck.

Does anyone else feel like the whole crusade of cultural appropriation, is itself, racist?  I read it as "others outside the culture are not allowed to partake in the culture"... which is excluding people based on culture, with no other consideration?

 

Shit like this makes me think Twitter, FB, social media... is not a step forward for humanity, but a big step back.  When people have so much time on their hands, or their hobby is chasing down people who open up a fucking taco cart... time to take a long look in the mirror.

6 Likes

VTCO -

They admitted to literally stealing recipes from local Mexican families and then profiteering off of cultural IP theft without paying any royalties to the recipe holders.


 


Lots of wacky shit in Portland, but this wasn't that big of a deal and the right call.

Dude you’re an idiot. 

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Brockback Mountain -
VTCO - 

They admitted to literally stealing recipes from local Mexican families and then profiteering off of cultural IP theft without paying any royalties to the recipe holders.


 


Lots of wacky shit in Portland, but this wasn't that big of a deal and the right call.


Recipes aren't IP.

(Laughs at you in Monsanto)

Why is it that anything considered 'white' is completely fair game for appropriation though?

VTCO -

They admitted to literally stealing recipes from local Mexican families and then profiteering off of cultural IP theft without paying any royalties to the recipe holders.


 


Lots of wacky shit in Portland, but this wasn't that big of a deal and the right call.

death threats on cell phones are the right call? 

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I don't get what's so hard to understand about cultural appropriation.  When you play the music of a different culture, you are appropriating that culture.  For example, cla ssical music is the cultural music of Western Europe.  Any person of color who plays cla ssical music is guilty of cultural appropriation. This is why I have sent death threats to all cla ssical musicians of color.  

VTCO - 

They admitted to literally stealing recipes from local Mexican families and then profiteering off of cultural IP theft without paying any royalties to the recipe holders.


 


Lots of wacky shit in Portland, but this wasn't that big of a deal and the right call.


God you're a fucking idiot.

JohnanthanDoe -

I don't get what's so hard to understand about cultural appropriation.  When you play the music of a different culture, you are appropriating that culture.  For example, cla ssical music is the cultural music of Western Europe.  Any person of color who plays cla ssical music is guilty of cultural appropriation. This is why I have sent death threats to all cla ssical musicians of color.  

We should go back and figure out who was the first culture to use fire to cook food.  They should totally have a lock on that for all eternity.

oranos - 
Brockback Mountain -
VTCO - 

They admitted to literally stealing recipes from local Mexican families and then profiteering off of cultural IP theft without paying any royalties to the recipe holders.


 


Lots of wacky shit in Portland, but this wasn't that big of a deal and the right call.


Recipes aren't IP.

(Laughs at you in Monsanto)


What Recipes does Monsanto own?

In 1853, George Crum, a man of African and Native-American descent invented the potato chip in a Saratoga Springs, NY restaurant called Cary's Moon Lakehouse.

 

Lays is fucked.

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