reparations - coming sooner than later

an excellent new york times article. 

 

I will leave an excerpt here:

At the center of those policies must be reparations. “The process of creating the racial wealth chasm begins with the failure to provide the formerly enslaved with the 40 acres they were promised,” Darity told me. “So the restitution has never been given, and it’s 155 years overdue.”

Darity has been studying and advocating reparations for 30 years, and this spring he and his partner, A. Kirsten Mullen, published the book “From Here to Equality: Reparations for Black Americans in the 21st Century.” Both history and road map, the book answers the questions about who should receive reparations and how a program would work. I will not spend much time on that here, except to make these few points. Reparations are not about punishing white Americans, and white Americans are not the ones who would pay for them. It does not matter if your ancestors engaged in slavery or if you just immigrated here two weeks ago. Reparations are a societal obligation in a nation where our Constitution sanctioned slavery, Congress passed laws protecting it and our federal government initiated, condoned and practiced legal racial segregation and discrimination against black Americans until half a century ago. And so it is the federal government that pays.

Reparations would go to any person who has documentation that he or she identified as a black person for at least 10 years before the beginning of any reparations process and can trace at least one ancestor back to American slavery. Reparations should include a commitment to vigorously enforcing existing civil rights prohibitions against housing, educational and employment discrimination, as well as targeted investments in government-constructed segregated black communities and the segregated schools that serve a disproportionate number of black children. But critically, reparations must include individual cash payments to descendants of the enslaved in order to close the wealth gap.

The technical details, frankly, are the easier part. The real obstacle, the obstacle that we have never overcome, is garnering the political will — convincing enough Americans that the centuries-long forced economic disadvantage of black Americans should be remedied, that restitution is owed to people who have never had an equal chance to take advantage of the bounty they played such a significant part in creating.

This country can be remarkably generous. Each year Congress allocates money — this year $5 million — to help support Holocaust survivors living in America. In backing the funding measure, Representative Richard E. Neal, a Democrat from Massachusetts, said in 2018 that this country has a “responsibility to support the surviving men and women of the Holocaust and their families.” And he is right. It is the moral thing to do. And yet Congress has refused for three decades to pass H.R. 40, a bill to simply study the issue of reparations. Its drafter, Representative John Conyers Jr., a Michigan Democrat and descendant of enslaved Americans, died in 2019 — during the 400th anniversary of the arrival of the first Africans enslaved in Virginia — without the bill ever making it out of committee.

There are living victims of racial apartheid and terrorism born in this country, including civil rights activists who lost their homes and jobs fighting to make this country a democracy, who have never received any sort of restitution for what they endured. Soon, like their enslaved ancestors, they will all be dead, too, and then we’ll hear the worn excuse that this country owes no reparations because none of the victims are still alive. Darity and Mullen call this the “delay until death” tactic. Procrastination, they say, does not erase what is owed.

Lol I like the leading question before the article... "What is owed?".

 

Not a damn thing.

11 Likes

We can't make it on our own. Give us handouts evil raysis!

13 Likes

this country has a “responsibility to support the surviving men and women of the Holocaust and their families.” And he is right.
Someone explain me why? The American tax payer has a responsibility to do this...?

5 Likes

Let whoever wants to donate to reparations pour the liberal heart out. Otherwise, good luck with getting the US on board. People would leave, lol.

4 Likes

They'll get my reparations from a 7.62x39....

8 Likes

What's with these old low post troll accounts popping up?

 

Oh right, election season...

7 Likes

Shouldnt the democratic party AKA the party of the confederacy pay?


Republicans fought and died to FREE THE SLAVES.

7 Likes

I wonder if reparations would stop the phantom “everything is racist” claims. 

Windfall -
this country has a “responsibility to support the surviving men and women of the Holocaust and their families.” And he is right.
Someone explain me why? The American tax payer has a responsibility to do this...?

Cuz Jews run politics and will never, ever let the world forget the holocaust. Pretty obvious

4 Likes

FlowWithTheGo -

I wonder if reparations would stop the phantom “everything is racist” claims. 

They would not 

rexkwondo79 -

an excellent new york times article. 


 


I will leave an excerpt here:


At the center of those policies must be reparations. “The process of creating the racial wealth chasm begins with the failure to provide the formerly enslaved with the 40 acres they were promised,” Darity told me. “So the restitution has never been given, and it’s 155 years overdue.”


Darity has been studying and advocating reparations for 30 years, and this spring he and his partner, A. Kirsten Mullen, published the book “From Here to Equality: Reparations for Black Americans in the 21st Century.” Both history and road map, the book answers the questions about who should receive reparations and how a program would work. I will not spend much time on that here, except to make these few points. Reparations are not about punishing white Americans, and white Americans are not the ones who would pay for them. It does not matter if your ancestors engaged in slavery or if you just immigrated here two weeks ago. Reparations are a societal obligation in a nation where our Constitution sanctioned slavery, Congress passed laws protecting it and our federal government initiated, condoned and practiced legal racial segregation and discrimination against black Americans until half a century ago. And so it is the federal government that pays.


Reparations would go to any person who has documentation that he or she identified as a black person for at least 10 years before the beginning of any reparations process and can trace at least one ancestor back to American slavery. Reparations should include a commitment to vigorously enforcing existing civil rights prohibitions against housing, educational and employment discrimination, as well as targeted investments in government-constructed segregated black communities and the segregated schools that serve a disproportionate number of black children. But critically, reparations must include individual cash payments to descendants of the enslaved in order to close the wealth gap.


The technical details, frankly, are the easier part. The real obstacle, the obstacle that we have never overcome, is garnering the political will — convincing enough Americans that the centuries-long forced economic disadvantage of black Americans should be remedied, that restitution is owed to people who have never had an equal chance to take advantage of the bounty they played such a significant part in creating.


This country can be remarkably generous. Each year Congress allocates money — this year $5 million — to help support Holocaust survivors living in America. In backing the funding measure, Representative Richard E. Neal, a Democrat from Massachusetts, said in 2018 that this country has a “responsibility to support the surviving men and women of the Holocaust and their families.” And he is right. It is the moral thing to do. And yet Congress has refused for three decades to pass H.R. 40, a bill to simply study the issue of reparations. Its drafter, Representative John Conyers Jr., a Michigan Democrat and descendant of enslaved Americans, died in 2019 — during the 400th anniversary of the arrival of the first Africans enslaved in Virginia — without the bill ever making it out of committee.


There are living victims of racial apartheid and terrorism born in this country, including civil rights activists who lost their homes and jobs fighting to make this country a democracy, who have never received any sort of restitution for what they endured. Soon, like their enslaved ancestors, they will all be dead, too, and then we’ll hear the worn excuse that this country owes no reparations because none of the victims are still alive. Darity and Mullen call this the “delay until death” tactic. Procrastination, they say, does not erase what is owed.

Congrats on your free blue name, faggot!

Got some reparations for op right here

 

1 Like

2 Likes

Can we ban this idiot yet?

So what happens after they're paid?  We good then?

 

I'd gladly give $10/paycheck to quit hearing about racist white men, priveledge, etc. 

 

Where do I sign?

FlowWithTheGo -

I wonder if reparations would stop the phantom “everything is racist” claims. 

Nope. It will get spent and they'll want more within the same month. They don't get more? Racist.

Oh, also. Nice thread. This should get the content flowing this AM.

1 Like

Windfall -
this country has a “responsibility to support the surviving men and women of the Holocaust and their families.” And he is right.
Someone explain me why? The American tax payer has a responsibility to do this...?

ITS NOT -


Financial Assistance and Reparations


The governments of many countries that participated in the atrocities have set aside monies as “reparations” for survivors. Though the destruction of Jewish lives during the Holocaust is impossible to repair, the reparations are intended to provide restitution, compensation and some relief for victims.


Since 1951, the Conference on Material Claims Against Germany (Claims Conference) has negotiated with various governments including Germany, Austria, Hungary, Switzerland and others to obtain reparations, providing “a small measure of justice for victims of Nazi persecution.”